Alarming issue!!!

RJSoftware

Registered User
Apr 15, 2005
8,480
122
63
Loxahatchee, Florida
Country
Region
Hey yall.

I have a few old alarm clocks. Each time I go to work on one of them I forget that it has these fixed knobs to turn the time with.

For one in particular (1958 Snoopy clock made in Hong Kong). Has aluminum plates, some brass gears and these pressed on knobs.

This one has a pressed on knob on the minute hand arbor and is to advance the time.

I can't take movement completely apart unless I could remove this knob. It does not appear to be screwed on as is designed to turn in either direction.

It seems to be a pressed on fit. I have noticed this on some of my Gilbert alarm clocks as well.

HoW Do I RemoVe them?

Thanks
RJ

(p.s. sorry no pics. Digital is down).
 

RJSoftware

Registered User
Apr 15, 2005
8,480
122
63
Loxahatchee, Florida
Country
Region
Hey yall.

I have a few old alarm clocks. Each time I go to work on one of them I forget that it has these fixed knobs to turn the time with.

For one in particular (1958 Snoopy clock made in Hong Kong). Has aluminum plates, some brass gears and these pressed on knobs.

This one has a pressed on knob on the minute hand arbor and is to advance the time.

I can't take movement completely apart unless I could remove this knob. It does not appear to be screwed on as is designed to turn in either direction.

It seems to be a pressed on fit. I have noticed this on some of my Gilbert alarm clocks as well.

HoW Do I RemoVe them?

Thanks
RJ

(p.s. sorry no pics. Digital is down).
 

Sooth

NAWCC Member
Feb 19, 2005
3,936
67
48
37
Cornwall, Ontario, Canada
www.angelfire.com
Country
Region
I have a "Parker" alarm clock made in Czechoslovakia which had an EXTREMELY tightly fit knob that sounds the same as what you're describing.

Mine has a split (a cut) in the base, and just fits over a square arbor. It's simply pressure fit, and I was able to eventually pry it off.

I'm not sure if that's the same as what you have, so wait for a few others to comment.
 

Scottie-TX

Deceased
Apr 6, 2004
936
61
0
80
Mesquite, TX
Country
Region
I believe also that the knob is friction fit to probably a tapered square arbor. Do you have one of these 'round the house? I believe it's called a tack puller.
92.gif
This tool can create a tremendous force in a small arc. I'd put a pair of pliers directly below this tool and prise upward on the knob against the plier face.
 

RJSoftware

Registered User
Apr 15, 2005
8,480
122
63
Loxahatchee, Florida
Country
Region
Hey Sooth; Sounds correct as mine has a partial split too.
Scottie; Good ideal. Nail puller.

I was more curious to find out exactly how it was done, cause I did try prying at, seems like it's going to tear it up.

Wondering also if I should apply heat.

RJ
 

shutterbug

Moderator
Staff member
NAWCC Member
Oct 19, 2005
46,431
1,862
113
North Carolina
Country
Region
Just "muscle" it, RJ :)
 

Scottie-TX

Deceased
Apr 6, 2004
936
61
0
80
Mesquite, TX
Country
Region
No HEAT! The MAVERICKS will take care of the "HEAT" next week.
Actually ARJAY, Shock works best. If you can contrive a way to hold the kanob with a plier and induce shock in the proper direction ( without mangling sumthin' else ) - SHOCK is the best method.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
165,505
Messages
1,440,750
Members
86,274
Latest member
cicastol
Encyclopedia Pages
1,101
Total wiki contributions
2,873
Last edit
Weekly News 7/7/19 by Tom McIntyre