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American any replacement motors available??

Clockinit

Registered User
Nov 4, 2019
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Hello All...My question this evening is weather any of the motors available thru TIMESAVERS or MERRITTS or any other suppliers.are a possible replacement for the motor i am showing here? It's out of a ST MEDBURY model, c.1935. Its a SANGAMO motor.....The descriptions I see om TIMESAVERS website...tell me no..Can anyone shed some light as to whether or not there is a replacement for this motor....

Bob

em6.jpg em5.jpg em4.jpg em3.jpg em2.jpg em1.jpg
 

Karl Thies

NAWCC Member
Mar 13, 2018
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There are no replacement motors available that I know of except by buying a donor movement for a motor exchange/replacement. Why do you need a new motor? These motors are easy to clean and repair. . The top is cleaned like any other clock part. The coil part is cleaned with pegwood on the bushing and reoiled ( never submerge the coil in any cleaning fluids) Is the coil burned out? Generally the work on the motor is minimal. The work is sometimes enormous on the mechanical portion of the clock. involving bushings and sometimes pivot replacement.
 

Clockinit

Registered User
Nov 4, 2019
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I got the clock running with some wiring repair at the entry point of the case and, soldering the leads back on, on the side of the motor. The motor ran well, but was noisy and a little wobbly...It kept getting noisier by the day and then just sort of froze up...When I took it out of the movement the drive gear and shaft came out of the top. Seems like that bushing just gave out. I can't seem to get it staked back on there and if it feels like I got it, there is friction between the top and lower pieces...The motor feels like it wants to turn, I feel the energy in my fingertips, but it just wont turn...are there bushings inside that lower half where the shaft goes in to it?

Bob
 

Karl Thies

NAWCC Member
Mar 13, 2018
68
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Queens, New York
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The motor should disassemble into three parts. The middle section spins back and forth easily to a bumper with felt pad. If you are trying to get the motor to run out of the movement, it will not. On the other plate is another bushing which allows the rotor to spin straight. 100_1170.JPG 100_1169.JPG
 

Karl Thies

NAWCC Member
Mar 13, 2018
68
11
8
Queens, New York
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Region
Do not try to stake the motor parts together, they must easily spin freely. Check the condition of the reddish fiber wheel to check for broken teeth or other damage to the fiber.. When cleaning this wheel never soak to wheel, clean with a brush and dry. Many times this wheel is the cause of noise or the stopping of the motor.
 
Last edited:

coldwar

Registered User
May 20, 2009
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This is a slow speed motor assy which was not replaced in normal factory authorized service except in instances where the coil was open, due to a lightning hit. There is a steel ball at the bottom of the field and coil assy hole which is found packed with solidified grease and oil if in original condition. Use a piece of steel attached to a strong magnet to remove the ball, then clean hole completely and lube on reassembly. If the steel shaft shows any wear indentation at the ball contact point, burnish that out removing only enough to do the job. I have disassembled the ball end of the bushing in the field and coil, allowing the steel disc to get flipped to provide a virgin contact area for the ball to ride against as well as getting the field and coil side bushing completely clean, but that work doesn't seem to always result in better, quieter running, only a more thorough servicing. If the bushings are worn the motor will produce a oscillating sound when running. I have seen both brass and pink brass bushings factory in these assys. Again, if the bushings are severely worn, the motor assy may not always self-start.

I and we always coated the micarda wheel teeth lightly with Moebius grease. You can flip the wheel on the arbor if the teeth show severe wear. Good luck ~
 

Clockinit

Registered User
Nov 4, 2019
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Thank You Karl & Coldwar...Let me digest all that and see if I can make it right...It'll be very satisfying to make this thing "come alive' again...!!!

Thanks Again!! and I will let you know!!
Bob
 

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