89c question

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by waricks, Aug 23, 2011.

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  1. waricks

    waricks Registered User

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    Hello - I have a 1914 ST Adamantine with an 89c in it. I love the clock sound and everything about it. I am trying to figure out how to adjust the fast/slow setting so that it will keep good time - it seems to lose about 6 minutes between windings. (sunday to sunday) which direction to I turn this adjustment key?

    While I am at it there are a few chips in the adamantine that I would like to at least make look better. I am sure there is no way to restore these but what do you recommend that I use to help hide them?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    #2 Steven Thornberry, Aug 23, 2011
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2011
    There should be on the dial near the speed regulator arbor the letters S and F (slow and fast). Turn the small end of key in the appropriate direction (toward the F, in this case) to speed it up. Since you wind it once a week, losing 6 minutes over that period might not be so bad; clocks will tend to run slower as the spring unwinds and loses some of its power. How does it run after you wind it? However, if this loss of 6 minutes is a recent development, perhaps it is time for a complete servicing of the movement. When was it last cleaned, bushed, etc.?

    BTW, if the dial is not marked with S and F, try turning the key to the right for faster. That's how my adamantine is set up.
     
  3. Jeremy Woodoff

    Jeremy Woodoff Registered User
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    Regarding the adamantine, if you remove a part of the case (generally by unscrewing from the inside), you will expose adamantine that is normally not visible because it extends behind the piece removed. You can use this as a source for "veneer" to repair the damage.
     
  4. waricks

    waricks Registered User

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    Thanks - I will try that and see what happens. I have only had the clock for a couple of months. From the looks of the movement it does not look to be really bad. It is a bit dirty and so I may not be able to see what the damage may be. I would love to have it cleaned and bushed if needed but it will have to wait. Maybe I should not run it to keep it from having further damage. Would love to do it myself but I have zero experience doing a cleaning or anything else.
    -> posts merged by system <-
    That is a very good idea - never thought about that. thanks!
     
  5. lpbp

    lpbp Registered User
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    Adamantine can become very brittle, (probably why it has chips,) making cutting pieces off difficult. Depending on the color filling with enamel paint sometimes will disguise it enough, then polish it out to blend in.
     
  6. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    You won't hurt it to run it. A full service will correct the existing problems, and if they get a bit worse over time it will still fix them. At this point, enjoy the clock until it stops, then have it repaired. After that, regular maintenance will keep it going strong.
     
  7. lpbp

    lpbp Registered User
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    I am not a fan of running it until it stops if it needs apparent service, I have had a couple of clocks in, not too many, where the wear was so great it allowed the adjacent wheel to slip and strip out teeth. The only movements I recommend, running them until they stop, are Hermles, then replace them, with new ones.
     
  8. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Ideally, sure. But we get clocks like this all the time that have been run until they stop. Not often damaging to the gears - just need lots of bushings :)
     
  9. lpbp

    lpbp Registered User
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    I have also gotten some that the pivots themselves have been grooved, by running in dirt too long. Sometimes caused by someone re-oiling dirty clocks, and producing an abrasive action, I still say not to run a clock that you don't know the history of repair.
     
  10. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Yep. No argument here. I've replace a fair amount of pivots too :)
     

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