Anyone else built their own Clock?

Discussion in 'Clock Construction' started by Ck, Nov 3, 2006.

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  1. Ck

    Ck Guest

    These are a few pics of two I have built, think I have mentioned at one time I had a Working Woodshop which in turn lead me to an interest in Clocks.

    The Very First Clock I built, Busters' Brother had cut down a Large Eastern Red Cedar and had it cut into boards and gave Buster. They were rough cut and Buster brought over some and asked if I would plane them, and mentioned He would give Me half the lumber for the work, I ended up with enough Good Lumber for about six Clocks!

    View attachment 3200

    First intended for My Wife at the time, I ended up giving it to My Grandmother for Christmas. She had it for several years until She Passed away. It was Stopped at that time and not run since.

    View attachment 3201

    It Is NOT a Quartz!! It's battery wound and fully mechanical from there, the Pendulum does actually keep the time. Buster had given it and an old Case to "Tinker" with. They weren't mated, the old case was Much shorter and wider.

    View attachment 3202

    The Latch Hook is an Old original, and I Did mortise out the opening and drove a Brass wire rod in for the catch.

    View attachment 3203

    The pattern for this is from "How to build 35 Antique Clocks" which be found at Timesavers. LaRose was still going strong at the time, I got the W. German 8-Day T/S Movement for I believe $187. The Best They Offered.

    View attachment 3204

    Built from Rough Cut Oak straight from a Local Sawmill, I did all further Milling. Each different Part of the Case was cut fron ONE Board so that the Grain pattern would follow around.
    231/2" Tall x 16" Wide, 12" Dialpan.

    View attachment 3205
     
  2. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    I've made some. One I have is a 30 hour ogee (but not in an ogee style case), and I have made some nice ones at work (Quartz, though, with 'fake' pendulum swinger thing).

    I am curious about one thing. What did you use to make your shallow curved-top moldings on the oak schoolhouse clock (like on the door and around the base)?
     
  3. Ck

    Ck Guest

    I used a Round-over bit in My Router table, Partial Profile, along the Edge of a Board, then cut it to Molding thickness on a Tablesaw and dressed the cut on a Jointer.

    The boards were 5/4, rough cut from the Mill.
     
  4. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    Aha. It's the router table. That's what I need to build next. I have a really good little router, but there's only so much you can do "by hand" with it.

    Thanks for the info.
     
  5. jazzy454

    jazzy454 Registered User

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    I've made five banjo's and one diamondhead banjo, all weight driven, along with a miniature that uses a Waltham movement. This is my third banjo that I made, this one was for my girlfriend.

    View attachment 3212

    Hopefully I can find pictures of the diamondhead that I gave to my father.
     
  6. chrsvor25

    chrsvor25 Registered User

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    when i was a little kid, i made a couple of small ones from craft store kits.

    when i was a little older, like late elementary school age, i bought a antique clock plan book.

    built an ogee clock. well. sort of. it has a door frame for the front. its heavier then the rest of the clock so it has a tendency to fall forward. and it has a time only movement. i dont even think it has a back.

    but yeah. i found merritts through that book because it has a long list of companies, most of em out of business or changed names.

    so that was good.

    although my woodworking skills have improved, i feel it is better to take up what little space i have with antique clocks as opposed to cluttering it up with new ones with mediocre movements.
     
  7. Ck

    Ck Guest

    Yeah Sooth, they're Super handy! If ya enjoy "The New Yankee Workshop" you can get a Plan for a really Great one from the associated PBS Website.
    Mine is very simple though, just a flat-topped table on a fold-up stand with a cut-out for mounting the Router underneath, and a good straight-edged board with a Centered cut-out for the cutter, and Bolt tightened clamps to hold it in place once positioned.
    Shoot, I can do near anything Norm can, and had a third the tools! ;) A Will, A Way.
     
  8. Ck

    Ck Guest

    Nice Banjo Jeff, is that veneer cross-banding around the edges?
     
  9. jazzy454

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    Thanks Ck, no that solid tiger maple for the frames, head and sides. Birdeye maple for the throat panel and compartment box panel.
     
  10. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    Some fantastic cases, and all better than I could manage!
    I think availability of exotic woods in USA is easier.

    Probably a pondism, but I (we) would not term that "making a clock" unless I made the movement, which is really the major part of a clock.
    That publication title is a complete nonsense as well - how on earth can you build an antique anything?.
    Apologies for calling a spade a spade - JMO! :biggrin:
    I'll just make myself a 1950 cup of coffee.

