Ansonia o/e clock

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by heifetz17, Apr 29, 2020.

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  1. heifetz17

    heifetz17 Registered User
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    Apr 8, 2015
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    Hey guys! I’m excited to have found this! I’ve been searching for a clock with an open escapement for quite some time now and have a couple questions. This is new territory for me so guidance is appreciated!

    1) is the overhaul process the same as a standard movement or will I be looking at some differences?
    2) it appears to be missing the gong, but I don’t see anywhere obvious in the case for the gong to attach. Can someone advise on this?
    3) any idea of age? I’m estimating 1880s?

    Thanks in advance!

    DC09C604-9874-4285-A99C-2BAF20ADF628.jpeg 23C28B92-2180-4864-9770-9595504ADADE.jpeg 6A04A165-625A-4CB3-8A6F-33F3C8649CE2.jpeg 5FD74024-B58E-4A29-9787-5DB8F8386989.jpeg
     
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  2. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    Feb 22, 2010
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    Hello Heifetz17,

    I can't see all of the clock but this might be the "tower" part of an Ansonia figural clock like the Boar Hunter for example.

    What does the bottom of the clock look like? Are two or more of those feet tapped to receive a threaded fastener? Can you post a photo?

    As far as the movement is concerned, it looks like it's been pretty neglected and needs some TLC.

    Did it come with a Pendulum? It not, you'll need a Suspension Rod and Pendulum of course Some of these Figural Clocks take a fairly long Pendulum. If this clock originally came on a base, you may need to find or make one in order to get a long enough pendulum fitted. Here's an Example. I'm getting a little ahead of myself here though. Let's take a close look at the bottom of the clock first.

    The Open Escapements can be finicky, especially if the pallets are worn or if it's been messed with. These movements can also have an unusual Strike Train Lever. See this post: Clocks hate me

    Your movement appears to have a fair amount of rust. It may be a challenge to put back in good running order. Do the Trains operate if you wind the mainsprings a little? I won't recommend fully winding them until you've had a good look at them. It's always great if you can observe how the mechanism is supposed to operate before you have to take it apart. Plenty of notes and photos. Locations of the Warning/Lock pins and such in Warning and Lock.

    My guess on date of manufacture would be circa 1900 give or take about a decade.

    I'll watch your Thread to find out what we're looking at from the bottom.

    Regards,

    Bruce
     
  3. heifetz17

    heifetz17 Registered User
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    Hi Bruce,

    Thanks for your reply. Here’sa photo of the bottom of the clock. It has four threaded holes. How hard will it be to find a base? I suppose maybe I could just make one as well.

    It does not have a suspension spring or pendulum, and looks like the crutch is damaged. Let me know if you agree with that assessment.

    The trains do appear to want to operate under a little spring pressure, so while I’m sure I’m in for a challenge I think it’s a doable challenge!

    60032B79-EB92-4CA0-991F-2A56753D335B.jpeg
     
  4. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    Feb 22, 2010
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    Hello again heifetz17,

    These bases pop up on eBay from time to time. There are two currently listed but they probably fit a different style of Clock Tower. Do a search on the site for "Ansonia Clock Base".
    Here are a few of the different styles:
    Finding one that has been drilled to fit your Tower may take some time and it won't exactly be cheap. The "shadow" of the Tower base will probably be visible and the Seller can provide measurements. One never knows. It may take a long time to find a base, one may show up right away. Then there will be question of the Statue or Figure. Ideally you could find a base and statue that only needs the Clock. There will then be a matter of matching the finishes.

    Where did you get this clock from? Is it possible that the rest of the clock is still available? Maybe it was parted out.

    I suppose that you could fabricate a base with or without feet, possibly from enameled wood. Here's a model that might serve give you some ideas: Ansonia "Emporia" Clock W/ Cherubs & Mask

    The suspension rod and pendulum can easily be replaced. Damage to the Crutch or Escape could be much more serious and difficult to repair.

    You have a lot of work ahead. Develop your plan and just take things one step at a time.

    Good luck with it.

    Bruce
     
  5. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    On open escapements, the "open" part will be removed first, along with the escape wheel. After that the repair is pretty much like any other striker. Be very careful of the porcelain dial as you work on it, as well as the inner plate.
    Don't forget to let the springs down before you remove those front parts.
     
  6. Carl Bergquist

    Carl Bergquist Registered User

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    You have half or one third of a clock. You are missing the base and the statue. I find about 6 or 8 examples of this "tower" in Tran Duy Ly. It certainly was one of the higher end figure clocks but it has had a hard life. Be careful of the pallets they may be jewels rather than steel. The gong is usually attached to a wood bottom running the length of a cast iron base (missing) with a long hammer. You see quite a few of these that have been patched together from various parts. I call them marriages. It looks like your movement belongs with your tower, look for a number on the right back leg to tell you how long the pendulum may have been.
     
  7. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    I'll just add that those pallets are held in place with shellac. Don't subject them to ultrasonic cleaning, heat or chemicals. You'll regret it :D
     
  8. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    Please show us some close up photos of the movement when you're ready to start working on it.
     
  9. Phil G4SPZ

    Phil G4SPZ Registered User
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    I have found that the Brocot escapement is less tolerant of pivot hole wear than some other escapements. Be prepared to do some re-bushing! Good luck,

    Phil
     
  10. heifetz17

    heifetz17 Registered User
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    Thank you all. This was actually a Goodwill find so there's no hope in finding the correct base, but this information definitely gets me pointed in the right direction.

    I'll probably tear into it this weekend and I'll take some good photos to post. And thank you SB, I would have unknowingly cleaned the pallets in my US and ruined my day!
     
  11. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    #11 Bruce Alexander, Apr 30, 2020
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2020
    Since you're planning to delve into the movement now, you should note whether or not the pallets are worn with ruts. If so, you'll probably have issues and may need to replace them. That can be a lot of "fun". There should be a "healthy" but not robust pendulum swing. Jeweled (Red) pallets are held in place by shellac. As Shutterbug points out, they can lose their settings in heated Ultrasonic baths. Steel Pallets are often (but not always) held in place via a tight friction fit with the Verge. It's okay to clean them in your Ultrasonic, but if in doubt err on the side of caution. They are not hard to carefully clean by hand. It looks like there some rust/corrosion. That needs to be removed. As usual, you'll want to take plenty of photos AND notes on where lock/warning pins are located when the Strike Train is in Lock and Warning.

    We'll be watching if you have any questions.

    Bruce
     

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