A Simple Foliot Skeleton

Discussion in 'Clock Construction' started by Scottie-TX, Sep 23, 2009.

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  1. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    #1 Scottie-TX, Sep 23, 2009
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2009
    I'm just a duffer an' maybe don't even have any bidness here but what th' 'eck. No postings fer two months. Shoot. I'll share one of my entry level attempts. If it doesn't fit the category - toss it out now before I go on or perhaps move it over to Clock Resto. It began life here as an "Anno Columbus" clock, busted dial and missing nearly everything except the wheels and verge staff - so a great candidate.
     

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  2. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    #2 Scottie-TX, Sep 23, 2009
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2009
    Rather than skeletonize the original plate decided rather to use it as a template and chose rosewood for mine. Rosewood is very hard and very nice to look at. After cutting the blank, held the blank and template together by hand to drill the first hole. Then I secured the two on that hole with a tight fitting dowel. Again, handholding, made a second hole much further down. Then I inserted another dowel in that hole. Now the two are pinned together securely with two dowels, to continue drilling the others. I could not drill the big holes, pinned. I made a centerfinder for them of dowel drilled on center, and marked their centers, separated plates and finished drilling large holes.
     

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  3. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    #3 Scottie-TX, Sep 24, 2009
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2009
    Plate completed, now the design. My initial thoughts were, "serpentine". However in sketching it, decided hole positions would not lend well to that design and decided on a straightline, simple in-line design with gothic peaks, top and bottom.
    The "T" and "F" marks you see are my reminder of orientation - Top and Front. This, I did, thruout the process.
     

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  4. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    Here's where my project hit a pothole. OUCH!
    I spent all this time, carefully keeping all in alignment, marking everything, etc., and at the very last step became careless.
    I attached the template sketch to the plate with double sided tape and commenced cutting.
    I used a 9" bandsaw. On the V E R Y first cut, the blade punched thru the bottom pillar hole and I KNEW my plate was scrap.
    I failed to position the template PERFECTLY on the plate.
    DANG.
     
  5. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    Next eve, made another plate. This time took little over an hour because I already had practise and still had all the tools, pegs, centerfinder, etc.
    Back to the template and attached correctly this time, taking my time, as rushing here would not be wise. 2nd was a charm, 'least I was very pleased with it. Here, the finished plate.
     

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  6. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    After trial assembly, removed three wheels from arbors and sanded off all the black goop on 'em to expose natural, dark grain. I opted out on the escape wheel as removing all the pins and wheel from arbor would not be wise. I considered crossing out hour wheel but decided against it.
    1. I'd need to make another wheel from laminate as this single piece wooden wheel would fail, crossed out.
    2. Crossings wouldn't really expose much more skeleton plate and,
    3. It would be the only crossed wheel unless I re-made and crossed all the others.
    Now I'll begin final assembly and testing.
     

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  7. bangster

    bangster Moderator
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  8. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    Thanks BONG! No esoteria or any monumental, documentable value here;
    Jes' me havin' fun.
     
  9. BLACK FOREST CLOCKS

    BLACK FOREST CLOCKS Registered User

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    Looks good. Keep it up.
     
  10. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    Finished now, I'll go back a few days: I did relent and sanded the Escape wheel. I made a depth gauge to return all pins to proper height. Then I sanded around the wheel with arbor in tact.
    You may enjoy the dial source. Debating it's dial since nearly day one, decided on this one. Nice? It's an embroidery ring! The dial is an embroidery loop and the quarter hour markers are kabob sticks! Ersatz engineering I know but still pleased overall and sanding the escape wheel was a definite improvement.
    'ell yes it works. Works GREAT!
     

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  11. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    So, "what now?"
    Another, of coarse!
    This one, a BUCO. THIS one was MADE to skeletonize.
     

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  12. leeinv66

    leeinv66 Moderator
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    And here I was thinking it was made to tell the time:D Nice work on the first one Scottie! I look forward to seeing what you do with this one.
     
  13. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    Ah, thanks Pee-Tah, but, "no". None of these clocks talk so they cannot tell time.
     
  14. Old_Timer

    Old_Timer Registered User

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    Sorry if this is a stupid question, but what is driving it?
    I don't see weights, spring barrel?
    Did you make this from plans, I would love to attempt this!
     
  15. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    Oh, indeed you can! Nah. Didn't make it. Tookthe clock pictured above and skeletonized it further. It is weight driven.
     
  16. RJSoftware

    RJSoftware Registered User

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    Bandsaws give me the heebee jeebees. I know how to use them, I just got this strong picture in my mind of a missing finger. Either that is my finger or worse yet one of my kids.

    Excellent use of embrodery ring. I would have never guessed.

    RJ
     
  17. Scottie-TX

    Scottie-TX Registered User
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    I do have some respect for a drill press. Mine is relatively small and can easily be stalled. Still, I never wear a necktie or longsleeve shirt when using it. 'course I seldom wear a necktie anyway.
    But a bandsaw. A bandsaw! Yes! I have a LOT of respect for a bandsaw. To a bandsaw, a finger is about the same as a shark sees an airline passenger hanging on to a floating seat - looks like a sardine on a cracker.
    Got my first wakeup last week. The machine was shut off. I threw the switch seconds ago. But bandsaws have large wheels that resemble flywheels and the saw freewheels after shutoff. Somehow I thought it was idle. Boy was I wrong and I found out in a split second. A finger is no contest for a bandsaw, even freewheeling after shutoff. I was thankful for the cheap lesson.
     

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