Ansonia cast iron

ScotSun

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Nov 28, 2017
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Found this 23-pound baby in a little antique shop in VA that was having a sale. It was filthy but appeared to be complete and would run for almost a minute before slowing to a stop.

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...if anyone knows that actual model name for this one, I would appreciate it. I have seen quite a few similar but most have fancy brass feet and side pieces.

This one has those two reddish side panels. They are MUCH darker, almost black when viewed in normal light. I think they may originally have been a faux-red-marble but they now appear to be corroded steel. If anyone knows what they were originally... I am currently considering trying to sand them off and possibly do a new faux-red-marble effect...

Also, and maybe this would be better in the repairs forum... the backplate came up well with a little brasso...
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...but I am hesitant to attack the faceplate because the dial face itself seems to be a heavy card or painted on tin and I do not want to damage that. Does anyone know the best way to clean that up?

And...(so many questions, I know...) does anyone know the significance of the "G43" on the rear plate?

The movement cleaning is going well and I should be able to get it tested soon... I would be much faster if I had a sonic tank... :)
 

John P

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Scot, your clock is the "VENICE". 1904 cost $11.00
If you strip it down and use polishing compound, it will shine like brand new.
 

ScotSun

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Scot, your clock is the "VENICE". 1904 cost $11.00
If you strip it down and use polishing compound, it will shine like brand new.
Thank you John! Do you mean on those red side panels? for the polishing compound? And is there any particular brand you would recommend?

The top piece appears to have corrosion in the black that has gone through the outer coating so I am not sure a little polish would fix that. The brass should come up like the back that I did but I am concerned about using it on the brass surrounding the dial face...
 

John P

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I would not use any compound on the red pieces, but do wax them.
I use Turtle Wax polishing compound to clean up and polish the black paint used on the case. Then a coat of good quality car wax.
It will look like a spit polished army boot. Don't be concerned about a bit of imperfection here and there.
The dials on old clocks should look like an old clock in my opinion. Old but clean..
 
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Bruce Alexander

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Congrats! Nice clock. We love Ansonias. They pretty much have something for everyone's taste.

Non-abrasive Goop or GoJo hand cleaner will help you gently lift off dirt, grime and film from the finish. It will take a bit longer with a little more elbow grease than an abrasive rubbing or polishing compound but it does work well. Apply it one section at a time with clean cotton rags and keep changing the rag until no more dirt is evident. I'd start with the simulated marble inlays. The Black Enamel is pretty tough stuff and can be safely cleaned with polishing compound as John suggested to you. Again, let the clean rags tell you when all the dirt and contamination has been removed before you go to the next section. You can stabilize the rusted areas with a simple waxing of the entire finish (rust included) when you're done cleaning. You might also consider applying a little rust converter or remover to the rusted metal only. If you decide to treat/remove the rust, I would mask off the surrounding intact black enamel paint and try it on an inconspicuous area first.
 

ScotSun

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Thank you both very much for the advice.

I am not sure that the two little red panels won't need completely stripping and redoing some sort of faux finish. They appear to be metal and "up close and in person" are rough with corrosion. I will try to clean gently first to see if they are recoverable but am doubtful. I do want to clean the brass around the exterior front glass as that is also seriously corroded but I suspect I can leave the brass inside as it has only gone that nice warm old-brass color and not seriously corroded.
 

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