• The Bulletins and Marts are again available online. The network connectivity problem has been fixed. Thank you all very much for your patience.

Any ideas who made this grandfather clock?

TMcollector

Registered User
Oct 7, 2014
11
1
3
Country
Region
Hey everyone. First post. I got hardly any info on this clock when I bought it. It was supposedly made in the 1950's for a surgeon in Massachusetts. It's a cherry case, with a pre-1900 E Howard movement. The movement has a bell, not a gong, which I did not find on any other E Howard grandfather movements (at least not when I researched using Google). Any clue? The short list I came up with for possible makers are Forgie, Burt, and Purdy, but I'd like to hear from everyone.
 

Attachments

harold bain

NAWCC Member
Deceased
Nov 4, 2002
40,853
186
63
73
Whitby, Ontario, Canada
Country
Region
Hi, Nick, welcome to the message board.
The movement looks like a typical British tall clock movement. They are not normally signed as to the maker, any identification is usually a dial signature.
 

Tinker Dwight

Registered User
Oct 11, 2010
13,666
80
0
Calif. USA
About when would you think they stopped using pins to hold the movement
together and stated using screws?
The dial looks like it is new or repainted.
One can mount a bell on any movement. It may not
have been original with that movement.
Tinker Dwight
 

harold bain

NAWCC Member
Deceased
Nov 4, 2002
40,853
186
63
73
Whitby, Ontario, Canada
Country
Region
Tink, these movements have been reproduced through the years and in fact one can still buy a new one from Merritts. It is possible the case and movement are of the same age, as it doesn't look particularly old. The pine backboard hasn't aged any as far as I can tell.
 

TMcollector

Registered User
Oct 7, 2014
11
1
3
Country
Region
The movement is an E Howard. It is marked E Howard & Co Boston. It is from between 1858-1881. And the hands belong to that movement. I would guess the dial was repainted in order to be placed in the case. The pictures hide the imperfections. Both the case and the dial look their age in person. So what I am looking for is to narrow down or even possibly identify who constructed the case and installed the movement. Maybe others were made? Or something about it is a signature sign of a specific clockmaker? It was built in the early 1950s, and was sold to someone on the North Shore of Massachusetts. Thanks
 

the 3rd dwarve

Registered User
Nov 3, 2000
700
26
28
That case has no features that are outstanding so I can't help you with a case maker but that is indeed a Howard movement typical of those used in the model #81 hall clocks. The hands are correct to the movement. It was not uncommon for Mass. Clock makers of that era to use Howard movements.
Many Howard hall clocks were listed with a bell strike; the coiled gong was an upcharge. That movement was used for 6 decades, there is no way you can date its manufacture between 1858 and 1881. The only way to possible date it would be too look inside the maintaining power gear, sometimes the inspector would sign and date them there.
D
 

TMcollector

Registered User
Oct 7, 2014
11
1
3
Country
Region
I contacted the collector I bought it from and he had one last piece of info. Apparently the case was built in Concord, MA. Also, I was wondering- did the E Howard movements have "E Howard & Co Boston" engraved on it all six decades that were mentioned? Thanks
 

Forum statistics

Threads
169,789
Messages
1,481,954
Members
49,168
Latest member
WoodPress
Encyclopedia Pages
1,060
Total wiki contributions
2,965
Last update
-