Antique lathe/cabinet?

Discussion in 'Horological Tools' started by wow, Sep 7, 2018.

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  1. wow

    wow Registered User
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    #1 wow, Sep 7, 2018
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 7, 2018
    I posted info about acquiring a long-time clock repairman’s complete shop in the clock repair section of the MB. I will probably be asking many questions about the many tools I got later.
    This post is about a very old lathe/ cabinet that I got. After looking it over carefully, I think it is not all original. The cabinet is very heavy, primarily due to the large drive wheel and it is made of heavy solid wood. The wheel has a small belt grove in it that appears to have driven a small lathe or something similar. I do not know about the lathe on top. I see no name anywhere. The gentleman I acquired it from has dementia to the degree that he does not remember anything about it.
    What do you think?
    (link added by shutterbug)
    6197C299-5013-46F3-8BF6-7E8D91DE1F57.jpeg DA65512C-4735-4709-84E8-194B1E240BE6.jpeg 3E2BA343-42AC-4625-A435-9CB6D45A7556.jpeg 13B7A1D4-76BF-43F8-890B-1A59951AA4B6.jpeg
     
  2. shutterbug

    shutterbug Super Moderator
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    Maybe a foot peddle to operate the lathe?
     
  3. wow

    wow Registered User
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    Yes, I think so. The two slots on top next to the lathe at there for the belt. I do not think the lathe is original, though. The pedal wheel works well and evidently was used during pre-electricity times.
     
  4. kevin h

    kevin h Registered User

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    Since the lathe does not line up with the belt grooves , I suspect it is a replacement, there where so many early lathes only a few made it through the time test of usefulness, or the pedal drive operated a buffer ( for a jeweller) or grinder , it would have been hard to use a pedal operated lathe in my opinion ,it is still a nice piece of history .
     
  5. gmorse

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    Hi Will,

    The pedal flywheel could possibly have worked a lathe, but I can't see how you could use a lathe properly mounted in its current position, unless you sat on the other side of the bench, because it's just too far away from the front. The single slot with the mark of a lathe foot nearer the front seems more practical, but I think that would have to have had a motor.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
  6. trim

    trim Registered User
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    For sure, I have seen exactly this treadle setup currently in use, as you might notice from another thread in here - so that was its original function and apparently works well. Overall, the bench and foot wheel look very much like those I have seen old catalogues, so I would say you have a very nice setup.

    The milling vice mounted on the corner is fairly modern.
     
  7. wow

    wow Registered User
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    #7 wow, Sep 7, 2018
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2018
    Trim, I would love to see that thread. Have any idea where to look?
     
  8. trim

    trim Registered User
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    I just mentioned that I saw this foot setup still in use by a Amish watchmaker named Joe, in WI recently, with the whole workshop being foot powered - including a modern milling machine, with exactly the same foot unit you have. One thought, while the holes don't line up with the current lathe, perhaps an intermediate/transmission pulley was also installed at some point. This is the only photo I took of the setup of the foot wheel in Joe's workshop.

    IMG_0037.jpg

    I'll see if I can find a catalogue photo of a similar bench - can't recall where I saw it atm.
     
  9. Troy Livingston

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    Nice bench. It is rare to find them with the treadle still inside. Your lathe is in the wrong spot, the ring mark towards front of the bench is where it should be. You are missing the lathe jack, an intermediate set of pulleys, these are frequently seen on the online auction site. The nut on the lathe base can be loosened so you can pivot the lathe out of the way when it is not in use.

    A photo of a recently acquired bench.
    Treadle Lathe IMG_8182.JPG

    The first time I turned on a treadle lathe was an eye opening experience. I was a bit frustrated with the typical sewing machine motor arrangement on most watchmakers lathes. A friend suggested I try his treadle lathe, all the torque you could ever need at any speed, much nicer than the typical sewing machine motor screaming in your ear. It can be work though. Turning with a T-rest and graver is quite pleasant. Using a cross slide requires you to stand so you can see past the tool post.

    It took me years to find my first lathe treadle and during that time I discovered the Sherline lathe motor.
    A bit more practical, all the benefits of the treadle plus it runs on electricity.
    Set your lathe up properly and try the treadle. If you don't like it you can always drive the lathe with a motor.
     
  10. wow

    wow Registered User
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    Troy, thanks for such great info. When I got it, the lathe was installed properly. I couldn’t figure out how the belt could drive it in that position so I moved the lathe to the back where the slots were. Now I understand. I am now in the market for a lathe jack.
     
  11. wow

    wow Registered User
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    Two of the other lathes I got were Sherlines. One is a 4000 and the other is a 4345. Now I have to learn how to operate them. I do have an old Unimat SL that I have used for years, so I am not a total greenie to this type. They are similar but quite different. Guess I’ll start reading on the Sherline and get basics. Any help on the 4345 would be appreciated.
     
  12. Troy Livingston

    Troy Livingston Registered User
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    Since there have been no replies.
    You might try looking at Tabletop Machining by Joe Martin. (Available from Sherline)
    Also if Jerry Kieffer still teaches his lathe class at the NAWCC school you might consider signing up.
    Years ago I took his wheel and pinion cutting class and found it very worthwhile.
    Otherwise I have limited experience with the Sherline lathe and have been unable to find anything about the 4345.
     
  13. wow

    wow Registered User
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    Thanks, Troy. I am still unloading tools and parts. I was wrong about that model number. Both Sherlines are model 4000. One has a 4245 model number on the motor. Here are some photos of a few of the tools I’ve unloaded. Accesssries are still to be unpacked.

    6973229C-F9AA-4BF2-8171-705DC4CD9EB8.jpeg 842A554D-5FAE-48F3-A757-F522E82CABFC.jpeg 0FD9D635-D218-4782-B82C-5B650C81181D.jpeg A9BE17FE-D63F-4A06-8023-F1E42D3A4BAB.jpeg 7ED5CF43-F7E8-4320-91D7-0FF91EB9E200.jpeg 4A1D6EAA-B7B3-49B1-8DDC-6D0B01464CCC.jpeg
     
  14. wow

    wow Registered User
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    I am still unloading boxes and found two sets of jewelers lathe collets today. WOW!
    Question: there is a set of several chucks for the Sherline lathes and milling machine. I have not found a draw bolt or bar for those. Should there be one? The chucks are threaded with about 1/4 inch threads.
     
  15. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Yes, there should be drawbars. I think you can find what you need on the Sherline website.

    Uhralt
     
  16. wow

    wow Registered User
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    Thanks, Rudi. I did go to the website and found it is a 1/4 x 20 x 5 1/4. I ran to Lowe’s and got three. Work great.
     
  17. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Glad I could help.
     

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