Antique tall case clock movement

David A Vallone

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Can anyone identify this movement as to age and if it is English or American?

Thank You,
David

9EAE672E-8062-48E1-BA8A-3B416CCC3C3B.jpeg 590A94C2-2868-4541-B63E-BF5774A11C67.jpeg
 

Jim DuBois

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Determining country of origin, English vs. American clock movement, can be very difficult. From your two photos, I suspect it to be English, but made well away from London or any other seat of major clockmaking. It is more roughly made than most English/Irish/Scottish movements, but does not exhibit several of the traits commonly seen in American clockmaking of the period. By that I mean the brass plates appear well cast, the columns are well done, the rack and strike initiation levers are well done, etc. The heavily incised layout lines are not commonly seen here either. We see a lot of clocks here with smooth drums, while yours are grooved. The very little that can be seen of your seatboard is more suggestive of being American. (thick, and apparently pine?) So, overall, no real proof points in either direction. We also imported a lot of English work back in the day, whole movements, or kits of parts, completed the clockwork and applied our faces and names, and claimed it as ours
 

David A Vallone

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Thank you very much for the information. I suspect English also and was told that it dated to about the same time as the dial. Here is a couple pictures of the dial and case.
Determining country of origin, English vs. American clock movement, can be very difficult. From your two photos, I suspect it to be English, but made well away from London or any other seat of major clockmaking. It is more roughly made than most English/Irish/Scottish movements, but does not exhibit several of the traits commonly seen in American clockmaking of the period. By that I mean the brass plates appear well cast, the columns are well done, the rack and strike initiation levers are well done, etc. The heavily incised layout lines are not commonly seen here either. We see a lot of clocks here with smooth drums, while yours are grooved. The very little that can be seen of your seatboard is more suggestive of being American. (thick, and apparently pine?) So, overall, no real proof points in either direction. We also imported a lot of English work back in the day, whole movements, or kits of parts, completed the clockwork and applied our faces and names, and claimed it as ours
image.jpg image.jpg
 

Jim DuBois

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Looks like a nice dial, a very nice case. Good name and location on the dial also! Deserving of a well-fit-up movement to the dial I think!
 

David A Vallone

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Looks like a nice dial, a very nice case. Good name and location on the dial also! Deserving of a well-fit-up movement to the dial I think!
Yes, everything on the rest of it is completely untouched and original. Thankfully no repairs or restoration to the case or dial and it’s going to stay that way as long as I have it.
 

novicetimekeeper

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Nothing on it screams not English to me.


Has a really long backcock, no idea why. No idea what the screw next to the backcock is for either. The shape of the anchor is unusual, looks more like a deadbeat.
 

shutterbug

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No idea what the screw next to the backcock is for either
It is interesting alright. I was thinking that if the screw head were offset like a cam, it might help make very small adjustments to the anchor height. Other than that I'm puzzled too :)
 

novicetimekeeper

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It is interesting alright. I was thinking that if the screw head were offset like a cam, it might help make very small adjustments to the anchor height. Other than that I'm puzzled too :)
Glad it isn't just me then!
 

Jim DuBois

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The screw should hold the bell bracket on the inside of the plate. Not common, but I have seen it before. You will notice there is no other mounting for the bell?
 

shutterbug

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Interesting spot for a bell bracket. Thanks, Jim.
 

novicetimekeeper

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The screw should hold the bell bracket on the inside of the plate. Not common, but I have seen it before. You will notice there is no other mounting for the bell?
Ah, good spot, is that the hole for the steady pin under the backcock then?
 

Jim DuBois

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Ah, good spot, is that the hole for the steady pin under the backcock then?
That would be how it works in my thinking. I have had one or two movements with similar arrangements over the years. I searched my photos this AM to no avail. I evidently didn't take any photos of that clock or clocks.....

inside plates bell stand detail_LI.jpg
 

SuffolkM

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I particularly like to see the scribe marks on old movements, and this one is amazingly nice in that respect. The Met Museum has a good example of a case that looks similar, dated 1790: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/8159

I wouldn't jump to say this movement is American but there are a few items on the front face to do with the rack which are just different enough from an English clock to be slightly non-idiomatic. Either way, a fantastic antique. Congrats.
 

Jim DuBois

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Is that screwed from the inside?
Yes, it is. I am still looking for an example where it is threaded in the bell stand and screwed through the plate like the example in this thread appears to have been done.
 

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