Age & value

Greg Crockett

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Apr 13, 2001
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The rules here provide that we give no dollar value of anything. I would suggest checking a copy of a price guide for such info.

The name in the watch may be that of the jeweler who sold it, however, it would appear your watch was made about 1912 by the Illinois Watch Co. If I'm using the right number to look up the date.

Boss was maker of the case. It was common at that time for the watch to be made by one company and the case to be made by a case maker.

It's hard to say why your watch stopped. I would suggest taking it back to the one who fixed it and have him correct the problem. It has nothing to do with you unless it was dropped. It may be overbanked, as caused by a loose roller jewel or any one of dozens of various problems.

Winding it every day is ok if you intend to use it. Sometimes, I may wind a pocket watch several times a day if it's in my pocket. No big deal.

There is no such thing as "over-winding" a watch or clock. Unless someone would use the term to imply the mainspring is broken.

Best regards,
Greg
 
K

Kimo

Jewels: If you open up the watch and look very closely at the mechanical workings inside you will see a couple of tiny bright red dots here and there. Those are the jewels. They are synthetic rubies. They have no real value as gemstones but the reason they are in there is to provide low friction, extra long wearing points for the moving parts to move against. Without them the metal mechanism in a watch would wear out fairly quickly. Most decent quality watches of the age of yours will have 15 jewels. Better quality watches tended to have more such as 17 or 21, but there rapidly comes a point, perhaps 23 jewels, beyond which more jewels serve no practical or functional purpose other than to trick buyers into thinking they should pay more.

As for why has your watch stopped, yes it is possible that it being knocked off your dresser by your cat could have broken something inside it or something along the lines of what Greg said. One additional possibility is that the jeweller did not do a proper job of servicing it. A proper cleaning/servicing is a fairly costly operation by a skilled watchmaker that involves a complete disassembly, cleaning, replacing broken or worn parts, reassembly, and adjusting for accuracy. I don't know whether the store where you took it did a proper job, but some jewelry stores these days don't have access to skilled watchmakers and just dunk a watch in an ultrasonic cleaner, dab a bit of new watch oil here and there and polish the case for a relatively modest fee. If a watch is not properly serviced problems can quickly come back. It is like an old car - you can do some quick and dirty things to make it run for a short while, but unless you actally restore the engine to proper specs it will be short-term at best and cause more internal damage in the long run.

25 YEARS: The marking on the inside of your case that says "25 YEARS" indicates that it is not solid gold. Normally watches of this vintage are gold filled which means there is a very, very thin layer of gold bonded to the surface of a base metal, often something like brass. Back then, as Greg mentioned, when you bought a watch the first thing you did was to decide which movement you wanted (the mechanical part) and then you decided which case you wanted to put it in. You bought them separately and the jeweler would install the mechanical part in the case. Many jewelers also had dials made with their name on them, such as yours, for advertising their stores. Every case maker used different advertising gimmicks to get people to buy their cases and there was pretty much no government oversight so the makers could get away with a lot. One of the gimmicks used was to adverise cases as lasting XX years before the gold would wear through to the base metal underneath as an indication of quality. Of course this was silly since there was no way to compare wear and tear from one person to the next, but it was effective for marketing purposes and it gave the average person a chance to own a watch with a case that looked almost as good as the solid gold ones that wealthier people usually had their watch movements installed in.

[This message was edited by Kimo on October 22, 2003 at 14:25.]

[This message was edited by Kimo on October 22, 2003 at 14:27.]
 

Tom McIntyre

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You should have gotten it properly serviced for $100.

The back cover protects the inner back cover. Not all watches have them. They are really a relice of when the inner cover had holes in it for winding and setting the watch.

Tom McIntyre
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Kent

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Charlie:

Check out What You Need To Know About Watch Repair at Wayne Schlitt's Elgin Website:
http://www.midwestcs.com/elgin/help/watch_repair.html
(you should copy this link and paste it in your browser address bar since directly linking to this website from the NAWCC Message Board is not possible)

Kent

That guy down in Georgia :)
 

Jon Hanson

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they are now incomplete! :frown:

What is the point here? :rolleyes:

Jon Hanson, NAWCC #8801
Founder and President Chapter 149, The Early American Watch Club
 

Kevin W.

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Not sure what you,re talking about Jon, someone asks a question and someone answers.
Are you refering to the person who asked a question and started this thread?

*********** and chapter 111,
NAWCC # 0158976
 

Jon Hanson

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NO!

Jon Hanson, NAWCC #8801
Founder and President Chapter 149, The Early American Watch Club
 

Kevin W.

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Jon what are you talking about?
No doesn,t mean much.

*********** and chapter 111,
NAWCC # 0158976
 

Kent

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terri:

See the reply under your new thread.

Kent

That guy down in Georgia :)
 

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