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A Trip to Basel.

Allan C. Purcell

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While I was going to spend a week on a boat going slowly down the Rhein from Köln to Basel, I decided to take along for reading David S Landes book "Revolution in Time" The charm of his book is you can open it anywhere, and know just where you stand in time, and as you start to read you forget what went before, while the story you are reading grips you, and the next thing you know its the end of that chapter. I remember when I first read the book many years ago, I found that much of it when over my head, which I think inspired me to learn more, I have over the years always had it somewhere near me, a quick look at the index soon put me right, if you did not get the answer you wanted, you soon found where to look. The Notes run to 176 pages, you could say another book. Like all books of this nature, time and research find out more and more, which happens very little in Landes book.
Though that could be. I have not yet learned enough, but I do find now I have the strength to check some of his tales, and that in itself is a thank you.

to be cont....

There are only two things that define time, the big bang, and the birth of mankind to measure the echo´s
 

Allan C. Purcell

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While I was going to spend a week on a boat going slowly down the Rhein from Köln to Basel, I decided to take along for reading David S Landes book "Revolution in Time" The charm of his book is, you can open it anywhere, and know just where you stand in time, and as you start to read you forget what went before, while the story you are reading grips you, and the next thing you know its the end of that chapter. I remember when I first read the book many years ago, I found that much of it went over my head, which I think inspired me to learn more, I have over the years always had it somewhere near me, a quick look at the index soon put me right, if you did not get the answer you wanted, you soon found where to look. The Notes run to 176 pages, you could say another book. Like all books of this nature, time and research find out more and more, which happens very little in Landes book.
Though that could be, I have not yet learned enough, but I do find now I have the strength to check some of his tales, and that in itself is a thank you.


IMG_0384 (2).JPG Just one of many watches in the Basel Museum. Though let me start with the name of this Museum. The little pamphlet has given on entrance as the title "Historisches Museum Basel" under this the "Barfüsserkirche. Haus zum Kirschgarten, and Musikmuseum. Only when you go on the net and ask for Clock & Watch Museum do you find it. Ask people in Basel where it is, they don´t know of a Clock & Watch Museum. I did ask in two other museums and got the same reply. Though when we got there, the staff were more than pleased to see us and sad to say we had the museum to ourselves. So for one and half hours, we spent our time photographing everything on site.

IMG_0416 (2).JPG These two are just to wet the appetite. and when I have worked it out I made a couple of small films to show you, and I did copy the writeups on the wall, I now need to match them with the watches, this could take a while.

To be cont.....

Allan.

There are only two things that define time, the big bang, and the birth of mankind to measure the echo´s
 

Ethan Lipsig

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Basel is a lovely city. I can imagine you reading Landes drifting on your boat under our hotel window.

2016-09-16 17.05.11 Stitch.jpg

My wife and I haven't been to its Watch & Clock museum, which I did not know it had, but we spent considerable time in Basel's wonderful art museums. If you are still there and have the time, I highly recommend visiting the Fondation Beyeler. Better yet, also take the wanderweg from Beyeler to visit the very interesting Vitra campus just across the border in Germany, or vice versa. <span style="font-weight:bolder;">Vitra | Tobias Rehberger’s 24-Stop Walk</span>. I wish we had done that. Next time we will.

Best regards
 

Allan C. Purcell

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Thank you, Ethan, you and your wife seem to be further down the river than we were, we were only a few minutes from the centre, see my tourist map below. I have put a ring round where the boat was berthed. By No. 5 you will see Steinenberg Str. here at no. 4 is the headquarters of the museum, and for next time you could phone or email Miss Gudrum Piller there, who then will fix a tour for you, in English, where the Clocks & Watches are is only three minutes walk away. The Art museums are three minutes the other way. Sorry to say we only had one day on this tour, but next time it will be longer.

11-23.JPG
 
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Ethan Lipsig

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Allan, you wrote "Ethan, you and your wife seem to be further down the river than we were, we were only a few minutes from the centre, see my tourist map below. I have put a ring round where the boat was berthed."

In fact, our hotel, Les Trois Rois, was on the bank of the river immediately adjacent to your "ring". It is a grand place. I highly recommend its Michelin *** Cheval Blanc restaurant . Consider going there the next time you're in Basel.
 

Allan C. Purcell

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Ethan that really is a good idea, it confirms we were very near last week, you will know the photographs below, took on my way to the Museum.

