An Old Family Clock

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by fbicknel, Jul 21, 2019.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

    Apr 14, 2017
    128
    11
    18
    Male
    Cumming, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    #1 fbicknel, Jul 21, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2019
    Greetings,

    Moving on to the next clock, I was wondering if this might be my next vict--er--choice.

    Can anyone help me identify this Seth Thomas and its movement? Is this Adamantine that I've read about here? (nevermind. see below. :) )

    Not sure whether the bits in the front where the finish is missing are reparable.

    This clock has been in my family since most likely the 1930s or 40s. It belonged to my maternal grandparents and used to tick in their house back in the day. It no longer runs and it would seem that one of us (um... Dad, me. Not blaming any of you ;) ) one of us may have lost the suspension for the pendulum. EDIT: Pendulum bob and key are present. Pendulum rod and suspension spring are apparently still at large.

    Ha... So I dragged this off the shelf to look for the pendulum suspension (still at large, alas)... and I looked on the bottom -- thereby answering one question and possibly the second:
    2019-07-21 1717 Screenshot.png

    Some interesting artifacts:
    20190721_172043.jpg 20190721_172027.jpg

    And here are some more general pictures:

    20180417_104549.jpg

    20180417_104350.jpg 20180417_104400.jpg 20180417_104403.jpg 20180417_104408.jpg 20180417_104437.jpg 20180417_104530.jpg 20180417_110936.jpg 20180417_110944.jpg 20180417_110947.jpg 20180417_110952.jpg 20180417_111023.jpg
     
  2. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
    11,697
    596
    113
    #2 Willie X, Jul 21, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2019
    It's pre 1902. Many cases have the date stamped or stenciled on the case bottom. I'm
    working on a 1889 one now. Willie X
     
  3. gleber

    gleber Registered User

    Jun 15, 2015
    1,449
    141
    63
    Male
    Underwater Robotics Expert
    Downingtown, Pennsylvania USA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Your second photo shows 4981I .. translation, 1894. The months were identified by letter A= Jan, L= Dec. It looks like an "I," so, Sep 1894.

    Yes that is Adamantine, introduced in 1882.

    Tom
     
    fbicknel likes this.
  4. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

    Apr 14, 2017
    128
    11
    18
    Male
    Cumming, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Thanks! Anyone have an idea what movement this is? Or maybe it will become apparent when I take it out (i.e., stamped on the front.)

    Also, anyone have a picture of what the pendulum rod and suspension spring looks like? I may wind up having to fabricate one.
     
  5. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
    11,697
    596
    113
    #44, yes you will have to make the pendulum rod, it's around 3 5/8 long. Make it longer and shorten as necessary to keep time with the adjuster at its mid point. Willie X
     
    fbicknel likes this.
  6. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

    Apr 14, 2017
    128
    11
    18
    Male
    Cumming, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Interesting how they thought they had to encode dates of manufacture then. I wonder how the board room meeting went... I know... We'll Reverse the numbers. They'll never figure it out!
     
  7. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

    Apr 14, 2017
    128
    11
    18
    Male
    Cumming, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Oh! Here's a link I found on this board that still functions about adamantine and the history of clocks. History of Seth Thomas Adamantine Antique Mantel Clocks

    Regarding the adamantine: I wonder if you could fashion a replacement piece from the celluloid sheets you find on Amazon that people apparently use for guitar heads? (I searched up celluloid sheet and got a bunch of hits.) It's too thick (1.5mm) but I guess one could sand down a small piece, heat it to form it, and hide glue it in place. Seems pretty finicky, but might work?
     
  8. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
    11,697
    596
    113
    It was important for the manufacturer and retailer to know how old the clock was for warranty and other reasons but they didnt necessarily want the consumer to know. Many products are still like that today.

    For televisions there a was a consumer protection law passed back around 1980 to force all manufacturers to lable all there products with the actual date of manufacturer. But today the lable may be there or maybe not. Many manufacturers still use a letter code in the model # or serial #, or it's a very long number string with the date code hiding in there somewhere. It's about the same game today as it was 140 years ago!

