Anybody seen this before? Hands set through hole in glass

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by zedric, Jan 14, 2018.

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  1. zedric

    zedric Registered User

    Aug 8, 2012
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    I was looking at a clock that came up for auction last weekend. It was an unusual clock in that it is an Austrian travelling clock, but made in the manner of Thomas Cole's strut clocks. I haven't seen another Austrian clock like this before. The height of the clock is only 11cm, so quite a small clock, and it has a repeating movement, presumably running for one day.

    Hopefully this link works..

    A. W. Mayer in Wien Oval Enamel Dial Table Clock, with gilt metal frame having easel back.

    Anyway, the thing that struck me about it is how you set the hands - if you zoom in on the picture, you can see that there is a hole cut into the centre of the glass covering the dial, and the hand set square is accessed through this hole!

    The clock looks to have the original movement, so while this seems like an afterthought on the part of the maker, it must have been part of the design.. But I was wondering if this was at all common?
     
  2. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Sep 4, 2008
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    I have no idea why it was made this way but it certainly looks like the hands need to be set from the front. There is no way to do it from the back. The only thing that comes to mind if this is not the original design is that the glass might have been added at a later time, thus needing the opening in the middle to set the hands. Or, the original glass was in a bezel that could be opened to set the time.
    Just some random thoughts.

    Uhralt
     
  3. THTanner

    THTanner Registered User
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    Jul 3, 2016
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    I have been trying to find a picture of a clock that had that feature, but instead of just an open hole, there was a small, knurled knob that went in the hole - permanently - and contacted the hands. To set the clock you pushed in a bit and turned the knob. It was a car, dash clock, but I cannot remember what kind of car.

    just found it - VDO Kienzle Dashboard Clock Gauge Fits Mercedes-Benz -
     
  4. zedric

    zedric Registered User

    Aug 8, 2012
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    This is a Thomas Cole strut clock (no 1092/133) that I own, which has the same basic design, although as you can see from the photos of the back the hands are set at the rear on this one, as with all of the Cole clocks, so no need for a hole through the dial. Cole is generally credited with coming up with this design of travelling clock, although in my opinion the design owes quite a lot to the zappler clocks from Germany and Austria that come before it.

    I guess the glass in the Austrian clock could have been a later addition, but if so it has been done well, as the bezel would have had to be modified to fit. 1092-133 (oval) - Mine.jpg Cole back.JPG ..
     
  5. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    I've repaired a nice little German kitchen timer/clock that had a spring loaded setter sorta like THT mentioned. It had a brass battery rewind movement with balance. It was easy and fast to set the hands with the little knob in the middle that could be pushed in to engage the hand shaft and twirled between your fingers.
    Willie X
     
  6. zedric

    zedric Registered User

    Aug 8, 2012
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    There must have been a few like this, because now you mention it I can recall seeing this configuration on car clocks - and a similar button to reset the trip meter that also went through the dash
     
  7. Bill Ward

    Bill Ward Registered User
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    Jan 8, 2003
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    When I was a boy, my parents had a small travel clock which was set by means of a knurled knob in a hole in the glass. I've no idea who made it, but it was certainly from the mid 20th C, probably pre-war. I'd totally forgotten it until your post.
     

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