IMG_0336.JPG IMG_0352.JPG IMG_0339.JPG
 

Dr. Jon

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The Haus zum Kirschgarten where the way he's are is wonderful.

When I was there I blundered across the Midge built prototype of Huber's constant force timekeeper.

It has quite a history. If you missed seeing it and do not know about, go back and check it if you can.

Long write up on it in " Pioneers of Precision Timekeeping"

Huber was from Basel.
 
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Allan C. Purcell

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We were only there from 10.00 Am till 19.00 Jon. In the main, we were looking at watches, plus Daniel De St Leu, did not find one.

That Huber-Mudge must be elsewhere in the building, my copy of Precision Time-keeping is here somewhere, but where? I will find it,

This bit below should help, I know what to look for next time.

Thanks for the tip.

 

Dr. Jon

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When I saw it it was with the Basel clocks and very inconspicuous. It looked so out of place I took several photos that show more than the link but less than the Pioneer article.

Several AHS papers also discuss it but you need to see the Pioneer article first.

The object has a complex history.

Also the museum catalogs were wonderful and the only reasonable priced items I saw there, but it was about 10 years ago.
 

Allan C. Purcell

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On the trip to Basel Jon, I took some 300 photographs, and quite a lot of course were of Swiss pocket watches. So when I got home I started to sort them out. None of course by the Huber-Mudge clock. which I may have seen, but sadly ignored. It was, if you don´t mind the pun, a matter of time. We did not have enough, plus the kind chap at the museum gave us the address of the head office, and that the boss would be pleased to see us, ( I had the De St Leu watch with me) but he would be going home at 17.00Hrs. So we left the museum around 16.00Hrs and walked down to their office at No. 4 Steinenburg Street. It turned out the boss was on holiday and his second was out, but she would soon return, so we waited but were out of luck. Since then the one we waited for. wrote me a nice letter, telling me they knew nothing about De St Leu, other than he went to the UK. She then quoted all the information I had sent to her in my De St Leu file that I had sent to her. Strange:( Maybe a nice way of saying "Don´t contact us we will contact you". So why this story? I think I have learned that the next time I am in Basel or elsewhere, I should research the Museum and the people who run it. A kind of learning curb. I have over the years done, just that, though I don´t travel as much as I used to.

So back to the three hundred photographs, I am still sorting them out, plus in between, I have made up an album of the trip. I do that each time we travel, not that anyone looks at it, but I need to know where I was, and why. "Bravo 26-09 " was put in the car by the "Globus" a firm that looks after your car while you are away, and chauffeurs you to the boat and vice versa. We started in Koln. (Cologne).


66-9.JPG

While making the album I then noticed I had on the way to the museum, taken photographs at random of things I thought were of interest. (To me)
One of these had high up on the building three figures. It was then enlarged for the album, so better to see what the figures were. Underneath these three, were the words "Les Trcis Rois" (The Three Kings) I had to laugh at myself, it was the very hotel that Ethan Lipsig had stayed at, and told me how nice it was.

66-6.JPG The original photograph, and the one I enlarged later.

IMG_0365.JPG

IMG_0345.JPG This photograph is only of interest if you are going back to Basel, to me, a time saver. I took this standing with my back to the very large Art Museum. If I were to walk straight ahead and keep left, a little after the church is the clock & watch museum. If I were to turn right, I would be in Steinenburg Street, and has said at number 4 is the head office of the museum. A quick look at the above map (See 5) you will find it is an easy walk from the "Wettstein Bridge".

Allan.

To be Cont......

PS: Jon, I could not find my copy, so there is one on the way from Jeff Formby:
 
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Dr. Jon

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Here is one of my shots of the Huber Mudge.

DSCF0101.png

This is one of the more typical clocks near it so the Mudge work stands out.

DSCF0099_r.png

I shot these in late fall of 2011. Items have probably been moved
 
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Dr. Jon

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I did a very long time ago and it was very brief.

I took in a Bagnollet, A Hourier self wind (Which I think was later assessed as counterfeit) and a Berthoud maring chronometer. What really impreswsed me was that most of the very fine old watches on offer had US retailer's names on them.

When I was there the exhibits were really for hard core enthusiasts,. I saved a 50 CHF note from that visit and when I got to Basel in 2011 no one would take it. They had been called in and replaced,

The Kirschgrten is much more diverse museum and its watches and clocks are superbly displayed
 

Allan C. Purcell

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The Kirschgrten is a much more diverse museum and its watches and clocks are superbly displayed.
Jon, "Pioneers of Precision Time-Keeping" arrived today. First I have to say, I never had a copy, that´s why I could not find it, I only wish I had.

