A11 spec. no. 94-27834

Discussion in 'Wrist Watches' started by 1943marine, May 31, 2015.

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  1. 1943marine

    1943marine Registered User

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    #1 1943marine, May 31, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 31, 2017
    Hi,
    I just bought a Bulova A11 Watch 1943 and the more I learned about the spécifications A, B, and C the more I am confused with:confused:

    How come a 1943 movement can be in a 1943 case and still have the 1941 spec ( 94-27834 ) write on.

    Can someone light out my life with.

    Thanks
     
  2. Cary Hurt

    Cary Hurt Registered User

    Dec 16, 2005
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    The 1941 specification was the government requirement for the technical details of the watch. That specification continued in use until superseded by a different set of requirements. A watch produced in 1943 would have been required to meet the 1941 specification.

    It's sort of like a patent that is issued in one year, but covers products made years later. They would still be marked with the original patent date.
     
  3. 1943marine

    1943marine Registered User

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    Thanks Cary for this information,

    AB
     
  4. Don Dahlberg

    Don Dahlberg Registered User
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    I think what he is asking has to do with the modifications made in the A11 specifications. For example, in September 1944 the specifications 94-27834-C were put out and said:

    A11C.jpg

    Modification D came out in June 1945 and stated that the letter "D" be used on the back of the watch.

    I do not know when the modification B came out. If they were modified before his 1943 date, the back should have a "B" at the end of the number. If the specifications were modified after his watch was completed, then there would be no letter at the end of the number.

    Don Dahlberg
    NAWCC volunteer
     
  5. 1943marine

    1943marine Registered User

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    #5 1943marine, Jun 2, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 31, 2017
    Thanks Don,

    I will try to be more specific as may be my post was not clear enough ( I am canadian french speaking )

    Down you have the US military wristwatch spécifications.

    The first specification appear to be publish 2 november 1942 ( 94-27834A )
    The second specification appear to be publish 22 February 1943 ( 94-27834B ) and so on in the list.

    My question is how long it takes before the publish date and the making of the Watch by Bulova or other that takes in effect.
    As the movement was made in 1943 and the back of the Watch is AF43 it seems that something is missing in information

    Thanks and appreciate any answer

    Andre Brunet US%20MIL%20Watch%20Specs.jpg

    US%20MIL%20Watch%20Specs.jpg
     
  6. Don Dahlberg

    Don Dahlberg Registered User
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    I know from the Hamilton records that they would make a contract for a few hundred watches to be delivered under specific specifications. For example, there were dozens of contracts for the 4992B master navigation watch.

    I do not think the government could change the specification for that specific contract. At least they have the give the watch company time to make the changes. I would think the changes would only effect contracts issued in the future. Sometimes it took more than a year to fill a specific contract and different contracts overlap in time. I would also assume you could fill an old contract with improved watches with the approval of the specific military receiving the watch.

    I also know from the Hamilton records that watches did not hang around in the factory once they were completed. They got them shipped to as soon as they were done, but they would send 120 for one contract out, then 150 watches for another contract out. Months later they would send out 130 watches out for the first contract. The contracts overlapped in time.

    As a volunteer at the NAWCC Library and Research Center, I scanned all the contract and specifications documents we have for military watches. Most of these are for Hamilton watches. Members can check this CD out.

    Don Dahlberg
    NAWCC volunteer
     
  7. John Arrowood

    John Arrowood Registered User
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    Some years ago I worked in a technical library where we had access to historical files of specifications and standards on a microfilm service. I suspect there are some university/colleges with engineering libraries where these can still be accessed. That would be another source for the documents.
     

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