Another example of filmless water slide decal for dial restoration.

tracerjack

Registered User
Jun 6, 2016
2,561
548
113
Lodi, CA
Country
Region
Here is another example for those interested in filmless water slide decals for silvered dials with silk screened numbers. Again, it didn't come out perfect. One of these tries I'll get the drying time down right. There were small spots of ink that didn't adhere on the numbers. Those were filled in with ink. The lacquer top coat does a pretty good job of making everything look nice. I was even able to add the crossed arrows back. I'd much rather look at the new dial than all the scratches on the original.
HAC dialy.jpg HAC dial xa.jpg
 

bruce linde

NAWCC Member
Donor
Nov 13, 2011
10,401
2,135
113
oakland, ca.
clockhappy.com
Country
Region
I think that looks great… Where are you getting your decals, and what format is required for the artwork?
 

tracerjack

Registered User
Jun 6, 2016
2,561
548
113
Lodi, CA
Country
Region
  • Like
Reactions: Rod Schaffter

demoman3955

Registered User
Apr 9, 2022
438
123
43
65
Country
The decal paper I used for the dial is made by Sunnyscopa. It is sold online. Sunnyscopa has their own website. Amazon also sells it. You can use whatever format you like to print the image. I use InDesign. I scan the original dial and use it as a template. I guess I should have simply added this to my original thread, https://mb.nawcc.org/threads/filmless-water-slide-decal-paper-for-silvered-dials.186927/
what kind of ink and printer do you use? The reason im asking is because doing my Tee shirt negatives, i have my printer set to all black, and no colors, because normal printers will add a bit of color to print an image. I cant print a normal photo at all, because the printer tells it to act like there are different colors in the machine. I tried to print a sign that only had black text, but the background had black, because a background still has color. I run a color separating software that will make a picture show every color as a different page, and thats how the image is done on shirts. too bad my 600 dollar printer is now limited unless i add color Cartridges back in.
 

tracerjack

Registered User
Jun 6, 2016
2,561
548
113
Lodi, CA
Country
Region
I use a Xerox 7750 laser printer which is an older model. I’ve been waiting for it to die because it is so large and takes up so much space. So far, it refuses to, but in its defense is the best printer I have ever owned. Crisp, clear lines for everything. Uses toner ink which matches the Type A filmless paper. I also have filmless paper for inkjet printers which I haven’t tried yet.
 

demoman3955

Registered User
Apr 9, 2022
438
123
43
65
Country
I use a Xerox 7750 laser printer which is an older model. I’ve been waiting for it to die because it is so large and takes up so much space. So far, it refuses to, but in its defense is the best printer I have ever owned. Crisp, clear lines for everything. Uses toner ink which matches the Type A filmless paper. I also have filmless paper for inkjet printers which I haven’t tried yet.
I use an Epson with refillable cartridges and it can print 17x24 sheets or 17 wide rolls.
 

Rod Schaffter

Registered User
Mar 20, 2020
246
50
28
60
Country
The decal paper I used for the dial is made by Sunnyscopa. It is sold online. Sunnyscopa has their own website. Amazon also sells it. You can use whatever format you like to print the image. I use InDesign. I scan the original dial and use it as a template. I guess I should have simply added this to my original thread, https://mb.nawcc.org/threads/filmless-water-slide-decal-paper-for-silvered-dials.186927/
Thank you for this info! :cool: I ordered this film for the laser printer to make decals to create a new dial when I restored the "11 o'Clock Toast" clock for our Elks Lodge. I applied them to glass and sprayed it with Rustoleum frosted glass spray...

Take Care, Rod

Elks Dial.jpg
 

PatH

NAWCC Fellow
NAWCC Member
Dec 5, 2014
2,879
2,446
113
Texas
Country
Region
Interesting - did you apply it to the glass in the bezel, or a separate piece of drilled glass that attaches as a dial? Based on your use, it seems that application to a piece of glass with a drilled hole for the arbor could be used to replace broken reverse painted glass dials. This could be a good alternative for those who might not be comfortable painting a new dial. Do you have a picture of the clock with the glass installed? Thanks for sharing your findings with the transfer.
 

Rod Schaffter

Registered User
Mar 20, 2020
246
50
28
60
Country
Interesting - did you apply it to the glass in the bezel, or a separate piece of drilled glass that attaches as a dial? Based on your use, it seems that application to a piece of glass with a drilled hole for the arbor could be used to replace broken reverse painted glass dials. This could be a good alternative for those who might not be comfortable painting a new dial. Do you have a picture of the clock with the glass installed? Thanks for sharing your findings with the transfer.
They were applied to the glass in the the bezel prior to soldering it into the bezel.

There is no mechanism; the hands of this ceremonial "Clock" are fixed. It was originally made from the case of an actual clock, probably in the 1910-30 range. The screw holes and imprint of the movement remain on the inside. Originally the hands were painted on the painted face. I epoxied actual clock hands to the back of the glass which show up nicely when illuminated.

I debated weather to put the numbers on the inside or the outside of the glass, but opted for the outside as I was concerned about damaging them or the frosted spray when resoldering the bezel clips.

As an aside, the significance of the 11 o'Clock Toast is explained here...

Take Care,
Rod

Lodge Clock.jpg
P.S. I replaced the ancient cloth-insulated wiring with a modern cord. ;)
 
  • Like
Reactions: PatH

PatH

NAWCC Fellow
NAWCC Member
Dec 5, 2014
2,879
2,446
113
Texas
Country
Region
They were applied to the glass in the the bezel prior to soldering it into the bezel.

There is no mechanism; the hands of this ceremonial "Clock" are fixed. It was originally made from the case of an actual clock, probably in the 1910-30 range. The screw holes and imprint of the movement remain on the inside. Originally the hands were painted on the painted face. I epoxied actual clock hands to the back of the glass which show up nicely when illuminated.

I debated weather to put the numbers on the inside or the outside of the glass, but opted for the outside as I was concerned about damaging them or the frosted spray when resoldering the bezel clips.

As an aside, the significance of the 11 o'Clock Toast is explained here...

Take Care,
Rod

View attachment 720171
P.S. I replaced the ancient cloth-insulated wiring with a modern cord. ;)
Thanks for the explanation of how you created the dial, as well as the symbolism of 11:00. I have a couple of BPOE fobs and have noticed that there was a clock on many BPOE items. Upon closer examination, I saw that the hands of the clock are set to 11, and now I know why. Yet another interesting tidbit I've learned collecting horological items. Thank you!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Rod Schaffter

Forum statistics

Threads
176,448
Messages
1,544,441
Members
53,309
Latest member
drohlin17
Encyclopedia Pages
1,064
Total wiki contributions
3,031
Last update
-