Another suspension spriing question

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by MQ32shooter, Mar 26, 2012.

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  1. MQ32shooter

    MQ32shooter Registered User
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    Jul 7, 2008
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    I bought a Seth Thomas Umbria wall clock this weekend. The suspension spring was broken. A friend gave me one for a No. 2 ST and he said he thought it was correct for the Umbria. Problem is, the brass slot that would accept the suspension spring is too narrow for the new spring I have. Do I simply slide a screw driver up into the slot and widen it? Seems to be the correct thing to do, I just don't want to mess anything up.
     

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  2. LaBounty

    LaBounty Registered User
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    Aug 29, 2002
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    I wouldn't pry open the suspension slot but would thin the top block of the new suspension instead.

    The risk in prying with a screwdriver is that you risk breaking off one side of the suspension stud. And even if you were successful in opening up the slot, it would no longer be parallel and would introduce pendulum wobble.

    Hope that helps!
     
  3. MQ32shooter

    MQ32shooter Registered User
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    Ok, great answer. Don't tell anyone, but I already tried the "pry" it open thing. I'll see what I can do with the spring itself. David, do you the think the No. 2 spring would be correct?
     
  4. LaBounty

    LaBounty Registered User
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    Yep! A Seth Thomas no. 2 suspension spring would by my first choice as well. This style of suspension unit was used on quite a few different regulators and, if you don't have the original pieces to compare, the no. 2 is an excellent place to start. If that unit doesn't work for some reason (too short, too long, too fast, too slow...) the next option is usually to make one :).

    And it is fairly common to need to thin the suspension block somewhat as the modern replacements are a tad thick.
     
  5. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    It is seldom easy to thin the block. The thinning must be done without kinking the spring. I sometimes hold it by the lower block and gently lay it against the side of a mild abrasive wheel.
     
  6. DianneB

    DianneB Registered User

    Feb 27, 2012
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    I would be more inclined to saw or file the suspension post to fit the spring - but that's just me....
     
  7. MQ32shooter

    MQ32shooter Registered User
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    Thanks everyone for the information. That's what I'll do.
     
  8. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Filing/sawing the post creates a permanent alteration to the clock which could affect it's value. Changing the spring does not. What if the 'right' spring is found later? It won't fit. I'd avoid that kind of alteration.
     
  9. MQ32shooter

    MQ32shooter Registered User
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    Shutterbug, guess I misread the post from DianneB. I"m actually filing down the top of the spring, not messing with the post.
     
  10. Bruce Barnes

    Bruce Barnes Registered User

    Mar 20, 2004
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    Has anyone ever purchased and used the One Piece Suspension Rod & Spring from Time Savers and if so what is the thickness of the spring/feather?
    I need to replace the one I have in a J C Brown shelf clock and it appears as though this was an original rod of steel.
    Thanks,
    Bruce JCBROWN 1.jpg
     
  11. MQ32shooter

    MQ32shooter Registered User
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    Got the suspension spring filed down last night and she's up and running this morning. Thanks for all the help folks. You know, those Seth Thomas No. 40 movements are so pretty, think I might just leave the dial off!:excited:
     

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  12. Bruce Barnes

    Bruce Barnes Registered User

    Mar 20, 2004
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    I guess no one has ever used the one piece steel suspension rod and spring unit..............so i'll take a chance and make the purchase.
    Bruce
     
  13. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Bruce, they are cheap enough that if you don't like them, you are not out much. Perhaps Timesavers might tell you the thickness if you call them.
     
  14. LaBounty

    LaBounty Registered User
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    The thickness on these varies. So, if you are looking for an exact size, you will need to purchase an assortment. The few I measured start out 0.0045" - 0.007" and get thicker the closer to the rod you go.

    And Bruce, I'm afraid your post is camouflaged being embedded so deeply in another post asking about a Seth Thomas no. 2 suspension spring :). Perhaps that is why you received so few answers to your question.
     
  15. Bruce Barnes

    Bruce Barnes Registered User

    Mar 20, 2004
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    Thanks Dave and Harold,..................Dave I thought I would ride this post as it was dealing with rods and springs.
    Harold I called Timesavers,the answer is "we dont know the thickness and they are all 24 inches in length ".,hence my question.
    Thanks,
    Bruce
     

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