Advise on French clock case

Discussion in 'Case Construction, Repair & Restoration' started by focusrsh_b07732, Jun 22, 2020.

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  1. focusrsh_b07732

    focusrsh_b07732 Registered User
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    Dec 17, 2009
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    I have a French wall clock, circa 1933.
    There are two or three places around the outer front edge where pieces of wood have broken away. I don't know if this was some kind of molding, or veneer. I'm not a wood-case guy. But since I've put so much time into the movement and am about to sink $$ and time into the dial, I thought the case should look good too.

    Here are photos of the clock and two example of the broken edge.

    Not that this clock has no significant value! Except that it is about 90 years old and I have some respect for that.

    So, how does one repair this? Do I glue some wood back on and sand it to match the contour? Or...?
    All suggestions much appreciated.

    IMG_7164.JPG IMG_7165.JPG Sainson Grenoble,front.jpg
     
  2. tracerjack

    tracerjack Registered User
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    Jun 6, 2016
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    Do you know what material the finished surface is? I can’t tell from the photos.
     
  3. focusrsh_b07732

    focusrsh_b07732 Registered User
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    Dec 17, 2009
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    If I understand your question, you are asking about the black finish. (The underlying material is wood, I think.) No, I don't know what it is. Semi-gloss black. Not shellac or varnish. Simply paint, I think.
     
  4. tracerjack

    tracerjack Registered User
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    Jun 6, 2016
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    Yes, you answered my question. Then I think I would use a wood filler to build up the depressions. It would take patience and many layers. The ones that are non sanded have a toothpaste consistency and can be easily sanded down to a smooth finish. Matching black is much harder than it seems, so if you wanted to preserve what painted finish is there, it may take patience again to get something to match. Easy if you plan to repaint the whole case. However, I keep getting the feeling that the case might have been coated with gesso in order to get a smooth finish. I know it was used for gilding wood, but can’t say for sure if it was used with paint. Hopefully, someone else will offer some insight into your problem.
     

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