Antique Boetlgers Demagnetizer

RickThomes

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CJ,

I have an identical demagnetizer and have always wondered what it was used for.

Any idea?
 

RickThomes

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Thanks CJ,

Mine has the light bulb and everything. I have pluged it in but never tried to demantize anything but have to assume it would work. I have it on the wall with some of my clocks because I thought it was interesting looking.
When where they made??

Thanks again.
 

Tom Kloss

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Does anyone know what the wattage is the light bulb is supposed to be in these.
 

Scottie-TX

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660watts? Are you sure, "660"? That's 2.6 amps for the bulb and additional for the coil! Now if ya ran it on 125V - it'd be over 5 AMPS draw.
 

Mike Phelan

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Originally posted by SidneyClockCo.:
Milwalukee Wis. is where they were made.
The bulb has a special screw in you can see the photos click on link and then double click photo to enlarge. Mine has a Hubbel screw in for the bulb and reads 660W250V The bulb has two slot to fit in. I'll photo the box and stuff better tonight. Pat. May 13 1902
Hope this helps.
Cheers
:cool:
Wow! If you know anyone with a lighthouse you can sell the bulb to them ;)
There is probably nothing critical about the bulb. A demagnetiser is just a coil of wire connected to the AC supply; the bulb will cause the current to decay slightly as it warms up, like the degaussing you hear when your TV turns on.
Whatever domestic bulb you use, you cannot do any harm. Could it be 60W?
HTH
 

Tom Kloss

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The 660 watt is the standard rating for screw type light bulb base. It's a maximum safety rating of the socket. With out seeing the wiring schematic I would guess the bulb to be to be some sort of a surge current limiting device.

Tom
 

Mike Phelan

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Originally posted by Klossee:
The 660 watt is the standard rating for screw type light bulb base. It's a maximum safety rating of the socket. With out seeing the wiring schematic I would guess the bulb to be to be some sort of a surge current limiting device.

Tom
Bulbs will do that, as will other devices. This sounds more like a baretter.
These look like a bulb, but the filament is iron, in a hydrogen atmosphere, and gives almost constant current.
They were used in radio and TV to prevent the surge when the heaters came on. 660W is a big one, but I guess I will only drop a few volts.
 
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RickThomes

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CJ,
This is a picture of my Demagnetizer with what looks like the original bulb or a good replacement. Looks like a hand blown bulb with the top tip on the bulb. There are no markings on the bulb at all but three or four filaments.

http://mywebsite.register.com/db1/00097/rareclockmuseum.com/_uimages/DeMagnitizer.jpg
 

Mike Phelan

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Hi Rick
Very nice! That does look like a barretter. What is the device with the notches you can see on the right?
 

RickThomes

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Mike,

I am not sure, but would assume that it adjust the intensity of the demagnitizer. We need to ask CJ. He has an instruction book.
 
R

Richard Moore

Just guessing, but the lamp probably acts as a ballast. As the magnetic field of the coil's large inductance builds up, more current will flow, the lamp will light brighter and finally most of the voltage applied will be dropped across the lamp instead of the coil. The effect would be to (relatively) slowly build up and then decrease the AC magnetic field inside the coil, where the object to be demagnetized, like a screwdriver, goes.

A further guess is that the slider on the right side is attached to the contact on a carbon pile resistive load that regulates the maximum strength of the field.
 

Mike Phelan

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Originally posted by Richard Moore:
Just guessing, but the lamp probably acts as a ballast. As the magnetic field of the coil's large inductance builds up, more current will flow,
Less current!
the lamp will light brighter and finally most of the voltage applied will be dropped across the lamp instead of the coil. The effect would be to (relatively) slowly build up and then decrease the AC magnetic field inside the coil, where the object to be demagnetized, like a screwdriver, goes.

A further guess is that the slider on the right side is attached to the contact on a carbon pile resistive load that regulates the maximum strength of the field.
Only thing seems to be that there are only two actual contacts, interleaved with each other.
It would certainly wake you up if it was connected to 117 VAC! :eek: Looking forward to CJs pic.
 

Tom Kloss

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IMHO:
There devices were probably use to demag watches or tools, whatever.

Without seeing the schematic , I would guess the following. A basic series circuit of bulb, coil and a heavy slider rheostat . To demag U have to reduce the magnetic field slowly to a zero flux. The item to be demagnetized is placed in the coil,the current applied. The bulb limits the current to a safe or controlled amount and the magnetic field flux builds up slowly. Then the rheostat is adjusted to slowly reduce the flux to zero. No?

Tom.
 

RickThomes

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Thanks CJ,

Is there a patent number anywhere on the package? I would like to look it up.
 

Mike Phelan

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Hi CJ & other fellow avocados
I see how it works now!

The bulb or barretter is simply to give a sort of constant-current supply to allow various different voltage supplies - nothing to do with surges or anything.

On AC, you would move the device or the work away, to decrease the magnetic flux towards zero.

On DC, the slider is not a rheostat - that would make it very hot, and as I said before, it only has two contacts.
The slider is a commutator to reverse the coil for every step, to use on DC to give a sort of AC so the flux reverses the work.
It also appears to have an off-switch.

Does that make sense?
 

Scottie-TX

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Wull, "Sure it does". An' I know it's easy to say now that all th' smoke's cleared - but I never could see th' purpose/interest in buffering surge voltage/current here. I mean - this' a chunka wire here! Certainly have enjoyed the digression tho.
 

Mike Phelan

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Originally posted by Scottie-TX:
Wull, "Sure it does". An' I know it's easy to say now that all th' smoke's cleared - but I never could see th' purpose/interest in buffering surge voltage/current here. I mean - this' a chunka wire here! Certainly have enjoyed the digression tho.
Probably looked impressive, Scottie, or maybe voltages in US varied? Dunno. England used to have DC mains in some areas up to the 1950s.
On DC, there would be no reactance, so more current unless you limited it. The big coil on AC would give a fair bit of inductance to limit current.
 
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Tom Kloss

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OK mike I'll buy it. I never even thought of DC current. The slider is the only way it would work with DC. Over here AC DC is a rock group.

Tom
 

Mike Phelan

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Originally posted by Klossee:
OK mike I'll buy it. I never even thought of DC current. The slider is the only way it would work with DC. Over here AC DC is a rock group.

Tom
Never mind, Tom, you could always switch them off as well...... ;) :biggrin:
 

Mike Phelan

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