A new Seth Thomas street clock weight, and fitting the original pulley to it.

Peter A. Nunes

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I've been restoring a Seth Thomas street clock, and part of the project is to have several missing pieces cast at a local foundry. I picked the new pieces up a couple of weeks ago, including this weight, and today we drilled and tapped the 5/8"-11 hole for the original brass pulley. I bought a new 17/32" drill bit (I always buy Cleveland bits) and let's just say it wasn't cheap! After drilling a pilot hole and enlarging it, we used the new bit to finish it off, being very careful to maintain plumbitude in both directions. We then used a taper tap to thread the hole, followed by a plug tap and a bottom tap. The pulley threaded in easily, as it should.

I decided to have the weight and the base doors (the other parts I mentioned) cast in ductile iron- mostly because the doors will be stronger than cast iron, and this clock is going to a new home in a public park, on a very busy street in a very busy downtown area. The hole in the weight proved very easy to drill and tap.


weight.jpg weight1.jpg weight3.jpg
 

Eric Ryback

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Re: A new Seth Thomas street clock weigh, and fitting the original pulley to it.

Peter,
Interesting way to to drill the pulley hole and maintain plumbitude!! I cast many parts and use a Meehanite certified foundry, costing a little more but have found this to be the most reliable for making cast iron parts. Are you trying to age your parts!!
 

Peter A. Nunes

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Re: A new Seth Thomas street clock weigh, and fitting the original pulley to it.

Peter,
Interesting way to to drill the pulley hole and maintain plumbitude!! I cast many parts and use a Meehanite certified foundry, costing a little more but have found this to be the most reliable for making cast iron parts. Are you trying to age your parts!!
With two of us watching, we were able to achieve nearly perfect plumbitude. The pulley is a bit bent in relation to its threaded shaft- I've yet to straighten it. I like to call leaving new castings out in the rain "seasoning" them. Since this will be blasted and painted, it doesn't matter, really.

In New England we lack fundamentalist Germanic sects like the Meehanites. I would have had these parts cast at a Shaker foundry, but it was too far to drive! The Italians did a fine job, though. I happened to pick up the parts the day they were doing a pour- I hung to the side and watched for an hour- fascinating! The crew of 15 workers was the best part- young macho types, shirtless, all the way to a 75 year old stooped over man, who has probably been there since the 1950s. It's a great old-line foundry, now run by the third generation. Here is a link to their website. http://www.cumberlandfoundry.com/

 

gvasale

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Re: A new Seth Thomas street clock weigh, and fitting the original pulley to it.

Yeah...but do you think any Irish were offended?:rolleyes:
 

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