Ain't she pretty?

Discussion in 'Wood Movement Clocks' started by rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Apr 28, 2018.

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  1. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    #1 rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Apr 28, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2018
    I'm always a sucker for a pretty tablet.

    Tonight, I'm posting a 30 hour T&S WW weight driven clock by the firm of Langdon and Jones with a pretty tablet.

    This would not be the first appearance of this somewhat less frequently encountered maker on the MB. See this thread from some years ago:

    Langdon and Jones

    I will refer to this as the "L&J thread".

    Mary Jane Dapkus wrote an interesting article about this firm:

    http://docs.nawcc.org/Bulletins/2000/articles/2009/379/379_211.pdf

    With all due respect, it is an impenetrable recounting of a litany of documents, etc. What I distilled from the exhaustive research presented there is that is that they were in business for a relatively brief period of time, from about 1831-1835. They produced their own movements which they did supply to others.

    The subject clock is a "pillar and splat" clock:

    langdon&jones 1.JPG

    It was acquired at a local auction in NH.

    The first clock on the L&J thread, really a case fragment sans columns, splat, dial and movement, appears to be an earlier form of WW case with the columns applied to the door and wide "chimneys" for the spat. I do disagree with the statement made that that the case had "triangular" columns. If one looks closely at enlargements of the pix provided, I feel one can clearly see the outline of turned 1/2 columns and splat.

    The stenciling on the subject clock is rather nice and well preserved. Here's the splat:

    langdon&jones 2.JPG

    For reasons beyond my comprehension, I could not get decent pix of the 1/2 columns. For a sense of how they look, see the close up of the tablet below.

    Yes, the tablet. Here it is:

    langdon&jones 4.JPG

    IMCO, an exceptional compendium of the decorating techniques used for CT tablets at the time. Free hand (the drapes), super stenciling and lithography. Most often, the drapery is simple and red. Here, there is much detail and note how the border of the drapes matches the color of the dress.

    Here's the back of the tablet:

    langdon and jones 9.JPG

    It appears that the lithographed portion is the trimmed portrait of the woman which was hand colored from behind.

    An interesting tidbit I will mention in the context of the tablet discussion. According to Dapkus' article, Jones married a one Eunice Pond. See this thread:

    Did tablet decorators ever sign their work?

    It's about Harriet Pond. She painted tablets and was kind enough to sign her work! She married one of the Terrys. A sister or other relation who also married a clock maker?

    Paul Henion has done some wonderful work exploring these tablets. See the following MB thread:

    Research Request - Lithograph Images on Clock Tablets

    Also see his wonderful Bulletin article about these tablets:

    http://docs.nawcc.org/Bulletins/2010/articles/2012/397/397_234_249.pdf

    Often, Kellogg lithographs were used for these tablets. I couldn't find this particular image, but I do suspect that it is by that firm. Again, see Paul's Bulletin article.

    Great stenciling on the tablet. Of note, lithographs like this were found amongst Fenn's papers. Did he provide the stenciling?

    I love the colorful dial. Wonderful Arabic numerals with wonderful spandrel decoration.

    langdon&jones 5.JPG

    On the L&J thread, the second and third clocks posted have rather similar dials. However, note, that those clocks have an earlier form of WW dial with the time track internal to the Arabic numerals which have wonderful flourishes. My dial has an external time track. I have no doubt as to it's originality. I really like the use of blue for the spandrels on my dial.

    Here's the label:

    langdon&jones 6.JPG

    Here's the printer's credit:

    langdon&jones 7.JPG

    The label shows evidence of silver fish attack confirmed by the numerous empty exoskeletons vacuumed from the bottom and an oil slick.

    Here's the movement:

    langdon&jones8.JPG

    This is the 8.211 (?: I usually screw this up) movement which they produced for their own use and supplied to other makers. The 3rd clock in L&J thread shows a very different movement which makes me question its originality. I will say the case form of that clock is quite interesting. Take a look.

    We must have superfluidity.

    As those few who have followed my threads know, I "heart" George Hunzinger furniture. I recent came across another chair. Though purchased for resale, I will probably be stuck with it for a long time.

    This chair has features covered by an 1869 patent for his cross brace and an 1876 patent for woven metal strips covered with patterned fabric for the seat and back:

    hunzinger 1a.JPG hunzinger 7a.JPG

    A virtually identical chair was included in the Brooklyn Museum Hunzinger exhibit. See "The Furniture of George Hunzinger:Invention and Innovation in 19th Century America", figure 100.

