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Antique cuckoo quail movement quail call issue

Don1

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Jun 20, 2021
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My Hubert Herr cuckoo quail movent keeps skipping the quail call at the quarter hour every quarter hour call. It also will jump to sound three calls on occasion. I have manually reset using the side bar lever but it still fails at the quarter quail call.

20210723_084052.jpg
 

shutterbug

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It's a delicate setting. Study the mechanics of how it sets up for the quail strike. When you understand what it's trying to do, you should see why it fails. Alternately, make a video of it, post it to Youtube, and link to it here so we can see what's happening.
 

Dick Feldman

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Sep 1, 2000
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Hello Don,

I do not know your experience level with clock repair so do not be insulted if I speak below your level.
Your movement is a three train movement and it seems one train has become unreliable. Normally when that happens, the train in question will skip a sequence once in a while and be out of synchronization much of the time.
You mentioned that the movement is antique. To me that means it is old and probably has had many years of operation. Clock movements are machines and will wear just like all machines.
If I had that movement in my hands, the first thing I would look for is wear. Wear at the pivot holes. The wear causes friction in the trains causing poor operation. That is the most common cause of failure in clock movements.
Clean, oil and adjustment are often offered as solutions for wear. (Sometimes called servicing a movement). Those processes are not bad for clock movements but are normally not curative. Those processes are preventative. After wear overtakes a clock movement the time for clean, oil and adjust has long passed. Adjusting a clock movement to compensate for wear is normally a short term solution.
If you use the search function, you will find many past discussions about wear and how to diagnose/treat that.
Best Regards,
Dick
 
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Don1

Registered User
Jun 20, 2021
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Hello Don,

I do not know your experience level with clock repair so do not be insulted if I speak below your level.
Your movement is a three train movement and it seems one train has become unreliable. Normally when that happens, the train in question will skip a sequence once in a while and be out of synchronization much of the time.
You mentioned that the movement is antique. To me that means it is old and probably has had many years of operation. Clock movements are machines and will wear just like all machines.
If I had that movement in my hands, the first thing I would look for is wear. Wear at the pivot holes. The wear causes friction in the trains causing poor operation. That is the most common cause of failure in clock movements.
Clean, oil and adjustment are often offered as solutions for wear. (Sometimes called servicing a movement). Those processes are not bad for clock movements but are normally not curative. Those processes are preventative. After wear overtakes a clock movement the time for clean, oil and adjust has long passed. Adjusting a clock movement to compensate for wear is normally a short term solution.
If you use the search function, you will find many past discussions about wear and how to diagnose/treat that.
Best Regards,
Dick
Thank you for your insight and information. It is much appreciated.
 

Robert Horneman

Registered User
Jul 6, 2017
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Turn the minute hand to a quarter hour. Watch the quail lever that operates the bellow. It should sound the quail. Next watch the quail count wheel it should rotate. If the cuckoo is working properly you know the wheel is operating properly. It appears the quail lever is not falling in the slots on the count wheel.
Your movement is rusty and dirty. Have you ever cleaned and oiled this movement? That may fix the problem. If not, then the movement Needs to be disassembled ,Pivots polished and maybe new bushings.
 

Don1

Registered User
Jun 20, 2021
12
0
1
67
Country
Turn the minute hand to a quarter hour. Watch the quail lever that operates the bellow. It should sound the quail. Next watch the quail count wheel it should rotate. If the cuckoo is working properly you know the wheel is operating properly. It appears the quail lever is not falling in the slots on the count wheel.
Your movement is rusty and dirty. Have you ever cleaned and oiled this movement? That may fix the problem. If not, then the movement Needs to be disassembled ,Pivots polished and maybe new bushings.
Thank you for your answer. I've been debating whether to clean and oil. I'm going to give that a try. The quail lever I can now see that it is skipping. Wish me luck. Thanks again.
 

promenade clocks

Registered User
Aug 11, 2016
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0
1
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Hello Don,

I do not know your experience level with clock repair so do not be insulted if I speak below your level.
Your movement is a three train movement and it seems one train has become unreliable. Normally when that happens, the train in question will skip a sequence once in a while and be out of synchronization much of the time.
You mentioned that the movement is antique. To me that means it is old and probably has had many years of operation. Clock movements are machines and will wear just like all machines.
If I had that movement in my hands, the first thing I would look for is wear. Wear at the pivot holes. The wear causes friction in the trains causing poor operation. That is the most common cause of failure in clock movements.
Clean, oil and adjustment are often offered as solutions for wear. (Sometimes called servicing a movement). Those processes are not bad for clock movements but are normally not curative. Those processes are preventative. After wear overtakes a clock movement the time for clean, oil and adjust has long passed. Adjusting a clock movement to compensate for wear is normally a short term solution.
If you use the search function, you will find many past discussions about wear and how to diagnose/treat that.
Best Regards,
Dick
I concur. Well said and good advise. It does not hurt to oil it. If this is not the cure, do not waste your time with cleaning without bushing.
 

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