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another use for delrinAF

bruce linde

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my chelsea ships bell strike sounded mushy... and indeed the 1909 hammer tip leather was mushed out of shape.

i turned a new tip out of 1/4" round delrinAF stock.... must have taken an entire five minutes all in.

pressure screwed right in, sounds great. :)

IMG_0051 8.27.54 PM.jpeg
 

wow

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my chelsea ships bell strike sounded mushy... and indeed the 1909 hammer tip leather was mushed out of shape.

i turned a new tip out of 1/4" round delrinAF stock.... must have taken an entire five minutes all in.

pressure screwed right in, sounds great. :)

View attachment 665799
Bruce, where do you buy delrin 1/4 inch stock?
 

Dave T

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Will, I don't know where Bruce buys it, but a quick search shows many resources. Just saw a 10 pack for $3.28 on ebay.
 

bruce linde

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McMaster-Carr.... but it does look like there are cheaper solutions.

btw... you want delrinAF, which has some teflon in it. you can use it for bushings, pinion gears, all kinds of stuff. lathes eat it for breakfast snacks... incredibly easy and quick to work with.

i got a 2' piece at McMaster-Carr for $3... + twice that in shipping (doh!)
 

RJSoftware

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Teflon scares me, supposedly in near everyone's bloodstream due to no stick pans. Also, I have a tendency to not wash my hands and lick my fingers and pick my nose.
 
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bruce linde

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i can't quite hit the 'like' button on that last post.... :)
 
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Dave T

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Teflon scares me, supposedly in near everyone's bloodstream due to no stick pans.
Not me. I use cast iron. A good well seasoned pan won't stick. But it's also a matter of how hot you need to get it before you put anything in it.
Now we can start an iron discussion! ;)
 

bruce linde

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btw... a delrinAF hammer tip is going to be louder and brighter than a leather tip.... just an fyi.
 

Bruce Alexander

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I've used straight Delrin for Sonora Chime hammers. The stuff machines beautifully. I've used a die to cut threads. The Delrin tips I've placed will definitely outlast me, but then, leather tips will too.
 

dad1891

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I found a plastics fabricator nearby that will give me scrap Delrin almost free. However, he normally deals with rods that are 1 1/2" dia, so I have a lot of material to remove to make a small part. While it cuts super easy, it's stringy and has a tendency to birds-nest around the part. After fighting this for a while I came up with using a small shop vac to suck up the long stringy chip while it is coming off the cutting tool. Makes machining Delrin a lot more pleasant.
 

R. Croswell

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McMaster-Carr.... but it does look like there are cheaper solutions.

btw... you want delrinAF, which has some teflon in it. you can use it for bushings, pinion gears, all kinds of stuff. lathes eat it for breakfast snacks... incredibly easy and quick to work with.

i got a 2' piece at McMaster-Carr for $3... + twice that in shipping (doh!)
I use this stuff for bushings in wooden clocks and all sorts of things. Don't recall ever using for hammer tips but it should last forever. The only problem with the AF (anti friction) version is that the Teflon tends to prevent glue from sticking well. McMaster-Carr also lists it as "slippery Delrin".

Teflon scares me, supposedly in near everyone's bloodstream due to no stick pans.
About the only safety issue with Delrin is that a small amount of supposedly somewhat toxic gas is released during some machining operations. Probably insignificant when machining clock size parts but good ventilation is always nice in the shop.

Teflon in the bloodstream....... perhaps the medical industry should take a closer look; might help the blood to flow and prevent clots. As for iron cooking pans, I don't like to cook and they don't work so well in the microwave!

RC
 
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shutterbug

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Cast iron pans are nice for cooking, but not nice to modern smooth top stoves. They scratch them up. Great for camping though!
 