The book is full of information, like the balance of the Mudge lever was changed. ( The back-plate showing the original Mudge "Queen Charlotte" type of temperature compensation was removed 60 to 80 years ago (see also fig. 19.) (Written 1955 /56- so altered c1885-1884) I wonder if it was replaced since then? Nothing in "it´s About Time" though he was only interested in the escapement.

66-22.JPG

There are lots more, though I will keep to the Huber-Mudge story. I have read it through, and I shall read it again today, and again tomorrow. My first impression is the author finished it very nicely, and I wonder why I have not seen this information elsewhere. At the moment I am itching to get back to Basel. Thanks indeed for telling me about this book. I must also re-read Gould on this.

Best wishes,

Allan.

PS: Sorry folks, the Mudge watch above is the "FLINT WATCH"
More on this later.
 
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Ethan Lipsig

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Zedric asked "Did you also visit the Beyer Clock & Watch Museum [in Zurich]?" I did, but not during my Basel trip.

IMG_4444.JPG
 

Dr. Jon

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I suspect the primary reaspn for the book Pioneers of Precision Timekeeping was to record the conference dealing with the Huber Mudge watch and to keep its content out of the pages of regular journal.

At any rate I have long been amused at the number of watch enthusiasts who visit Basel and miss one of the most important, controversial, and interesting timepieces ever built. I blundered into it and I needed several months to get to the "Pioneers" story. It deserves to made more accessible
 

Allan C. Purcell

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I agree with you on this, and I wonder why we have not seen this book quoted more often. Huber is not mentioned in Rupert Gould´s book "The Marine Chronometer, or by Paul Chamberlain, in "It´s About Time" though both were published long before 1955. I have to ask, did they know about Huber and Mudge. Chamberlain and Gould worked to get Chamberlain, the chance to see the Queen Charlotte watch, and to open it for examination, which did happen. The written story by Chamberlain is pure excitement. Why do I start here with that watch?

In "Precision Timekeepers" The foreword is by Col. H. Quill. R.M. (The man who Harrison on the Map).

This foreword is most important, as Quill goes through the six titles articles, he gives his own thoughts, and in fact, we have six small articles, and then the originals by those who attended this symposium. From the start, you get the feeling you have to read the piece about the "Queen Charlotte"
watch, and it turns out without this information, some of the conclusions, don´t add up. I am still reading this book, and more will come out of this, as I try to find something that mentions their conclusions later. I am at the moment beginning to believe them, so we will see how it comes together later.

to be cont...
 

Allan C. Purcell

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A small quote from the foreword by Col. Quill.

It was quite fortuitous that most of the articles in this book ever came to be written. In 1955 an attempt was being made to select timekeepers of exceptional interest for inclusion in the "Five Centuries of British Timekeeping Exhibition" and naturally John Harrison´s H.5, Mudge´s "Queen Charlotte" watch, and the "bounty " timekeeper by Larcum Kendall were amongst the first that came to mind.

However, John Harrison`s H.5. had not been cleaned for years and in consequence, it was tarnished and unattractive in appearance, so much so that the organisers were very doubtful of including it in the exhibition. To have H: 5. cleaned seemed out of the question. mainly because of the urgency of time, for the exhibition was due to open in a few weeks. Also, there were very few watchmakers with the experience to tackle H.5.. and, as these experts were already up to their eyes in work, it seemed as if H.5. would have to be exhibited either in its woe-begone state or, alternatively, be left out of the Exhibition altogether.

( Don´t worry, Mr D. W. Barrett, C.B.E the Managing Director of Messers, Smiths got a Mr R. Good to clean it within a week)

to be cont....
 

Allan C. Purcell

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A titbit on H.5.

The watch, together with two clocks, remained in the Harrison family after his death and eventually passed to his great-granddaughter, Elizabeth Barton. She was not interested in them and passed them over to her father, Sir John Barton of the Royal Mint. In 1869 when she was an old lady;´..."I thought them rubbish but for which he gave me a handsome silver teapot and in my opinion, I had the best of the bargain". Subsequently, the watch was passed into the Robert Napier collection at Shandon and after Napier´s death, it was purchased by the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers.