    Here's one of mine:

    View attachment 3213

    Sorry, the only wood is the base - mahogany offcuts from a shopfitter, turned and French polished.
     
  11. Scottie-TX

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    I did. Once, I did. Guess I cheated tho; I used the wheels and anchor from the kit. I made one of those early Foliots using the drawings for the kit. The kit was plastic. I used various hardwoods. Nope no pix. I gave it to my kid.
     
  12. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Mike, they should have worded it like all the rubbish on ebay called "antique style" clocks. :biggrin:
    Scottie, we've seen your homemade outdoor clock ;)
    Harold
     
  13. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    It's funny that this topic was posted at this time. My boss just got me to make a new clock to sell in our showroom, and I finished work on it today (started yesterday). It's made of solid cherry, throughout, and I LOOSELY based the new design off an antique vienna I saw recently.

    Our previous clock was... ok, but I didn't like it much. I also got rid of the tacky brass "Strip" break-away rod that came with the fake pendulum, and used the pieces from it to fit a wooden rod (shopmade).

    And yes, this will house a crappy 15$ Quartz movement with fake magnetic pendulum swing. My boss also insists to include the seconds hand, which I loathe. Still, at least the case is much nicer.

    Here's what the parts looked like before staining. Note that the dial is square. Our next one will have a proper round dial with *hopefully* roman numerals.

    View attachment 3214

    The next two were taken after staining. I did the rod in a black finish. The clock still needs to be lacquered, and have glass fitted. I'll have photos of the completed clock when it's all finished probably by next tuesday or wednesday.

    View attachment 3215

    View attachment 3216

    EDIT: For those who are wondering what that "block" is, on the backboard (off to the left) it's a support block that holds a clip, which keeps the dial and movement in place. The dial and movement are attached at the top (see first picture) with hinges, and it allows for easy access to change the battery. The dial is a square, creme "shaker" dial with arabic numerals, and it will be glued to the square piece shown in the first picture.
     
  14. Scottie-TX

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    STUNNING work I could only dream of. Candidly - if I even had the tools: I could not do that. Certainly not a criticism - just an observation. The grain direction on the backboard. Interesting that YOU chose to have it "sweep" down. My choice would have been an "up" sweep!
    Care to comment?
     
  15. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    I wasn't sure wether to have the backboard go up or down. I thought that down would attact the ey more towards the pendulum bob.

    It's not a very difficult case to make, but it does have quite a bit of little tricky bits.

    For the most part, it's all butt-joints, held with a screw and glue, then a wooden plug is fitted in the hole and sanded flush. The rest is fancy routings, and little bits of molding. All the moldings are just glued and nailed on. Took about 10 hours to make the "first" one (this one), but I can probably make one MUCH faster next time around.

    Thanks for the compliments.

    I'd actually love to make a vienna (for myself) that's similar to a plain laternduhrl (however you write that), like your GB one, OR one like your mini one (the new one with the piecrust dial). My only problem would be to find a proper movement. And I'd want to do mahogany veneer on it...with edge banding in maple...
     
  16. Tom Kloss

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    Hi
    Nice piece of wood work Sooth. I think it shows you love for working with wood.

    Here's the clock that go me started in this business. It's a clock that I integrated a few years back. I say integrated because I didn’t build the case. The case is one I rescued from a fire house. It’s an old case from a Gamewell street box fire alarm enunciator. Here’s some pictures. It was a mess and had 3 coats of paint over beautiful solid oak. No veneer on this one, solid oak, it weighs about 100 pounds and measures about 56 inches high. Needless to say I have it mounted with a ¼ inch lag bolt driven into a wall stud.

    I spent an entire winter stripping the three coats of paint that was on it . I did make the face, new doors, and installed beveled glass. It has a spring driven Urgos movement that has just about run the course of it’s earthly life. This clock may be a marriage of sorts but it's one of a kind and it's mine. Right now I’m I looking for a single weight regulator movement to replace the Urgos.

