Acceptable gain or loss for timekeeping, weekly.

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by Kevin W., Apr 5, 2008.

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  1. Kevin W.

    Kevin W. Registered User
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    Apr 11, 2002
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    I work at the Veritas Tools machine shop.
    Nepean, Ontario, Canada
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    I just checked my Urgos box clock tonight.It was slow by about a minute and a half.
    is this decent time keeping?
    What is a vaerage for a week for a good running clock, american or german made.I realize the higher end clocks likely do keep better time than my Urgos.
     
  2. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    I think you'll find replies vary widely. Very subjective - what collectors seek or accept. I'm not an accuracy zealot. A few mins. a week keeps me happy altho you KNOW I'll be shooting for the moon when this pinwheel is finished and on display. Again and also; I'm sure expectations vary for particular clocks.
     
  3. leeinv66

    leeinv66 Moderator
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    For me, it depends on the type of movement. Spring clocks, up to 4 minutes a week if they are American or up to 2 minutes a week if they are German or English. Weight clocks, less than 1 minute a week, no mater where they are made. But as Scottie said, different folks will have different expectations.
     
  4. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    If you have the patience, you can get it down to within a minute or so, but only adjust the regulation once a week on winding day.
     
  5. Thyme

    Thyme Banned

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    Ah, yes. A Jacquot pendulum taught me that. :clap:

    I get really nervous when most of my 25 (or so) clocks are all running accurate to within one or two minutes per week. :eek: I guess I'm doin' sumpthin' right. That's due to a weekly fine adjustment of the pendulum bob. :thumb:

    Of course, sometimes some will drift suddenly to about 5 minutes per week, with no apparent reason. Then I wonder why: is it temperature, changes in humidity, barometric pressure, or all of the above? :???: No matter what - we can't change those factors much, can we?

    I have one clock with VERY worn, sloppy bushings, yet it keeps accurate time to a minute or two per week (!). When it stops running, I'll re-do the bushings... So what's the hurry? :???: :?|

    Even so, considering when these clocks were made, over a century ago, maintaining 1-5 minutes per week fluctuation was considered "state of the art" technology then; and time (and the way it was perceived) for those who lived in that period, only needed to be accurate, not precise.

    Historically, that's something to ponder...
     
  6. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    Kevin
    I'd just reinforce what Scottie says and summarize:

    Actual timekeeping depends on:
    • Room temperature
    • What sort of clock it is
    • How well maintained it is
    • How often it is wound (unless it is electric)
    • If synchronous electric, how good is the accuracy of the power supplier?

    Acceptable timekeeping depends on:
    • Yourself!

    Quartz thowaway versus iron gothic clock with verge and foliot - which one would you rather have? I know which!
     
  7. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    I would also chime in (no, not that) that my expectations are lower for spring-driven hairspring movements than for spring-driven pendulum movements. Generally, I am correct in having such lower expectations. That said, however, I have a couple of Ingraham hairspring banjos that are very accurate (and consistent) throughout the week. So much so, that I am afraid to fiddle with the regulation in even the slightest degree for fear that I will hex the whole damn thing! Now having said that, I expect them to go all to hell this week.
     
  8. Kevin W.

    Kevin W. Registered User
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    I work at the Veritas Tools machine shop.
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    I expect my weight driven clocks to be more accurate than my spring driven.In most cases the clocks i compare to each other have been repaired where needed and cleaned and oiled.
    On a side not i have seen watches run very accurately that have not been cleaned or oiled for years.
    All good points given here. :cool:
     
  9. Mike Phelan

    Mike Phelan Registered User

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    Watch movements are sealed against the environment better than most clocks, maybe?
    In theory, all other things being equal, weights are better than springs for timekeeping, except maybe for fusees.

    However, that only applies if you take the sentence above into account.

    Examples would be: spring-driven French mantel clock with Brocot escapement - 1 minute per week, weight-driven lantern clock with verge and balance wheel, 45 minutes per week!
     

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