    Willie X
     
  9. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
    Sponsor NAWCC Brass Member

    Feb 22, 2010
    5,819
    316
    83
    Male
    Retired, not tired
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Your clock closely resembles the Seth Thomas "Marken". Your clock was a little earlier than the Marken (circa 1904) which looks to have used the No. 89 movement. What are your clock's case measurements? That Date Code is in really good condition. Often you can barely make out part of the stamp.
    You should look at this document from Dave LaBounty's website. It discusses a feature of this movement that you'll want to take note of before you take the movement apart. https://www.abouttime-clockmaking.com/downloads/What%20is%20it.pdf

    Good luck and have fun!

    Regards,

    Bruce
     
    fbicknel likes this.
  10. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

    Apr 14, 2017
    128
    11
    18
    Male
    Cumming, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    The base measures 15-3/4 x 6-1/4 (LxD) and the clock stands 11-1/2 H. Feet excluded on the LxD measurements, included in the height. The dial is abt. 5-1/4 dia.

    400mm x 159mm x 292mm. Dial 133mm.

    Oh and thanks for the warning about the "What Is It?" j-hook whatzit. I can imagine myself fiddling with that for an hour.
     
  11. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
    Sponsor NAWCC Brass Member

    Feb 22, 2010
    5,819
    316
    83
    Male
    Retired, not tired
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    #11 Bruce Alexander, Jul 22, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2019
    The "Marken" measures 15 3/4" base and 11 1/2" in height. I have no measurement for depth but it certainly looks like it may be a later version of your clock. I found the Marken on page 479 of Tran Duy Ly's book on Seth Thomas Clocks & Movements. As mentioned, it's not an exact match, but pretty close.

    Happy to help with the Set-Back Enigma. It has caused a lot of us to scratch our heads when we first came across it. The No. 44 "Hip" Movement is a nice, robust movement to work on.
    Let us know if you have any questions as you go through it.

    Regards,

    Bruce

    P1030913.JPG
     
  12. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

    Apr 14, 2017
    128
    11
    18
    Male
    Cumming, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Alright: all I gotta do is scrape together $9.34 and I can buy one of these. :D
     
  13. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
    Sponsor NAWCC Brass Member

    Feb 22, 2010
    5,819
    316
    83
    Male
    Retired, not tired
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    You lost me. One of what? :???:
     
  14. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Sep 4, 2008
    3,628
    335
    83
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    The clock. That's the catalog price.

    Uhralt
     
    Dave T likes this.
  15. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

    Apr 14, 2017
    128
    11
    18
    Male
    Cumming, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Sorry, guys. Obtuse humor.

    So I looked through my inventory of ST clocks and found two with original pendulum rods. One is a Tambour clock (so longer pendulum), it measures .065.

    Another is a type 89, but it has been rather poorly repaired, so may not be original. It measures .073.

    A third is from a type 11 weight-driven movement and is in good shape, but also longer. It is .060.

    The last one is interesting, as the rod is apparently one piece with the suspension spring: the top bit of the rod was heated and flattened, so it is the suspension spring. Alas, it is also broken, but that's another clock.

    Anyway... I have some wire that's .073 laying around. I'm thinking that's my best bet. I also have .047, .103, .120, and .148. :)

    Let me know if you agree with me that .073 is the right candidate.

    Also, should I try to make the top of that rod the suspension spring as in the type 11 movement? I have some broken mainspring material I was going to make it of using rivets and a piece of brass at the top. Any suggestions on the suspension spring.

    Oh, and pictures (it's out of the case, now.) I tried to limit the number of pictures to avoid boring everyone to tears.

    It's gonna need a few bushings and obviously a good cleaning, but it otherwise looks pretty good. When the anchor fell off its perch it started spinning free, so at least I know all the wheels move as designed, if not quite with original precision.

    I got a few good shots of the j-hook and surrounding mechanism at work near the end here.

    20190723_115522.jpg 20190723_120050.jpg 20190723_120150.jpg 20190723_120203.jpg 20190723_120227.jpg 20190723_120635.jpg 20190723_120658.jpg 20190723_120714.jpg 20190723_120735.jpg 20190723_120756.jpg 20190723_120830.jpg 20190723_120845.jpg 20190723_120931.jpg
     
  16. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
    Sponsor NAWCC Brass Member

    Feb 22, 2010
    5,819
    316
    83
    Male
    Retired, not tired
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    #16 Bruce Alexander, Jul 23, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2019
    Doh! o_O

    Thanks Uhrait.