The First Lever Watch. (This short piece from Col Quill)

A certain amount of mystery has always surrounded this watch. It will be noticed that Mr Good quotes the year of Hall Mark on the case as being 1759. and this date has been accepted for many years as being that in which bot the watch was constructed and also the detached lever escapement invented. However, as the result of recent research, the date is no longer accepted for either of these events. It is far more likely that Mudge invented the lever escapement in 1754, and that the "Queens Charlotte" watch was not made until 1770. The reasoning is as follows.

The year 1754 for the date of the invention of the Lever escapement is clearly stated by Mudge´s patron, Count von Bruhl, in a book published in 1785. His statement is repeated (but not necessarily confirmed) by the Rev. N. Maskelyne who quotes von Bruhl as saying that the invention was made....." about thirty years ago (1754)" (Note; The Brackets and the year 1754 are the original statement). In what form it was invented is not known, but the probability is that it was a model or even a mechanical drawing but certainly not a mechanism of watch size.

(I take it here, they did not know about Mudge´s clock, with the lever escapement.

It goes on,
The belief that the "Queen Charlotte" watch was made in 1770 would seem to have been proved by the results of the important research work of Mr Bellchambers who unearthed a second "Mudge" lever watch in Devonshire in 1960. This watch has since been described by Mr Clutton (" Antiquarian Horology" March 1960, page 47), but is now illustrated in Figs. 1 & 2. For simplicity sake, this watch will be referred to as the "Flint" Mudge, and it is remarkable because around the enamel dial is an inscription which proclaims; THE ORIGINAL WAS INVENTED AND MADE BY THOMAS MUDGE FOR HER BRITANNIC MAJESTY A:D: 1770" This statement must refer to the "Queen Charlotte" watch.

Another surprise today, nothing on Huber in Jonathan Betts book. "MARINE CHRONOMETERS AT GREEWICH"

Lots to come,

Allan.
 
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Dr. Jon

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Huber was not known to Gould and Quill. He probably also was not known the Geneva or Neuchatel people either, but there was a small group in Basel who knew of his work and they were both very aggrieved and isolated. Whne you see this timepeice try to imagine the sound of you know what hitting the fan. That AHS meeting must have been "interesting".

The remarkable thing is that Mudge was more taken with this concept than the lever.
 

novicetimekeeper

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I've been to Basel to exhibit but sadly it was all out of town, including the hotel which was an enormous modern building with a mature tree in the atrium.

I do like that penny moon watch, I am always drawn to penny moons.
 

Allan C. Purcell

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I now realise this book must be later than 1955, with no date in this copy. So I searched Google and it gives 1965. Yet there is also an AHS No 5 same title 1960. On this one, there is a print of Harrison on the cover, and that was the one I thought I had, so I am still looking. ( I Gave up, and then got lucky, a chap here in Germany has a copy, should be here by the weekend.

Jon. I am leaving the Huber-Mudge till the end of this piece, I don´t know if you have noticed but in each article, Mudge takes the lime light. Plus I think that's the way those experts worked it.

I am at the moment reading the Julien Le Roy piece, and that movement found on a flea market in Paris.

Among other interesting pieces that creep up on you, I found this,

Let us now consider the state of the horological industry in France and the background against which Le Roy worked. In 1722 Jean the Abbé de Hautefuille, who was Chaplain of the Royal Church of Saint Aignan at Orleans, published an account of his Rack lever escapement, which to all intents and purposes is the same as that patented by Litherland in England in1792. Le Roy must have been familiar with this work as it was published in Paris, It is probably worthwhile that at this time the Abbe´was 75 and died two years later. He had been publishing works on horology for over 40 years and had even claimed to have invented the balance spring before Huygens. Berthoud also used the rack lever escapement In his early marine chronometers (1754).

Yes, Jon, you are right, that really must have been a great meeting, yet somehow, it got left behind the curtain.
 

Allan C. Purcell

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66-23.JPG
The first lever watch by Mudge. Here you can see what was missing in the "Flint" watch.

Another Jem,

"It is presumed that the watch was acquired by, or presented to King George III, who subsequently gave it to his Queen (Queen Charlotte, 1744-1818), but this is surmised because the Royal Archives do not contain any reference to Mudge's watch or indeed to Count von Bruhl. However, from the letters referred to above, it is clear that Mudge was complimented several times by the Queen on the timekeeping qualities of her watch."

You did say the photographs were good, and these are more than expected, and the best I have ever seen of the "Queen Charlotte" watch, or indeed H. 5.
 

