Ansonia springs................sounds like a spa.

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by amzgraz, Nov 9, 2018 at 12:02 AM.

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  1. amzgraz

    amzgraz Registered User
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    Feb 19, 2018
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    Greetings: I am working on an Asonia metel, open escapement, clock made in New York. From what I,ve read, after 1879 all of Anonia's clocks were made in N.Y. as opposed to Conn. It seems as if business competetion was very alive during the late 1800s as many businesses failed or were bought out. ansonia sold out in 1929 just months before the Crash. In hind sight they were lucky. enough....
    The Bushings were quite dirty but appear in reasonable shape. The strike side operared with no effort but could not get the time side to budge. It seems as there is insufficient force traver through the gearing. I disassembled the movement and removed the springs. This is the first time I've seen different sizes...anyway, I measued the width of the unwound springs at rest and found one at 6.5" and 6" rerspectivley. Are they bad or good:???::???::???:?
    Noteworthy!! The movement plates were embossed on the outer faces. This seems unnecessarly expensive for an enclosed unit.....HUMMMM.
    thanks for your opinions.
    dennis

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  2. roughbarked

    roughbarked Registered User

    Dec 2, 2016
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    People had to hang the pendulum so it was not uncommon to emboss back plates. It would seem a waste to emboss the front plates but if the system was set up to emboss, it wouldn't have cost a lot more to do the front plates.
     
  3. mauleg

    mauleg Registered User
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    As long as the ends are in good shape and there are no cracks, I'd clean, oil and use them.
     
  4. roughbarked

    roughbarked Registered User

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    Have only ever replaced a mainspring that is broken badly or is rusty. I often repair mainsprings.
     
  5. Joseph Bautsch

    Joseph Bautsch Registered User

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    Main springs do have a life span. When coiled up in a clock they start losing their "memory" for their un-coiled position and will start assuming the coiled up shape. From looking at the photo of the springs from your works I would not use them again. What I see is a couple of springs that have lost their uncoiled memory or very close to it. Look at the spring coils around the winding arbor, they are very close to oneanother. This is indicitive of a dead or near dead spring. They may still work for now but they are on borrowed time. I would replace them.
     
  6. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    I would strongly disagree with the statements given in the last post #5.
    Post #3 and #4 are correct. Furthermore, introducing new springs will bring in a lot of new variables, one of which is sudden or premature failure. You can look up 'Willies Turns of Power' if you want to test your springs. Also, look up 'spring service'. Willie X
     
  7. amzgraz

    amzgraz Registered User
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    OKKKKK lets arm wrestle:D I will consult with existing data and proceed with mucho gusto.........
    thanks to all. dennis
     
  8. tracerjack

    tracerjack Registered User

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    Whether the springs need to be changed or not because of their power is, I think, premature. If they have no damage to them, then the original springs would be better for detecting problems with the movement, since as stated, new springs could bring problems of their own with them. The OP states the movement was disassembled, and bushing were dirty. Was it cleaned? Were the springs cleaned and lubed? I'm assuming 'yes'. I have never worked on an open escapement, specifically because of the many problems discussed on this forum. So, personally, with as many inherent problems that are said to come with this type of movement, I think I would look everywhere else for a problem before I changed the springs.
     
  9. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    amz,
    Could you explain your thread title?
    Like what does a "spa" sound like?
    Willie X
     
  10. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    Ansonia Springs sounds like the name for a spa.
     
  11. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    Oooooh, don't see the word spa on this list to much. Thanks Steven
     
  12. bangster

    bangster Super Moderator
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    Those mainsprings look collapsed to me. But I won't get into the replacement debate.:oops:
     
  13. Joseph Bautsch

    Joseph Bautsch Registered User

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    Willie X, we have to agree to disagree on this one. I've been repairing clocks for the past 46 years and have replaced probably several hundred springs. I only buy the best quality spring available and have never had a problem, as you describe, with one of them. As for repairing a spring, if it still has useful running life then repairing a broken hole end or loop end will work. If it is cracked or broken in "any" part of the main body I replace it, I never shorten it. But no one can put the lost power back in a spring. I have had a lot more problems with weak and dead springs than with a new one. In this case I have seen springs in this condition before. There may be some life there but not much. It would be better to change them now rather than shortly down the road.
     
  14. amzgraz

    amzgraz Registered User
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    WELL, I pegged the bushing holes and placed in Ultrasonic for several minutes, doused with baking soda laced water to counter the ammonia, flushed with water and blow dried all of the parts (except the clutch). Polished the exposed escapement components and reassembled. Previoulsy, there was very little if any spring energy at the escapement. The cleaning, which included both springs and oiling of same as well as all pivot points had a remarkable effect. With a generic bob, it will operate. Havn't fully established a beat. As for the strike side, it did work prior to cleaning but on reassembly it was tight and non functional. During an initial inspection of the disassembled plates for badly worn bushings, I noted that one end of the fly, the bushing sets in a "tab", (see pic.) which was not parallel to the the plate. I carefull y bent the tab to conform with the overall flatness of the plate. consequently on reassembly, there was insufficient room between the plates to accommodate the fly. Loosening one corner solved the problem. Of the many data to be learned, repeated viewings of the various functions of the two trains translates into certainty of success. If I could only remember this, less anguish would pevail. Problem!!! :(There is no single gong strike on the 1/2 hr. Both there and on the hour, results in an hour gong strike. Now I have a clock that gongs 24 times in 12 hrs. This is right up there with placing the count wheel on backwards. I now have the option to sell "mystery" clocks. I really need a to keep a working movement of hand for reference.
    BTW Willie, at a spa one might hear lots of AAAhhhs and plearure moans such as "thats the spot, yeah right there":D. Sorry about the sentence structure... in high school, english grammer was similar to French.

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