    I was thinking in terms of today's money. $10 doesn't get you very far.

    According to my trusty online inflation calculator:

    "What cost $9.34 in 1904 would cost $268.79 in 2019".

    ...for what's it's worth...
     
    fbicknel likes this.
  17. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Sep 4, 2008
    3,628
    335
    83
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    The right candidate would be the rod that fits nicely inside the crutch. There should be very little side shake but the rod should also not be binding. Just try which one of your choices fits best.

    Uhralt
     
    fbicknel likes this.
  18. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
    11,697
    596
    113
    Just use a new rod/spring. Just like bad keys, replace old with new. Some companies do have better parts than others but you never know for sure until you get them in hand. Willie X
     
  19. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

    Apr 14, 2017
    128
    11
    18
    Male
    Cumming, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Pieces!

    So I took a few of that whole J-hook business. I gotta say, if I weren't forewarned, I might have glossed over it and it's not exactly simple. The position of that brass follower doo-dad with the flirt on it was not intuitive and I somehow missed that in all the pre-disassembly pictures I took except for one little hint:

    2019-07-23 1614 Screenshot.png

    After it was apart, I took this sequence after figuring out how it was before "Pieces!"

    20190723_154257.jpg 20190723_154418.jpg 20190723_154435.jpg 20190723_154605.jpg
    Glam shots:

    Time side
    20190723_152837.jpg

    Strike side

    20190723_152849.jpg
     
  20. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

    Apr 14, 2017
    128
    11
    18
    Male
    Cumming, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    You mean:

    2019-07-23 1621 Screenshot.png
    ?

    If .004 is the target thickness, then I'd be way off with my old mainspring piece: it's .0085.

    Thanks, Willie.
     
  21. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
    Sponsor NAWCC Brass Member

    Feb 22, 2010
    5,819
    316
    83
    Male
    Retired, not tired
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Glad to see you around and doing your thing Willie.
     
  22. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
    11,697
    596
    113
    fbic,
    Spring and rod are permanetely joined, like Merritts P-111, this is the usual size. They're cheap so buy some 'long' ones and some 'long spring' ones when you see them for sale. Willie X
     
  23. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
    Sponsor NAWCC Brass Member

    Feb 22, 2010
    5,819
    316
    83
    Male
    Retired, not tired
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    fbic,
    You can also order from suppliers on eBay.

    Usually a higher price per part but no minimums with low or free shipping to help offset.
    But as you probably know, it's best to order multiple items to get beyond traditional suppliers' small order charges and reduce shipping but keep eBay in mind as an option if you need a small, quick order.

    This list is somewhat dated but there are plenty of good links on it still: Clock Suppliers -- General/Supply/Tools/Repair/Service/Etc. •
     
  24. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
    11,697
    596
    113
    You can order from whoever you want of course. But I would make up a minimum+ order and send it to one of the very few remaining companies dedicated to supplying clock parts to the clock repair trade.

    Willie X
     
    gleber likes this.
  25. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
    Sponsor NAWCC Brass Member

    Feb 22, 2010
    5,819
    316
    83
    Male
    Retired, not tired
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    #25 Bruce Alexander, Jul 24, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2019
    Some of said companies even sell directly (or indirectly) on eBay.

    Sometimes I need something small and fast. eBay has been useful in those situations.

    Normally, I do try to order from Merritts, especially since they are located in my home State but they don't have as extensive a catalog as a company like Timesavers, for example.

    eBay is just an option to keep in mind like the rest of the businesses on the link I provided to you. Might I suggest that you bookmark it. It can save you some time in the future.

    Regards,

    Bruce
     
  26. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Sep 4, 2008
    3,628
    335
    83
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    To me it often appears that items showing up on ebay are identical to the ones sold by Timesavers, but offered for a higher price.