Allan C. Purcell

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So time to wrap this up, I have to say yet again, that I wished I had seen this book earlier, even it was another twenty years that I took up my first book on horology, (1975), plus when they formed this group in 1955, I was only twelve years+ old. I think the first four paragraphs make it clear what was wanted and what this group thought of it. After that, it´s for those who want to read it all, please buy a copy, though I am not going to ignore questions.

"At a meeting of the Antiquarian Horological Society in the Science Museum on 5th January 1961, Dr Eugen Gschwind produced a clock movement which, as far we in England were concerned was unknown. It was made in 1755 by Thomas Mudge to the design of the Swiss astronomer Johann Jacob Huber (Fig.72. See below). Dr Gschwind read brief extracts from Huber´s Diary, extracts which had been originally quoted in a paper read before a Swiss scientific society in 1892. Enough had been seen of the movement, and sufficient had been learned of the Diary in 20 minutes to excite keen interest: but Dr Gschwind was returning to Switzerland the following day. It has only been through the courtesy of the Historisches Museum Basle, and the Science Museum in London, and the good offices of Dr Gschwind, that a further opportunity has been given to us to make a more extensive examination of the movement. This has been carried out by Mr F. Janca.

Dr Gschwind evidently felt that the challenge which this timekeeper presented, and the perhaps controversial matters connected with it, were best explored by Mudge´s fellow country-men who can, we venture to hope, show the same honesty of purpose and an equal humility of spirit with which the great clockmaker himself has always been credited.

Included in a volume of the Transactions of the Naturforschenden Gesellschaft of Berne is a paper read by Professor J. H. Graf to the sister society in Basle on the occasion of its 75 anniversary in 1892. The Subject chosen for the lecture was J.J.Huber, and it is on this lecture, with its quotations from Huberß´s Diary that what follows is primarily based.

Professor Graf set out to establish the debt which Mudge owed to Huber. Graf´s repeated charge is very clear that Mudge improperly used Huber´s principles for the design of a free or constant force escapement in his Marine Timekeepers-the first, the Blue and Green. This design was presumably first incorporated in the Timekeeper made by Mudge to Huber´s instruction between June and October 1755 (Figs 73 and 82 see below).


66-40.JPG Fig. 72


66-38.JPG 66-36.JPG 66-39.JPG I put them all in.

I think in the end the conclusions were correct, and a thank you to the AHS for their very good symposium.



66-29.jpg I put this here, not only because I like it, it's because it usually starts for most people here with the Mudge lever watch, better know has "Queen Charlotte watch".
 

Dr. Jon

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So, next time in Basel go see the thing!!!
It is in an excellent museum and there are a lot of very interesting items on display so if traveling wityh a significant other that person can find much of interest and you can see this little known and appreciated cornerstone of horology. I used ot regard it as a dead end but now several contemporary makers are rvivied the concept in some "bulge bracket" watches. I wonder how many showing these at Basel have every gone to see the original
 

Allan C. Purcell

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I think it is only fair for those who have read this, and don´t have a copy, to say, the article by T. P. C. Cuss, F.B.H.L. "THe Huber / Mudge Timepiece with Constant Force Escapement". Finishes with these words.

"I think that the extracts from Mudge´s letters which I have quoted put beyond argument that the prime motive of all his labours from 1771 till his death was neither financial gain nor vain glory, but the love of his craft and the furtherance of it. If we now give the Swiss astronomer the credit which is his due, and which has so long been denied him, there appears to me at least no curtain ground from which to fasten upon Thomas Mudge a charge he was so anxious to avoid 200 years ago (now 250 years)

Allan.
 

Allan C. Purcell

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I was going to leave this thread, and let those who know far more to answer the gaps, but in this case, it seems unlikely. So why bother. Yesterday two small incidents occurred which got me thinking again about Thomas Mudge´s work. First, the post arrived early, and among the advertising material was the other copy of "Pioneers of Precision Timekeeping". In there are two photographs of the Thomas Mudge travelling clock owned then by Lord Polwarth. There is practically nothing said about the clock, and it took me a while to think it was there to show the talent of Mudge, or they did not know then about the escapement.

66-41.JPG This is the photograph of the Mudge´s travelling clock in the book, far more later.

The other incident was Tom Mcintyre talking travelling clocks in that thread on James F. Cole, and it popped into my head, "When were they first made". So I took out "Carriage Clocks by Charles Allix and Peter Bonnert"(1974) to see what they had to say on the subject. After learning Durer had painted a travelling clock in 1513, It struck me there was a lot of reading needed, but two or three pages(P18) later, there it was, the Thomas Mudge travelling clock, with photographs, with permission from Lord Polwarth. This time we get to see some of the histories about the workings of this clock.

