A simple click spring

bkerr

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Had a Seth Thomas Mantle clock show up this week with what the customer said was a broken spring on the time side. Took the hands off and removed the movement to find that the click spring was wrapped around the winding arbor. Wound the springs up and restrained them. Took the plates apart and found this wheel S2.


What was amazing to me was it did not take any teeth out of S1. There was a slight burr but I cleaned that up. I replace 4 trundles and then checked for bent arbors. Got lucky, nothing bent. But further up the train a bushing was knocked out of S3, polished arbors and now all back together and running. That simple click spring caused all that.

trundles.JPG
 

shutterbug

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Wow! I hope you did a complete service as long as you had it apart ;)
 

R. Croswell

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Had a Seth Thomas Mantle clock show up this week with what the customer said was a broken spring on the time side. Took the hands off and removed the movement to find that the click spring was wrapped around the winding arbor. Wound the springs up and restrained them. Took the plates apart and found this wheel S2.


What was amazing to me was it did not take any teeth out of S1. There was a slight burr but I cleaned that up. I replace 4 trundles and then checked for bent arbors. Got lucky, nothing bent. But further up the train a bushing was knocked out of S3, polished arbors and now all back together and running. That simple click spring caused all that.

View attachment 721760
What a mess! I'm not sure whether you may have had more than just the click spring responsible for this disaster. I can't see a click failure kicking out a bushing. Unusual that the main wheel exerted enough force to rip that lantern pinion without ripping some main wheel teeth.

I assume this is an open spring clock. When a click fails in this type of clock the shock is much less than with a barreled spring. The presence of a bushing indicates that the clock has had previous work, the bushing coming out indicates questionable work. What if lantern pinion had been worked on before and the trundles were not the correct length? Well the path forward is/was obvious.

RC
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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Maybe they wound it with the ole pipe wrench? Or, maybe tried to unwind it with the ole pipe wrench. :oops: Willie X
 
Last edited:

bkerr

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ST mantle clock, no spring barrels. You are right.

Yes I did service the clock. The time train looked good until I got to t3. The front plate bushing that had been put in was worn by better than a half pivot diameter almost straight across, the wear did not go outside the bushing. New bushings front and back then polish up the arbor ( actually in reverse) and it was good again.
Yes, someone was in the clock before, go figure it is 100 years old prox. My guess on the missing bushing was it was not put in properly. The other clue that I failed to mention was the plate screw and nuts were finger tight when I started. they would have never left the factory that way? Maybe a bushing that was left proud on the inside of the plate? Not sure. I have been getting in the habit of cutting in oil sinks on any bushing replacements and using a pivot cutter to make sure inside and out that the bushing is flush with the plate.
BTW I did check the plates for flatness when done and the screw and nuts tightened up as they should.
Now on to the next one.
 

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