    Origional unit.
    View attachment 3217

    The results of my work.
    View attachment 3218
    View attachment 3219
    View attachment 3220
    View attachment 3221

    Tom

    “Sometimes you really don’t know if your being rewarded or punished”
     
  17. Kevin W.

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    Verry nice job Sooth, like Scottie i could only dream of making this.I am sure you could build a awesome Vienna sometime.And too bad to make a beauty case like that one and put a quartz movement in it.
    Guess you have to keep the boss happy. :)
     
  18. harold bain

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    Sooth, Hermle makes some pretty good Westminister chime movements that would be a good fit for that case. Considering the labour involved in making the case, it is a shame to go quartz. Pretty hard to compete with the Asian quartz clocks, even with a quality case.
    Tom, very nice case. What did you use for a movement?
    Harold
     
  19. Tom Kloss

    Tom Kloss Registered User
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    Harold:

    It has an Urgos bim bam. I didn't know any better at the time.
     
  20. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    Oh, I know there are better movements, but we sell 99.99% custom made furniture, not clocks. This is just a "fun luxury item" we're throwing in. I would love to see a nice mechanical movement, but let's face it, nowadays, people are FAR too lazy to wind clocks, and most haven't got a clue about suspension springs, and winding with a key, plus the added cost of keeping it cleaned and in good running order. Also, some people hate to have chiming or striking clocks because they find it "annoying". Of course, we all think those people are insane, but that's for another topic! :biggrin:

    With a cheap Quartz movement, anyone can easily have accurate time, and not have to worry about it.

    It is a bit of a shame to have such a nice case, with such a crappy movement, but like I said, we don't sell clocks, really.

    The funny part is that the clock will sell for about 799.00$ CDN, because of the labor, and cost of the wood. In pine, the same clock would be 395.00$

    If anything, I just hope we get a lot of nice comments on it, and maybe sell a few in other woods (like oak, which would be much cheaper).
     
  21. Kevin W.

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    Sooth, a case made of oak, would cost less than pine?
    I always thought a hard wood would cost more.Maybe i just don,t understand.
    Still a nice case. :)
     
  22. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    No no no, Cherry = 799.00, Pine = 395.00
     
  23. harold bain

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    Sooth, I can see where adding another $4-500 for mechanical movement and associated parts would put your price out of reach (or would it, if you have customers for an $800 quartz clock). There is a company in Toronto that custom makes clocks like what you made, and they are not cheap. The name is Westminister Clock Company. They use Hermle movements, and make clocks from Viennas to grandfather clocks, all with quality hardwood cases.
    Harold
     
  24. Scottie-TX

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    BTW; How tall is your clock? How wide?
    Four to five hundred for a movement? Nah!
    Nice, old, ready-to-run, one wt. Viennas such as I list, seldom bring over $300.
    Go one step further SOO, as my friend in AU and make a REAL vienna. You MAY be mis-reading the market. Maybe do one on a trial basis with a price of $1200 to $1500 - or MORE!
     
  25. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    The door on this one is about 9 x 28. I don't know the exact height.

    As for the price, that's up to my boss, not me. It's also not an antique, in need of repairs, it's sold as new. I very much doubt that one will sell, since it's cherry. We have not had many sales in Cherry, but people like to see it.

    We may just get that one buyer who really wants it, too. We sold a mirror right off the wall in our showroom that was Cherry. The mirror was over 500$. It's really hard to tell.

    I'd love to make a vienna, Scottie, but I much rather have an antique one.
     
  26. RJSoftware

    RJSoftware Registered User

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    Hey Sooth;

    Wondering how your gonna handle the glass.

    Great job you got! Sounds like a great boss too.

    Does he collect clocks as well?

    RJ
     
  27. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    Hahaha, my boss could care less about clocks.

    As for the glass, all our glass and mirrors get installed by a local glass shop. They will likely install them using clear silicone (this is what they normally use). Silicone would not be my choice (I'd use wood strips) but it's not up to me.
     
  28. Scottie-TX

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    ARJAY, glass is usually handled by the edges.
    Cherry wood? Gorgeous wood - not seen that offen in clox.Very light in color - your stain helps. Most viennas are dark. My choice would be either burl walnut or my favorite - rosewood. I'd use any specie hardwood for the substrate. I'd come back and veneer with either of those. Advantage? You can have grain patterns with veneer incosistent with straight-cutting wood where strength is a concern. Bookmatches and quarter matches add interest. Circassian walnut is very common in viennas.
     
  29. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    Harold
    This is what happens is someone is honest - have a look at the questions below.
    GJR 11L is a friend of mine.

    This is useful for identifying woods.
     
  30. ChrisDownUnder

    ChrisDownUnder Registered User

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    I have begun building a W.R. Smith grasshopper skeleton clock.

