Adamantine clock identification

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by time is money, Jan 29, 2017.

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  1. time is money

    time is money Registered User

    Jun 30, 2013
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    Just had this brought to me . It requires replacement of the little double suspension spring. I was able to locate a replacement but am a bit stumped as to the age or origin . I am guessing it is french bur can fin no markings except for a stamped # on the back of the movement...I have viewed ,probably several hundred photos and nothing I find has a dial or movement that looks anything like it. It's heavy as a boat anchor . Has anyone sen one with a front like this before? attachment.jpg
     

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  2. leeinv66

    leeinv66 Moderator
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    Mar 31, 2005
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    It looks like a French clock with a brocot escapement. Can't tell you anything more without seeing the movement. Also, the case will be marble or slate, not Adamantine.
     
  3. time is money

    time is money Registered User

    Jun 30, 2013
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    Yes the case is slate or marble-when looking at the inside of it ,it appears to be cemented together with some sort of concrete I generally only work on american wood and brass movement wooden case clocks.
     
  4. JTD

    JTD Registered User

    Sep 27, 2005
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    Yes, this is the typical construction for these marble clocks. These clocks are very common and quite popular but you must beware of one thing - always pick it up from the bottom, because far from being 'cemented together with some sort of concrete' as you mentioned, these clocks are held together with wire and plaster of Paris. If held from the top or any protruding part of the case they easily fall to pieces and shatter.

    Been there, done that............!

    JTD
     
  5. time is money

    time is money Registered User

    Jun 30, 2013
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    Good to know--Thanks. This one belongs to a collector and he wanted me to see if I could tell why the suspension rod and bob was "wobbling all over the place". One look inside the back and immediately saw that the little "double " suspension spring had one of the little spring strips broken...I asked him if he ever moved it or carried it around with the suspension rod still in place and told him that he should never pick it up and move it from one location to another without first removing the suspension rod. He tells me that you can't remove it without removing the movement!--I showed him how to gently lift the rod off of the spring from the rear ..He was shocked......He's been collecting for about 50 years -Could not believe he had no idea......
     
  6. jmclaugh

    jmclaugh Registered User

    Jun 1, 2006
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    It is a French marble clock probably dating to the last quarter of the 19th C with a through the dial suspension adjustment (probably Brocot) and a visible Brocot deadbeat escapement which always make these clocks more attractive. It is quite common for the movements in such clocks to be unmarked. The pendulum can be tricky to remove on them especially if they strike and have a bell or worse a gong in the way hence why they are more likely to suffer from being moved with the pendulum in situ.
     
  7. time is money

    time is money Registered User

    Jun 30, 2013
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    Yes the spiral gong is in the way ,but you can reach by it and unhook the rod and let it lay in the bottom of the case .OR remove it by bringing the top of the rod below the gong ...Easy with a pair of mini long nose pliers or a pair of medical hemostats-I like to get hemostats and file or grind the locking teeth off so that they don't lock . I have several that still lock and several that don't , and the curvede end on's are very handy.
     

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