Bruce Alexander

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I think the cast irons work well with induction cooktops. One would probably need to be careful on them too since they have a smooth, "glass" top. If you're cooking over a campfire and coals, the bottom is probably going to be a little rough. :)
 

TEACLOCKS

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Can't find DELRIN anywhere
 

S_Owsley

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I don't even know where to begin when someone is afraid to handle virgin Teflon material with their hands. Are some of you guys using whale oil as a lubricant and ivory soap as their parts cleaning solution? While I do own a non-stick pan for special purposes, one of the first things I bought when I moved out of my parent's house was a new cast-iron skillet. It's over 40 years old now and is seasoned well enough by now. Countless pans of cornbread have been baked in it.
 
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RJSoftware

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Oh my Derlin, oh my derlin, oh my Derlin Clementine.
You where gone & lost 4ever,
now I'm usin the cast iron.

and for those who didn't know the controversy Clementine.

: "Though in life I used to hug her, now she's dead—I'll draw the line."
 
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Willie X

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I think there might be a law agin that. Might depend on your state though. Ha

For a hammer head, regular ole (available everywhere) Nylon 6+6 would probably function the same as Derlin.

Willie X
 

Schatznut

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i can't quite hit the 'like' button on that last post.... :)
Yeah, a bit too much info there... If you're worried about the PTFE in Delrin, how do you deal with the fact that most brass has lead in it to increase machineability? Delrin and brass both machine beautifully and are wonderful to work with. Maybe NAWCC should hold a seminar - "Good Hygiene for the Average Clock Butcher"...
 

Schatznut

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Can't find DELRIN anywhere
That's funny - I did a google search just for grins and it returned over 7,000,000 hits. If that doesn't work for you, try "acetal" or "polyoxymethylene."
 

RJSoftware

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...
 
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RJSoftware

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Cut the tips of your nipples off and cover hammers to soften sound.
(baby bottle nipples, for Pete's sake...). I guess they is silicone.
Probably have a hard time turning a silicone nipple on the lathe, too gooey and bloody painful, to watch, that is. Might want to take them to a butcher he can slice the ends right off. But you have to pay him with Schatz clock. That's ok, just drive to any dump, plenty there.
 
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RJSoftware

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I think there might be a law agin that. Might depend on your state though. Ha

For a hammer head, regular ole (available everywhere) Nylon 6+6 would probably function the same as Derlin.

Willie X
I wanna make a passport law, mandatory banjo playin and/or moonshine jug puffin. Yeeee haaaaaw..!

But yep, errrr hmmm, nylon is tough.
 

shutterbug

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My late brother in law, a superb guitarist, used to say "I love the way an accordion sounds when it lands on a banjo in the garbage bin." I guess he was not too fond of either, even though his wife was a state champion accordion player at one time :D
 

Bruce Alexander

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Delrin can be purchased from a fair number of sellers on eBay. DelrinAF has the Teflon which isn't really needed for hammer tips, but there's no reason it can't be used for that purpose, plus it makes good bushing material as attested to by RC.

Here are a couple of photos from the last time I used Delrin for hammer tips/inserts:

P1140395.JPG

Polished Sonora Washers.JPG
 

Schatznut

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My late brother in law, a superb guitarist, used to say "I love the way an accordion sounds when it lands on a banjo in the garbage bin." I guess he was not too fond of either, even though his wife was a state champion accordion player at one time :D
Ummm... alrighty then. He's the late husband of the state champion accordion player. hum.
 

Tbucket

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I found a plastics fabricator nearby that will give me scrap Delrin almost free. However, he normally deals with rods that are 1 1/2" dia, so I have a lot of material to remove to make a small part. While it cuts super easy, it's stringy and has a tendency to birds-nest around the part. After fighting this for a while I came up with using a small shop vac to suck up the long stringy chip while it is coming off the cutting tool. Makes machining Delrin a lot more pleasant.
A good way to break up the stringy chip when turning a large amount of Delrin is to first plunge grooves in the OD. Then when turning the chip will break as your turning tool passes thru the groove.
 

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