    So far I have just been cutting and filing the movement plates. See below.


    View attachment 3222

    .
    .
    Hopefully the finished clock is going to look something like this:
    .
    .
    View attachment 3223
     
  31. jazzy454

    jazzy454 Registered User

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    Here is a Diamonhead banjo that I built for my father as a birthday present to him. I copied a Wayne Cline banjo that I have for the measurements.

    View attachment 3224
     
  32. Ck

    Ck Guest

    Chris That's a Truly commendable, ambious Project! I wish You Great luck with it.
    Jeff Your's is a Great accomplishment! Beautiful Clock.
     
  33. Scottie-TX

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    One AWESOME clock and undertaking there, CDU; Fusee drive, EW outside the plates, grasshopper, inverted pendulum! One helluva clock. 'Course if you're copying a clock - you want it to be close as possible to identical but - just me - I'd also consider piercing that topmost diamond to add interest.
     
  34. ChrisDownUnder

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    I'm facing a very steep learning curve, but I should definitely know something about clocks by the time I get it built.

    Everything is to be made from basic metal stock. (sheet and bar, mostly brass, but some items are silver steel.) Wheel cutting, lantern pinions, hand turning of the feet and pillars, fusee and all.

    As part of the process I will also be making things like gauges and depthing tools. I will be making my own cutters for the escape wheels and ratchets.

    Fortunately for me, Mr. Smith provides a complete manual of instructions for making the clock, along with a set of DVDs that demonstrate the machining and workshop techniques.
     
  35. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    Great stuff, Chris. Just do a bit at a time when you feel like it; in no time at all, a clock will appear!
    The grasshopper escapement is fascinating to watch.
    What sort of lathe do you have? What was the source of the article and the CDs?
     
  36. ChrisDownUnder

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    I have a 10" x 22" Chinese lathe and an A.W.T. Webster Whitcomb watchmaker's lathe. I haven't used the watchmaker's lathe yet as I need to set up a motor for it.

    I am adapting a Sherline headstock to operate as a live milling spindle in the 10x22 lathe for wheel cutting. (I will need to make dividing plates too.)

    Bill Smith's original construction articles were published in the British magazine "Model Engineer", about 20 years ago. I bought the complete set as a book from clocktools.com. The workshop DVDs are also available from there.

    I am a total beginner at machining, so having all this detailed instructional material is a big help to me.
     
  37. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    Thanks for that, Chris. 10 x 22 (we would call it 5 x 22 here) is quite a big lathe - but obviously it is fairly new, so should be accurate enough.
    My biggest lathe is a 1948 Myford ML7 - 3.5 inch swing that you would call 7"; most of the clock stuff I do with a Unimat 3 or Seig milling machine.
     
  38. LenzkirchFan

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    I have posted this picture on one of the Lenzkirch threads but will also put it here. I built the case and put an antique (80 year old) movement in it. I have just recently finished two more as gifts to close family members. It is mostly made out of solid oak with very little plywood. I don't like the plywood!

    Steve

    View attachment 3225
     
  39. Joe Hollen

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    Jeff:

    That Diamondhead (Munroe type) timepiece is very nice indeed ! (Are those Moberg glasses?) Did you use a Lenderman movement, and just turn everything upside-down ? Nice woodworking too !!!! Very VERY nice !!!

    This past summer I used a custom Lenderman movement (pendulum on the back, banjo length with a passing bell strike) to make a long-planned project ... a Simon Willard "type" Lighthouse Clock. I used no plans,
    just "guesstimates" on the dimensions. Only two things guided those dimensions. The pendulum length, and the bell jar diameter...

    I was going to sell it, but my wife won't let me :)

    This is the Lighthouse clock along with another "Girandole type" clock that I built in 2004... Both are on Mr. Lenderman's website ! They don't make 'em any better than Mr. and Mrs. Lenderman (Charles and Jane) !!! They are truly "the best" !

    View attachment 3226

    View attachment 3227
     
  40. jazzy454

    jazzy454 Registered User

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    Nice work Joe. Yes the diamondhead has Moberg glasses in them. I had to go directly to Wayne Cline for them because when he made his diamondhead he didn't have an original in front of him and just took measurements from a picture. His throat is one inch longer than it should. That is also a Lenderman movement just turned upside down.
     
