• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

A Tale of Three 49s

MuseChaser

NAWCC Member
Feb 5, 2019
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I'll try and make this short, and it ends with a question or two...

My interest in clock repair started with replacing the suspension unit of our first 400-day, a 1932 Kern. Enjoyed it, and bought three more to learn on, all Schatz/JUF 49s. One had a white enamel face w/ the usual garland decoration and arabic numbers, one had a silver face with garland and arabic numberals, and one had a white enamel face with roman numerals. All three repairs and renovations went really well, and they lived in our house in a three-clock grouping for a few months. Coincidentally, my wife and I have three grown son, all married. I gave each couple one of these three clocks for Christmas this year, not realizing how much my wife had been enjoying them. She was actually kind of disappointed that I'd given them away, so I set out to replace them via the usual auction sites, so that she could continue to see them and think of our sons. The first one (clock, not son) I had originally purchased was the one with roman numerals. Strangely enough, finding another one of those proved to be VERY difficult. The silver face/arabic ones are everywhere, and the enamel/arabic ones are pretty available, too. Could NOT find one with roman numerals (that wasn't quartz) to save my life.... only one I found was on fleabay in sub-average condition (which i didn't care about.... but....) and the seller wouldn't go lower than $125~!! Anyway, I easily replaced the silver/arabic and the enamel/arabic clocks for very reasonable prices, and finally found a enamel/roman numeral one that I gritted my teeth and won the auction for, but I had to pay almost three times what I've paid for other 49s.... but hey, my wife is worth it, I guess.

Sooo... the questions...

Is there something about a roman numeral 49 that is rare and drives the value up? ...

or...

Are you guys messing with me on the auction site?!?!? ;)
 

Schatznut

NAWCC Member
Sep 26, 2020
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There's a lot of junk and a lot of strokers on that particular auction website. Many people seem to know only that it's a clock and therefore think it must be worth a lot of money; others have no idea what they've got. I've noticed the asking prices for 400-day clocks in general edging upward over the last year to 18 months. And sometimes a clock that is unusual or in especially nice condition or less common draws no notice whereas a beat-on, run-of-the-mill clock sells for serious money. Regarding my use of the word "unusual", notice I didn't say "rare" - any time that word appears in a listing it is a dead giveaway the owner wants too much money for it, notwithstanding the ten others just like it already on offer. And how many clocks have you seen where the owner says it was made by "Angemeldet"? Patience is a virtue, and if patience doesn't work, you might ask Ronell if they have the face you want in their inventory. I'm not sure what's happening with Horolovar since Chris Nimon's passing, but if it is still a going concern, that could be a good source too.
 
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etmb61

NAWCC Member
Oct 25, 2010
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The clocks with white enameled dials came as either Arabic or Roman. The model numbers were appended with the appropriate letters (A or R). The most common models as I've seen are 1206A and 1207A (plain or embossed support pillars).
1207_1208.jpg
I've never seen a model 1208R outside of brochures.

I have three, models 1206R and 1207R, all with undated plates. One has no name on the dial, one has Schatz in black script, and the last has Schatz in red script and "RR" for Remington Rand on the back plate. It took me several years to find them back when online sales had much more to offer.
45_Schatz_1207R.jpg

So yes they are more difficult to find.

Eric
 
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MuseChaser

NAWCC Member
Feb 5, 2019
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.....
I've never seen a model 1208R outside of brochures.

...

So yes they are more difficult to find.

Eric
Sigh... well, now you have....

SchatzRomanRed.jpg

At least I know I wasn't going crazy. The one I ended up winning recently and WAY overpaid for is a JUF, with no "Schatz" logo on the face nor on the backplate, but it should still end up being a pretty nice clock. Guess I have one son that got a little bit luckier than the others this time!
 

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