    Uhralt
     
  27. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
    Sponsor NAWCC Brass Member

    Feb 22, 2010
    5,819
    316
    83
    Male
    Retired, not tired
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    As usual, I think you're right Uhrait. Although, last year I did pick up a nice assortment of Jewel Pallets at a great price from Ronell on eBay. There are probably others, but I'm not sure. Certainly there are "middle" Sellers. They must get their stock from somewhere. My guess is that they buy in bulk from suppliers who give a bulk price break and then sell in small lots. eBay and PayPal aren't free services so there has to be a mark up and no one works for free unless they restore antique clocks for the marketplace. :chuckling:

    You have to weigh the bottom line of course. If you need, or just want, something in a hurry because you're working on a disassembled clock, it's an option is all I'm saying.

    I realize that I'm just a retired hobbyist who should be seen (maybe) and not heard (definitely), but I try to help where and when I can. :whistle:
     
  28. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

    Apr 14, 2017
    128
    11
    18
    Male
    Cumming, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Boing!

    20190725_114015.jpg 20190725_114045.jpg 20190725_120920.jpg 20190725_120936.jpg

    This was one of my failed attempts at making a feather spring for the suspension. I had to try. :)

    Clearly spring metallurgy is not the same as normal steel: I tried quenching in oil and water both. Both resulted in a brittle mess. I was able to drill it (as you can see) if I didn't quench it after heating. But making it back into a "spring" failed on all counts.

    Again. I had to try. Will buy some as suggested above once I get closer to that goal.

    20190724_125653.jpg
     
  29. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
    NAWCC Member Sponsor

    Jun 14, 2008
    2,493
    387
    83
    Male
    Magnolia, TX
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    suspension springs for these clocks are not hardened or tempered. They are generally no more than flattened out mild steel, as they have been made for many years by most makers. True spings (suspension) are usually only found in larger and more refined clock movements.
     
  30. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
    11,697
    596
    113
    What Jim said.

    I make them from .003" regular steel shim stock. You do have to be a bit more carefully as the soft steel will bend easily. But, on the plus side they can be straightened out many times and rarely break. I've seen some that are only about 1/8" wide and have survived over 150 years. Willie X
     
  31. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
    NAWCC Member Sponsor

    Jun 14, 2008
    2,493
    387
    83
    Male
    Magnolia, TX
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    I have both those with springs attached as well as those (one piece) with rolled ends of the same material. I prefer the old-style single piece suspension rods/springs

    20190725_130820.jpg
     
  32. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

    Apr 14, 2017
    128
    11
    18
    Male
    Cumming, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    After much hammering, sanding and a little work with the diamond stone...
    20190725_154638.jpg

    I think this might be good enough to actually use.

    BTW, those last thousanths (past about .010 or so) are a bear.

    No amount of anvil work would budge it past about .010. Then some 80-grit paper took it down to .007, but didn't seem to want to go further. Finally the 300 diamond stone got me in the .004 neighborhood and 600 to finish it.

    *whew* I'm definitely buying these next time. But I can point to this clock and say I made part of it, this time. :)

    (you can see the pin vice attached to the bottom, btw.)
     
  33. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
    11,697
    596
    113
    fbic,

    Big problem when you try to work something down by hand is that the spring will not have a uniform thickness across the piece ... Easy enough to buy the stock of the right thickness and cut it to size, watch springs, shim stock, etc.

    You are persistent. That's a very good trait to have for clock repairing. :)

    Willie X
     
    fbicknel likes this.
  34. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

    Apr 14, 2017
    128
    11
    18
    Male
    Cumming, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Update: the clock is back together and my homemade leader and suspension are doing ok, I think.

    There's a bit of wobble at the crutch pivot... do we rebush those?
    2019-08-13 1130 Screenshot.png This bit right here wobbles a bit.

    I have a video, but YouTube is being obnoxious and it's taking forever to "process". I'll post the link once it finishes, as that shows it much better than the still does.

    My leader is rigged to let me adjust using a hook fashioned from a wire bail that came on a container of fried rice last time we ordered Chinese food. :)
    2019-08-13 1135 Screenshot.png
    Once I figure out the right length for my leader, I'll bend the leader into a hook and the last remnant of that meal will become history. Right now it's running pretty fast (gained about 15 min over the past 14 hours), so I have some adjustin' to do.