    Here's a link to something I wrote about this chair for Collector's Weekly:

    Yet another Hunzinger chair. | Collectors Weekly

    Well I've reached my picture limit. Will post a few more below.

    RM
     
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  2. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    More pix of the Hunzinger chair:

    hunzinger 4a.JPG

    This is the cross brace covered by his 1869 patent. The 1876 patent covers the cloth covered wires for the seat and back.

    Here's the stamp with Hunzinger's signature and the patents present in the chair:

    hunzinger 6a.JPG

    RM
     
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  3. musicguy

    musicguy Moderator
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    Absolutely! Very nice RM

    Rob
     
  4. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thanks.

    RM.
     
  5. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    RM,

    Yet another beautiful clock! For a half-column & splat clock, this one has lots of bells and whistles: wonderful stenciling (love the upside down pineapples), nice multi-colored spandrels on the dial, and a killer glass (borrowing a descriptive term from Chris Brown). As you note, the movement is a type 8.211 of unknown make, going by Snowden Taylor's 1980 Bulletin article. This movement was later renumbered as a type 8.221 and was assigned to Langdon & Jones as the maker. This later numbering is captured in the Excel version of Snowden's table. However, this particular movement also points out an error in the spreadsheet, as it is also given the type number 10.211. If you understand Snowden's methodology, it's impossible for movements in different subtypes (8 vs. 10) to have completely identical shop details. I've pointed out these errors in the Excel version on the message board before. A group of Cog Counter members has been tasked with updating and correcting the spreadsheet. Hopefully, that effort won't take too long.

    Your chairs, which are almost works of art, fall into a category that my grandmother would have referred to as "no sit on chairs". She had a set of rosewood dining room side chairs (c. 1840s) scattered about the house as accent pieces. They were notoriously fragile, and woe on you if you attempted to sit on one. We inherited a couple of them, and one was unfortunately shattered during transportation.

    Mike
     
  6. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thanks for your input and kind comments.

    I do now recall reading about how the movement was renumbered and the attribution was changed, if I recall correctly, from an "unknown" to a Langdon and Jones product. Am I correct in also stating that Jones, after the passing of Langdon, continued to make this movement for a time for clocks with his label (E.K. Jones) and others?

    Yes, look but don't sit...which will significantly limit it's salability to a few potential furniture nerds (like myself) who realize how relatively few old chairs, including Hunzinger chairs using his 1876 patent, retain their original upholstery treatments. I've seen other chairs which once had the same cloth covered mesh replaced by twine or rope. I do believe there is something that helped preserve the original seat on my chair. If one examines the corners of the seat frame, there is a nail hole in each. I believe at one point, someone nailed a board to the seat. So they sat on that, possibly with a cushion as well, and prevented further damage! Great. Now I have 2 Hunziger's with a rare survival of original upholstery in world that truly doesn't really care anymore.

    I did recently take it to a show. I was told by one knowledgeable dealer who handles much furniture that it was the best item there but no, he didn't want to write the check for the correct amount. Anyhow, I didn't want people sitting on it. Here's what I printed out and placed on the seat:

    yoda 2.jpg

    Got quite a few chuckles, I must say.

    RM
     
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  7. Raymond Rice

    Raymond Rice Registered User
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    RM, she IS quite pretty! (and the chair is wonderful) Keep on posting this great stuff.
    Ray Rice
     
  8. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thanks for your kind comment!

    RM
     
  9. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    It's almost as though she's looking out of a window in her magnificent home.

    The central design on the Splat reminds me somewhat of the face of a big, fluffy-eared dog. I can't escape that impression. There's something for the kid in me I suppose. :chuckling:

    Thank you for sharing these very special, elegant items with us RM.
     
  10. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thanks for you kind comment.

    I do think the splat design on this particular clock is one of the more shall I say "non-representational" ones I have seen. More a collection of elements than an image, e.g., a bowl of fruit or flowers, as far as I can tell. Note how the designs flanking the center seem to be echoed in the corners of the tablet? There are definitely 2 upside-down pineapples.

    It's almost like a Rorschach inkblot test?

    8.jpg

    One might interpret the pattern as many things??

    RM
     
  11. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    "Inkblot" ? No thanks... :eek: I'd rather "interpret" cloud patterns. :chuckling:

    I suppose the Splat does tie together the colors and style used on the two columns.

    It's nice use of patterns whatever the design artist was thinking of or trying to convey.
     

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