An early and interesting wood tall case movement.

Discussion in 'Wood Movement Clocks' started by Peter A. Nunes, Oct 14, 2011.

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  1. Peter A. Nunes

    Peter A. Nunes Moderator
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    Mar 3, 2006
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    An interesting fragment of a wood tall case movement that recently came to me- it is early and interesting. I think it is an 8-day movement, an oddity in itself in the era in which it was made. It is a large movement, with the plates measuring 11.5" H x 9.5" W, and 3" between the plates. Although it features an apparently original seatboard, it retains vestigial lower movement posts, no doubt left over from an earlier design. The back plate is dovetailed into the seatboard. It features rack and snail strike, with a double leaved gathering pallet. All that is left of the strike mechanism on the front plate is the gathering pallet and the snail on the hour wheel (thin brass riveted over a wood snail), along with iron pins that would have held the rack and other parts. An interesting feature that I haven't seen before is the row of three gears across the front plate to power the minute wheel- the middle gear is just an idler, although it functions an the intermediate wheel, as it has a pinion that drives the hour wheel. The minute and hour arbors and wheels are mounted on the front plate, held in place with the wrought iron three footed plate seen in the pictures. This is reminiscent of the way the same parts are mounted on Ashby movements. The seatboard is white pine, the plates look like birch to me, but I'm not sure (they have a distinctly reddish color). The second wheel, time side, has 60 teeth, an unusually large number, and another feature that makes me think this may be an 8 day movement. It retains a nicely made wrought iron bell stand that is simply hooked into a hole in the plate, then held in place with a rivet a bit higher up, since ripped out (this movement has had a hard life!). So, another interesting survivor, which probably dates to the last quarter of the 18th century, and probably hails from northern Massachusetts or a state even further north.
     

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  2. David 62

    David 62 Registered User
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    Nov 28, 2004
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    Interesting artifact.It goes to show that there were clock makers that made wooden clocks in very small numbers.It's too bad the dial and case did not survive or got separated from the movement.
    Dave
     
  3. Peter A. Nunes

    Peter A. Nunes Moderator
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    Mar 3, 2006
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    Restorer of antique clocks.
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    I've had an interest in these odd, early movements for years, and when I find one by an unknown maker like this one, I write it up for the Cog Counter's Journal. This helps flesh out the story of these early makers. Occasionally this leads to other similar examples bubbling to the surface.
     

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