    First I think I'll let down the time mainspring and see if it still ticks at "low power".

    Anyway... it's coming along. :)
     
  35. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

    Apr 14, 2017
    128
    11
    18
    Male
    Cumming, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    So here it is completely let down:
    20190813_115314.jpg

    And here it is with 4 turns on the arbor -- and it runs!
    20190813_115622.jpg

    I'm happy about that.
     
  36. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

    Apr 14, 2017
    128
    11
    18
    Male
    Cumming, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Oh and the case is cleaned up and ready to go:
    20190813_103438.jpg 20190813_103452.jpg
     
  37. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
    Sponsor NAWCC Brass Member

    Feb 22, 2010
    5,819
    316
    83
    Male
    Retired, not tired
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    If there is room, one "trick" that might work is to slightly bend or adjust the saddle tabs away from one another. That makes them a little out of line and reduces the amount of slop present.

    Some folks will use hole closing punches.

    Generally speaking, the brass tabs are not thick enough to retain a bush through a friction fit alone and you have to remove a lot of brass while trying to stay on center. It can be done though

    Another method is to run an appropriately sized brass tube, or bushing wire, between the tabs. I've done that and used a small amount of solder to keep the tube in place. The disadvantage to that approach is that if the pallets ever need to be heat treated, the solder will melt off and the tube will have to be re-set when all of the other work is done.

    A different approach is to replace the pin with one of a larger diameter. I've not tried it.

    Your work is looking good! :thumb:

    Bruce
     
    fbicknel likes this.
  38. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

    Apr 14, 2017
    128
    11
    18
    Male
    Cumming, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    I've decided that for now, at least, I'm not going to worry about the wobble. It's noticible, but not excessive. Um, and it is running.

    So on the stand in front of its case:
    2019-08-13 1407 Screenshot.png

    The arrow points to the problem child, photobombing.
     
  39. Arthur Cagle

    Arthur Cagle Registered User

    May 22, 2003
    407
    5
    18
    Male
    Retired
    Greater Baton Rouge Area, Louisiana
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    I am no expert but find it interesting that the figured adamantine doesn't cover the entire case. The Marken referred to earlier is not like that, nor have I ever seen one mixed like that, even in Tran's book, not that this proves anything. I just wonder if the case is entirely original or pieced together.
     
    Kevin W. likes this.
  40. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

    Apr 14, 2017
    128
    11
    18
    Male
    Cumming, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    From what I can tell by eyeballing it, everything on this clock appears to be original. I know for a fact that the clock has been in the family since it was bought (possibly used; possibly in 1904), and that it has never seen a repair until 1) my dad took a look at the messed up pendulum suspension & leader, but didn't clean or disassemble the clock and 2) me. I don't see any obvious glued repairs or other signs of piecemeal repairs. I also know it spent a lot of time in a closet. :)

    I took a bunch more pictures for your perusal. I know it may be difficult for either of us to say for sure.

    I thought this odd: the color of the adamantine on the base differs from that of the upper tier. Fading perhaps differed for that material? Was it replaced a long time ago? (That seems unlikely unless it was a "warranty" job. :) )

    It is adorned by two cigarette "brands" on ledges on the side. For some reason, that must have been a favorite place for everyone to rest their cigarette whilst they messed with something much more important -- only to have the thing burn the edge of the ledge. It was so commonplace, that both bottom ledges have these burn marks (fortunately at the back edge). Maybe someone saw what they did and put it on the other side so they would match? :) I have also seen these occasionally on other clocks I have laying around here.

    Someone also allowed a small bottle of solvent (nail polish remover, maybe?) to rest on top of the clock, forever branding it with the oval pattern of the bottom of the bottle. Fortunately, that's not too noticeable if you don't look for it.

    That and the bit of adamantine that flaked off the front skirt appear to be the only issues.

