A few Dial Clocks to share

novicetimekeeper

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I have one railway clock, it is a rarity being rear wind and set. I would like a L&SWR/Southern Railway one as my Grandad worked for them, and they have the best provenance, but they are very expensive.
 
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rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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Seen a few American Dial clocks over the years which mostly had beautifully decorated cases like Tonbridge Ware . I think clock makers bought the movements in and the cases also and put them together and put their names on them .Like your American fusees and this Maltese case looks top quality .
Yes. They're "AngloAmerican" clocks in the collector's parlance. Cases may be inlaid, decorated papier mache with MOP decoration, wood, etc. Quite a variety. The movements are typically more standard non-fusee brass spring driven products by a # of American makers (e.g., Jerome, E.N. Welch). The Jeromes with his integral fusee movements are much less often encountered

I have also seen those in the style of dial clocks with German movements.

In fact, Jerome produced a number of models of fusee clocks in the middle of the 19th Century, including shelf models. These are also illustrated in the above posted circular. The New Haven Clock Co., which descended from Jerome's original firm, inexplicably and very briefly produced several models of shelf clocks containing movements with integral fusees in the 1880's, long after most US firms stopped making them. The movements installed in these clocks are similar but not identical to those in the earlier clocks I have posted here.

Generally speaking, the fusees in the mass-produced mid 19th century American clocks were NOT set up properly to serve their intended purpose. It's my belief that the intention was to convert weight driven movements into spring driven ones without too much fuss so that they could be accommodated into a smaller case. For more about these clocks and many examples, see this on the Forums:

Post your favorite American fusee clock. | NAWCC Forums

The cases of the American fusee clocks I posted are rather nice. Florence Kroeber was a German immigrant clock maker in Lower Manhattan. Through much of the 19th Century, Lower Manhattan, NYC was home to firms engaged in furniture making, frame making and related trades. There were also firms there which called themselves clock makers but were more assemblers, sometimes making the case, using movements and other components "imported" from CT. Sometimes, just relabeling a complete clock. Kroeber was basically one of these. IMHO, however, the quality of many of his cases could be the best and at times, quite unique. He generally used the movements of others, e.g., Seth Thomas.

There is a thread devoted to Kroeber on the Forums:

Post your Kroeber Clocks Here | NAWCC Forums

Worth a look!

And sorry for this thread hijacking. I have a tendency to do that.

RM
 

bwclock

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Seen a few American Dial clocks over the years which mostly had beautifully decorated cases like Tonbridge Ware . I think clock makers bought the movements in and the cases also and put them together and put their names on them .Like your American fusees and this Maltese case looks top quality .
When I hear the words "dial clock" I think of English fusee ones. Attached are photos of a few fusee dial clock which are languishing around my shop. These are more modern ones than many of the nice ones that other individuals have posted in this thread. Alas, older dial clocks do not seem to show up in the western USA.
Nick mentioned using the space over the door. Apparently this location works for me also.

The Walker clock in the third photo is a miniature, having a dial just under 8". The one-piece carved one in the last photo sits above my computer desk and is the one I look up at to tell the time. Imagine that, using a clock to tell time rather than as a decoration! It is a good timekeeper, perhaps due to the long pendulum.
Bruce

IMG_5666.jpg IMG_5668.jpg IMG_5669.jpg IMG_5670.jpg
 

novicetimekeeper

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That's lovely, and I do like a verge movement on a dial clock. Nice hands too.
 

Ralph

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Bruce, I wish you were right, but this one came from a well known dealer in Massachusetts. My area? For the most part, a horological wasteland. Lol

Cheers, Ralph
 

novicetimekeeper

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Bruce, I wish you were right, but this one came from a well known dealer in Massachusetts. My area? For the most part, a horological wasteland. Lol

Cheers, Ralph
You do get hold of some very nice clocks!
 

Chris Radano

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That is interesting. There must have been a special order for that. Well that is why we like dial clocks (and other clocks too). They are not only interesting, but you don't see the attention spent or the quality put into most things nowadays.
 
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Philip Snowden

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That is interesting. There must have been a special order for that. Well that is why we like dial clocks (and other clocks too). They are not only interesting, but you don't see the attention spent or the quality put into most things nowadays.
Yes exactly people who have come in here over the years say they all the same but we know different.Who would have thought when you started this thread that so many lovely Dial clocks would have been put on here .Hope more arrive for us to look at.
 

Philip Snowden

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Lovely clock!

Here's 2 American papier mache "gallery" clocks both by the Litchfield Mfg. Co. Rather rare form for an American clock of this style:

View attachment 581415

The larger one is a rather rare size. It has a less commonly seen time and strike version of the LMC's marine movement with a Sully type of escapement. Here's a better pic:

View attachment 581416

No, that one ain't fitting over most doors, either.

The smaller one on it's right has the more typically found time only movement:

View attachment 581417

Both of these clocks are discussed in more depth in the "Marine" clock thread.

LMC employed immigrant English papier mache makers so a definite connection with English papier mache objects and clocks.

How about a papier mache chair in which to sit and look at your clock?

View attachment 581422

Sorry for the overall hijack!

RM
Sit on the chair to look at the clocks and have a glass of Red on a papier mache table .

A1CCAD47-8014-4F55-9101-243670682F0C.png
 

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