A bidding accident

Discussion in 'Your Newest Clock Acquisition' started by Bruce Barnes, Jun 25, 2018.

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  1. Bruce Barnes

    Bruce Barnes Registered User

    Mar 20, 2004
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    Here is a case of pushing the wrong button and having the winning bid.Not my "cup of tea" but nice anyway.
    It was listed as a French Carriage clock,I would surmise that as correct except it is only 5 1/4 inches tall,so maybe correctly a miniature?
    It was listed as non working but wound it up and away we went.
    The manufacturer I believe is Duverday and Bloequel with a lion rapant logo.
    It weighs a ton for a small clock and all the glass has the green copper caste and all are beveled.
    Was this a good company and maker of quality instruments?
    Thanks,
    Bruce

    french 1.jpg french 2.jpg
     
  2. zedric

    zedric Registered User

    Aug 8, 2012
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    As always, more photos of the movement, or even the full clock showing the handle, would help, but I would guess that it will be a fairly run-of-the-mill timepiece (ie no bell) clock from, say around 1890 or even into the early 1900s. The size, at 5 1/4 inches high, puts it squarely in the "normal size" bracket, and it certainly is not a miniature.

    Duverdry and Bloequel are a well known and respected maker, but the clocks they made were generally for the mass-market, so don't hold as much appeal for collectors. However, the fact that there is a makers mark on the clock at all would help if you wanted to re-sell it.

    If you were to clean up the brass case, it would look a lot nicer.
     
  3. JTD

    JTD Registered User

    Sep 27, 2005
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    I agree wholeheartedly with everything zedric has said.

    Just for the record, both of you have written the name of the maker differently but neither was correct! It should be Duverdrey & Bloquel.

    JTD
     
  4. Bruce Barnes

    Bruce Barnes Registered User

    Mar 20, 2004
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    Thanks for all the information much appreciated but still a little confused. If.as you say Zedric, that 5 1/4 is the normal size then how do you title the 7+ inch clocks and is the term "boudoir clock" incorrect?
    Bruce
     
  5. zedric

    zedric Registered User

    Aug 8, 2012
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    Hi Bruce

    Take a look at the display case I put together for some of my collection, which is shown in this thread..
    Your Favourite Clock

    The third shelf down houses most of my miniatures, with one "standard size" clock in the middle for comparison. The miniatures are generally less than 3.5" high. The rest of the clocks, ranging up to the one on the far right top, are within what is called "standard" size, although the one at the far right top (made by JB Beguin) is very close to being a "giant", being over 7" high without the handle.

    The term "boudoir" clock doesn't really have a close definition - it is used for a clock that could have been used on a bedside table or the like, so something small and usually something fancy.
     
  6. Bruce Barnes

    Bruce Barnes Registered User

    Mar 20, 2004
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    What a stunning collection and now I have gained some knowledge......................I may "pick your brain" when I dis-assemble.
    Many thanks,
    Bruce
     
  7. zedric

    zedric Registered User

    Aug 8, 2012
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    Glad to be of assistance, although I'm more of a collector than repairer at the moment - plenty of projects here for when I eventually retire...

    just for fun, here is another picture of some of the miniatures - the one on the left is a miniature gorge cased clock (no maker name known currently) the one in the middle is a miniature oval with alarm by A. Dumas, and the one on the right is a miniature corniche cased clock by Margaine. The two clocks at the back are by Bourdin (with seconds and alarm) and by Drocourt (with gilt dial mask). The three front clocks would date to around the 1880s and the two back ones are mid 1860s.
    IMG_2170.JPG
     
  8. jmclaugh

    jmclaugh Registered User

    Jun 1, 2006
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    #8 jmclaugh, Jun 27, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2018
    Allix in his book Carriage Clocks divides these clocks into three size classes, minatures, full-size and giants. The standard or conventional sizes (all handle up) he lists for them are; minatures 3.75", 4" and 4.25"; full size 5.5", 6", 6.5" and 7"; giant 9".
    However that doesn't mean they were the only sizes used especially by the likes of D&B who were one of the largest makers of mass produced carriage clocks, Allix cites a D&B catalogue from 1910 that shows a large array of different styles and sizes some of which are peculiar to them.

    This clock looks to be what is termed an Obis, it was produced in large numbers and was the least expensive type of case, standard size 5.5".
     
  9. Bruce Barnes

    Bruce Barnes Registered User

    Mar 20, 2004
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    Thanks to you both,another segment of this hobby that has much to offer and a source of learning.
    Maybe I lucked out, for an inexpensive model (5.5 inches) it is very well designed,and tho small, very heavy and for one that was listed as "not running" it is ticking away and has lost one minute in 5 days.
     

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