    Hey. Not bad for being around for 125 years, I suppose? :)

    20190815_105049.jpg 20190815_105054.jpg 20190815_105101.jpg 20190815_105115.jpg 20190815_105124.jpg 20190815_105137.jpg 20190815_105142.jpg 20190815_105151.jpg 20190815_105309.jpg 20190815_105319.jpg 20190815_105320.jpg 20190815_105332.jpg 20190815_105347.jpg 20190815_105403.jpg 2019-08-15 1059 Screenshot.png
     
  41. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

    Apr 14, 2017
    128
    11
    18
    Male
    Cumming, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    So this was an interesting problem:

    2019-08-15 1038 Screenshot.png
    Every time I would adjust the clock, this separation would appear and the leader didn't drop as it was supposed to do. Presumably because the bottom fork had a bit more grip on the suspension than the upper one.

    So I decided to punch a small detent in the suspension so the upper fork would have something to push against:
    2019-08-15 1038 Screenshot_1.png

    That worked ok, but it caused a new problem. Every time things were moving down (slower), it would push the pendulum away from the back of the clock causing it to bind in the crutch:
    2019-08-15 1041 Screenshot.png

    The upper arrow shows where the upper fork would unevenly push on the suspension causing a torque (middle curved arrow) around the lower fork and pushing the pendulum rod into the crutch -- um, fork?

    Anyway, bound up like that, the clock soon stopped and pushing the pendulum back into alignment would allow it to run again. I even polished the sides of the pendulum rod at the friction point and while that did help a little, it wasn't enough.

    So, I wound up putting another couple of punches in the spring so the fork had two of these to push against:
    2019-08-15 1043 Screenshot.png
    That seems to work much better: I can crank the pendulum to its upper and lower limits now and it doesn't bind the crutch.

    Also. My homemade pendulum suspension/leader/rod seems to be working well. It could all go up in (figurative) flames when it comes time to make that final bend at the hook for the bob, but if that operation goes well and it keeps on ticking and tocking, I'm gonna call that a "personal touch." :)

    Back to trying to regulate this thing.
     
  42. Arthur Cagle

    Arthur Cagle Registered User

    May 22, 2003
    407
    5
    18
    Male
    Retired
    Greater Baton Rouge Area, Louisiana
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Regarding the case, I can't see any obvious signs it isn't all original, but you'd be in a better position to see that first hand. You can see an almost infinite variety among these black mantels; some models were made exclusively for mass buyers, many variations turn up that aren't in any reference materials, and I suspect quite a few were put together from odds and ends at the end of model runs. The sheer variety in itself is interesting. I happen to have a weakness for these gaudy beasts. Enjoy your clock; it's always a big plus to have it handed down in the family, and the dings and dents are all part of its history.
     
    fbicknel likes this.
  43. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

    Apr 14, 2017
    128
    11
    18
    Male
    Cumming, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Time for an update on the movement.

    (Previously on An Old Family Clock)

    I had this set up for the home-built pendulum suspension & rod:
    2019-08-18 1138 Screenshot.png
    The clock has now spent quite a few days on this stand with me occasionally moving this whole bob hook contraption up and down until I got some decent timekeeping.

    I needed the stand, so it moved here -- note the excess pendulum rod in front of the bob:
    2019-08-18 1150 Screenshot.png

    After a few more days of fiddling with the pendulum bob, I got a 24-hour period where it looked like it might have gained only a couple of minutes.

    Time to take decisive action!

    20190818_112338.jpg

    And back on the wall to see how that turns out:
    2019-08-18 1155 Screenshot.png

    The act of bending it "approximately" where it was before is such a shot in the dark. my mark turned out about a mm above the below of the hook; but I was going for long, as it was gaining just a bit and I hoped that removing the mass of the excess rod at the bottom would warrant just a tiny bit of extra length.

    Oh who am I kidding. I got lucky.

    Anyway, in a few days' time, I'll know how lucky I really am.

    In the meantime, new spring/rod assemblies are on the way from TS. Covering the bases in case I completely missed somehow.
     
  44. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

    Apr 14, 2017
    128
    11
    18
    Male
    Cumming, GA
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Update:

    This one is a success!

    2019-08-21 1025 Screenshot.png 2019-08-21 1026 Screenshot.png
     
    Time After Time and 124Spider like this.

Share This Page