  41. Ck

    Ck Guest

    Steve,
    That is one Beatuiful Clock! Congrats!! An Oak veneered plywood in the back of such a Clock is acceptable, did You do the Turned buttons as well?

    Joe,
    Sorry bud, I have to go along with Your Wife, Such Fine examples of hand crafted work should only ever be destined for Family Heirlooms!
    Just imagine Your Great, Great Grandson Proudly proclaiming "Yes, My Great, Great Grandfather Made this Himself."

    Chuck.
     
  42. Joe Hollen

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    Thanks Chuck...

    By the way, all of the clocks built by the contributors here were very nicely done ! I'm impressed !

    Sooth: I'm impressed that you were able to make the case you did in one / two days ?!? Nice work ! Was it from a kit? plans? etc. Sheesh, it takes me many MANY days of cutting, sanding, shaping, fitting, gluing, etc. to make just one case !

    Tom: That clock you made from the old case is also very impressive !!!

    Keep the pictures coming !

    Joe
     
  43. I've not made a clock, but I have modifed one. It was a westminster fhs, turned it to a triple chime, very difficult as I did not have very much space to play with, but now its excellent

    replaced gongs, movement, pendulum stick, dial etc.

    View attachment 3228
    View attachment 3229
     
  44. Sooth

    Sooth Registered User
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    #44 Sooth, Nov 7, 2006
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 7, 2017
    Joe, please be aware that I make furniture for a living. I work in a small custom furniture shop, which is very well equipped. Not counting the gluing, I can make an entire armoire (with adjustable shelves, raised panel doors, 3 drawers, crown molding...) in about 2 days. I can make a 4-5 drawer dresser in about a day.

    The clock seen above was made with no plans. The only requirement was that there was enough room for the rather excessive swing of the battery-operated pendulum (which is about 8 inches). The rest, I simply came up with as I went along. It helps that I've been looking at a lot of viennas recently, and it's loosely based off a few I've seen.

    You can see my company's website here:
    www.jccustomfurniture.com
    And yes, I've personally made at least one of absolutely every single item seen in any photos. I've been working there for over 5 years.
     
  45. Joe Hollen

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    Sooth:

    Well, that explains your "speed" and "quality" ! (And the fact that you collect antique woodworking tools also ;-) Again, very nice work !

    Jeff:

    I've been waiting for a picture or two of the diamondhead that you made ! Did you do the lighter wood inlay yourself in the frames?

    On another note, I used Campos girandole arms on the pictured girandole, but I had to bend the heck out of them to get them to fit. Then, I found a site called "Emachineshop.com". I have since downloaded their CADCAM software, designed, ordered & received four sets of Girandole sidearms that fit MUCH better than Campos sidearms. (Campos girandole clocks use a 1" longer movement, and the throat is "fatter" than my design... I use a Banjo sized movement, and a thinner throat). These sidearms from EMachineshop.com are actually cutout using a "waterjet" tool that is controlled by a computer. They don't come in polished, but they're a fraction of the cost of Campos arms... You need to do a bit of filing, and a whole lotta polishing...but the results are well worth it.

    I have another Girandole with glass panels (which I reverse paint myself) in the works. When it's done I'll post a picture or two...

    Great topic !

    Joe
     
  46. tin-injun

    tin-injun Registered User

    Nov 10, 2002
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    Hi All,Wow! Some nice clocks everyone.I am glad to see people are still interested in making things that can be passed on to the next generation.Thought I would share my latest project,I just finished putting in the glass this evening.First off,top and rosette on the bottom is the only prefab parts,door is of pressed oak I had laying around.The dial and glasses actually took longer to design and paint than the entire case.The case will get a circa 1920 Sessions time only movement when I get time to go through it.And again,nice clocks everyone keep up the good work. Best Regards,Kent
    View attachment 3230
     
  47. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    Nice work. VERY nice work. Another of my first loves - store regulators - still love 'em. S'pose that local has meaning for you.
     
  48. jazzy454

    jazzy454 Registered User

    May 26, 2002
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    Hi Joe, if you go to this site you'll see a few more pictures of the diamondhead: My Collection I bought the inlay from a company and for the life of me I can't remember the name of it, but I did do the inlay in the mahogany myself.
     
  49. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

    Dec 17, 2003
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    :redface: I had to Google to find out what "Teamsters Local" was - a union, not a pub as I thought! :redface:
     
  50. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    Yeah; Go figger. I gnu sumthin' wuza ale-in ya.
     

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