19th c English Any advice about hands?

Tim Perry

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Feb 15, 2022
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I've come into possession of an English grandfather clock from a maker named Charles Lasseter in Steyning, West Sussex. (Some of you may have seen an earlier post about it.) According to a local museum in Steyning, he was definitely in business from 1817 to his death in 1852, but it's likely that he was active as early as 1805. There's no date or other numbers on the clock or the movement, so I can't really narrow down its date of manufacture any more than that. It's basically intact, and it will take very little to get it running again. (I'll have to make one part and straighten another, but that shouldn't be too difficult.) Unfortunately, the hour, minute, and second hands are missing, and will most likely not be found. I'm wondering if anyone has a sense of what style of hands an English clock of that period might have had. I'm attaching pictures of the dial, with the calendar hand still attached, as well as the whole clock, if that helps.

2022-09-08 18.15.04.jpg 2022-07-17 14.17.54.jpg
 

gvasale

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Mar 30, 2005
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Look on eBay for antique tall clocks. You will find plenty of photos. They may be remarkably similar.
 

novicetimekeeper

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Jul 26, 2015
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jmclaugh

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Jun 1, 2006
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After about 1800 the hour and minute hands were invariably a matching pattern and made of steel and by 1830 it appears brass hands had pretty much supplanted steel. As the calendar hand looks steel and there seems no reason to doubt it's original then all the hands should be. If you google 'painted dial longcase clocks' you should get plenty of examples.
 

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