Quote from the book,

"Readers will be aware of the importance of Thomas Mudge /1715-1784) both in connection with the development of timekeepers to enable navigators to find longitude at sea, and also as the inventor of the lever escapement which was the forbear of those used universally today n most clocks and watches. The beautiful small travelling clock, belonging to Lord Polwarth, shown in plate 1/21 is very important in its own right.
It is signed "THO: MUDGE, LONDON", and it has a lever escapement which, in the opinion of Mr Richard Good is earlier than that in the world-famous "Queen Charlotte" watch. This watch, with a Mudge lever escapement and date of 1769mhas long been considered the earliest detached lever escapement. Richar Good bases his view upon the fact that the escapement of the Polwarth clock is less developed than that in the "Queens Watch". The Polwarth clock is described briefly by Col. H. Quill in " Pioneers ofPiecision Timekeepers" where some of its provenience is given. A top view of the movement of this extraordinary clock is shown in Plate 22. It is to be hoped that someday Mr Good will write a full description eventually. A number of very excellent photographs already exist but have never been published. The late Philip Coole and Mr Bresford Hutchinson of the British Museum examined the piece in 1969. They discovered that the escapement and balance assembly had been repeatedly modified, almost certainly by Mudge himself as he proccéeded in the development of the final form.

66-43.JPG

I will leave it now, and see what comes out of further research.

Allan.
66-42.JPG
 

Allan C. Purcell

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I have stepped back to the Journals of the AHS 1962 to 65 and 1965 to 68. Of course, the music starts with the article by Mr Cecil Clutton on pages 306 to 308 of the March 1965 issue. He was most surprised about the findings in "Pioneers of Precision Timekeeping" I can believe his surprise, has he and George Daniels had just published their book on "Watches". Plus Charles Allix had just reviewed their böök in such a way that was offensive, and the mud flew, in the letters pages of the June issue. Though after these letters there is one by T.P. Camerer Cuss, called "Mudge and other Matter.s"

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To be cont...
 

Allan C. Purcell

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I realised, that going back to the conference in 1965 might help, and it was later I realised the first reading by Dr Gschwind was 1961. On opening my copy of the AHS December1959-September1962, so what do you do flip through it, or read the index? So I did both. It turns out Dr Gschwind was well known through the London section of the AHS. Nothing wrong with that, but it is not the impression one gets later. Make up your own mind.

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So to many of the members of the then AHS knew Dr Gschwind quite well.

I then carried on and found more information ln later copies to 1968.













66-47.JPG June 1965


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So that's it for now, I think one question stands out, when did Gschwind get hold of the Huber-Mudge clock.?

Allan
 

Dr. Jon

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As I understand it Gschwind borrowed it from the Museum. Probably he mare arrangements to take it to London shortly before doing so. It should not have been difficult since no had paid much attention to it after Graf's lecture which evidently went nowhere.

When I saw it, I had no idea what it was but I was fairly familiar with 18th century English work and this item caught my eye, but I was there with no prior knowledge and had my wife not gone off to look at the other exhibits I would not have had the time to kill by going and looking at clocks. Evidently, not a lot of visitors with interest watches looked at the clocks and for some reason the clock people did not think the Huber Mudge "Clock" to be noteworthy and even after all of that there was nothing in its display to mark the significance of it when I saw it.

I see this often in museums. The curators do not always have an engineers understanding of the significance of items they own. For example Technical and Arts Museum (Out of regard for Francophones, I an refraining from trying to render it in French) has the original Foucault gyroscope. Every inertial guidance system ever built is modeled on it. There is nothing marking its significance. Huber's timepiece is interesting to a much smaller group but it deserved more display signage than it gets.
 

Allan C. Purcell

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I brought this back from Basel, in was in the head office at No. 4 Steinenburg Strasse. Do you, like me, feel there is something missing?


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Dr. Jon

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Perhaps they do not want horology fanatics like us. In fairness, they have a lot of other items there and without them I might not have had time to spend on the small areas of my interest
 

Allan C. Purcell

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I think we should meet up in Basel sometime, and sort it out. "Uhrenmuseum" is not a long word in German. Your interests are much larger.
 

Allan C. Purcell

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I have been trying t get the two small films I made in the Basel Museum, but your machine won't accept them, any ideas how I can do that.

After our fifth jab for covid-19, we could put a plan together- in the meantime think about it-I am game.
 

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