Ansonia Strike Train Help Requested

Savageblunder

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Nov 10, 2019
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9AFE7092-41C6-425B-B535-9C3F19C8732A.jpeg

Hi folks. Hoping some smart person here can help me. What I have here is an Ansonia 5 open escapement 8 day time/gong movement from a mantle clock. I think it’s pretty standard.

The problem seems to be with the chime/strike side. Basically, what’s going on is the count wheel (red B) does not turn on its own. It free spins around the winding arbor for the chime side - I believe it is supposed to do this? It’s not binding. You can lift the strike lever up out of a deep tooth & spin it around its axis.

I believe from guessing, that it’s (red B) supposed to be driven by the brass gear (blue C) meshed with it. The problem is, little gear C is not “fixed” around the pivot post that goes through it either... It free spins as well. So the count wheel free spins & the gear that drives it free spins both on their respective posts... The net result is both posts turn fine - but neither gear turns on its own.

Since the count wheel doesn’t turn on its own, obviously the strike train either doesn’t stop striking or doesn’t start. The count wheel can’t do its job.

I’m thinking the count wheel is not supposed to be driven / fixed to the winding arbor for the strike train - because you would break something every time you went to wind the gong. I’m thinking the purpose of gear C is to drive the count wheel. But, gear C just free spins around it’s pivot post.

Assuming I’m correct, I can’t see how gear C would be fixed to its pivot post. Maybe it’s just a pressed fit or there is some mechanism I can’t see without pulling the plates off. Or is there a tiny key on the arbor that turns the gear and it broke?

What would be the best way to fix this gear back to it’s pivot post, or should I just look for the part (gear/pivot post) from a scrap movement?

thanks for the help...
 

Hans_

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Jul 3, 2012
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The COUNT WHEEL (red) is a sliding fit on its hub, and is driven by the pinion (blue).
The pinion is a press fit on its arbor/ shaft.

Hans
 

Savageblunder

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Nov 10, 2019
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Ok. Makes sense. That’s what I thought. So, the “press fit” has failed. I’m guessing the fix isn’t to simply tap it back on the arbor until tight. I’m also guessing that the center of the brass gear or the arbor is worn.

Other than locating replacement parts; is there a reliable fix?
 

Hans_

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Jul 3, 2012
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There's not great forces acting on that pinion. Repairers in my region regularly get by using solder and super glue.

The proper way of course, is to dismantle and properly press fit.

You can close the hole on the pinion using a punch or peening hammer, then press it onto the shaft. Careful, not to hit teeth though!

Hans
 

John P

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Remove drive gear, use red Loctite and reinstall gear, wait 24 hours, reassemble movement.
 

shutterbug

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Here again, Han's way is best, and John's way will work fine.
There's always an issue when Loctite is mentioned ;)
 

R. Croswell

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Wondering if anyone has tried JB Weld instead of Loctite? I have that on hand.
I would not use JB Weld for this repair and I would not peen the brass wheel, and I would not use superglue.

The small gear is loose so the first thing to do is determine why it is loose. Look for a crack. If the gear isn't cracked, I believe the preferred method would be to knurl the arbor (posr, shaft by any other name). Ordinarily that requires a lathe and knurling tool, but you can easily knurl the shaft manually. With the gear removed, lay the arbor against a block of hardwood, then place the edge of a flat file against the arbor and strike the opposite edge of the file. The file should leave an impression of its teeth in the arbor. Repeat until the arbor is knurled all the way around. Not too hard, it doesn't need deep knurling, and you don't want to bend the arbor. Then press the brass gear back on to the correct position.

A Loc-tite permanent retraining compound would probably work if the parts are clean and totally grease free and that would be my second choice. As pointed out there isn't a lot of load on that pinion.

If the brass gear is cracked then its plan "B" which would be a replacement gear from a parts movement or perhaps repairing the gear with a bushing. Some would just solder the gear to the arbor but watch out for the tar and feathers.

RC
 
Last edited:

Hans_

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Jul 3, 2012
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New Delhi
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Wondering if anyone has tried JB Weld instead of Loctite? I have that on hand.
I've never used JB Weld, but hear claims that it's as strong as the metal it bonds.

I generally discourage use of adhesives where they didn't exist originally.

Hans
 

R. Croswell

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Apr 4, 2006
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I've never used JB Weld, but hear claims that it's as strong as the metal it bonds.

I generally discourage use of adhesives where they didn't exist originally.

Hans
I've used JB-Weld frequently and it is great stuff but I wouldn't say as strong as steel. But it is thick and not really appropriate where the "adhesive / filler / retaining compound" needs to penetrate between close fitting parts. Knurling alone should accomplish this repair but a drop of Loc-tite as "belt and suspenders" won't hurt.

RC
 
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