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#6 regulator with mods

John MacArthur

NAWCC Member
Feb 13, 2007
418
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laplaza.org
I have now gotten to halfway on my #6 regulator movement and thought I'd show some of the changes I've made. For starters, this clock will not have mercury compensation, but a heat treated Invar rod with a Strasser style bob. This will make it easier to adjust the compensation, as well as reduce the time lag for full compensation that occurs with the mercury bob. Anyway, I've depleted my stash of mercury and it's very expensive, if at all possible, to get now.
DSCN1387a.jpg
In addition I've made the pallets from tungsten carbide instead of sapphire. The sapphire has the problem of the sharp edge at the end of the impulse plane chipping off in very small pieces, and the carbide will not do that. This is somewhat experimental, as I'm not sure about the oil retaining property of the carbide as compared to sapphire.
DSCN1379a.jpg
I have used shielded miniature ball bearings on the barrel arbor, in the weight pulley, and at the front of the center arbor. This should substantially reduce train friction. I've added a counterweight to the cannon pinion that holds the minute hand to remove any cyclical timekeeping errors that not having this might cause.
DSCN1382a.jpg
I have included jewels at the back of the center arbor and both ends of the third wheel. My thought is to reduce train friction as much a possible in this movement.. The other minor modification has been to make the third wheel arbor in the German style with the wheel toward the front plate instead of behind the center wheel. This makes for a slightly more compact movement.
DSCN1364a.jpg
This movement is somewhat experimental at this stage and I'm working rather more slowly on it, but it is nearly ready to set on a test stand and see how much power it needs and how well the pendulum compensation works.

Johnny
 
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Ralph

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Jan 22, 2002
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John, do you consider end stops in your quest for reducing friction?

You do beautiful work.

Ralph
 

John MacArthur

NAWCC Member
Feb 13, 2007
418
51
28
laplaza.org
Thank you Ralph - I have considered endstops a number of times; I would expect that they would probably do as much good as full jeweling. I also suspect that the jewels impart much less friction on the pivot shoulders than the brass of a simple plate hole, which is the point of endstops. I'm hoping also that the ball bearings will have a significant impact. I can't imagine a way to quantify all of these separately though. One thing at a time. I will get this movement up and running before I commence all the finish work, so I'll have some idea fairly soon. I'm anxious to see how the pendulum behaves, too.
Johnny
 

tok-tokkie

Registered User
Nov 25, 2010
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Lovely work.
The ball bearings; do they have at least ceramic balls if not all ceramic bearings? Running all stainless bearings has resulted in fretting between the balls & races on some clocks.
 

John MacArthur

NAWCC Member
Feb 13, 2007
418
51
28
laplaza.org
Thank you Tok - these are not ceramic bearings - in an initial search I was only able to find the size I wanted in stainless. I may search a little harder for ceramic ones; I agree that they are considered superior. These are designed to run at high speeds with very small loads; in my application they are just the opposite: very low speeds and quite a bit higher load than they are engineered for. We'll see what happens, as this movement is, as I say, experimental..
Johnny
 

tok-tokkie

Registered User
Nov 25, 2010
341
8
18
Cape Town, South Africa
Country
All stainless are fine for proof of concept. I used Boca Bearings in California. They have an excellent on-line catalogue which can be filtered to the size you are looking for.
 

John MacArthur

NAWCC Member
Feb 13, 2007
418
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laplaza.org
Thanks Tok - I had ordered the stainless bearings from them. They do have small ceramic ones also at ~40x the price. As you say, I can replace them if everything goes well. If I decide to do that, I'd need to determine if they have those in shielded as opposed to sealed style.
Johnny
 

tok-tokkie

Registered User
Nov 25, 2010
341
8
18
Cape Town, South Africa
Country
I got ones with ceramic balls in stainless races from them. Except the main escape wheel bearing which is all ceramic.

One tip I will give. I got shielded bearings. To get the grease out I found soaking them in engine de-greaser then spearing them on a round needle file & spinning under running tap was far more effective than soaking them in acetone or benzin. Did it a few times to make absolutely sure.
 

John MacArthur

NAWCC Member
Feb 13, 2007
418
51
28
laplaza.org
Great tip Tok, thank you. I checked the prices, and they are not 40x the stainless ones, more like 20x. I assume the hybrid ones would be even more reasonable. I will undoubtedly switch to those after I do some initial runs.
Johnny
 

John MacArthur

NAWCC Member
Feb 13, 2007
418
51
28
laplaza.org
I have taken your advice Tok, and ordered hybrid bearings. I was not aware of their availability at actually reasonable prices; 2x the stainless ones. Good tip, thank you, and I will de-grease them as you suggest..
Johnny
 

John MacArthur

NAWCC Member
Feb 13, 2007
418
51
28
laplaza.org
Update on #6. I have recently taken a deposit on this clock, and so have proceeded to bring it to final finish. I am in the process of making the movement screws and nuts, finishing the mount bracket and pendulum details, and will be starting on the dial soon.
Movement 1.JPG

Johnny
 
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Christopher Doehlert

NAWCC Member
Jun 18, 2019
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Very nice work.

How did you machine the tungsten carbide? I acquire some for the weight for a clock project of mine but was led to believe that it wouldn't be practical to drill and tap for a hanging hook.
 

John MacArthur

NAWCC Member
Feb 13, 2007
418
51
28
laplaza.org
Hi Christopher - the tungsten carbide pallets were formed with lapidary techniques. I made them from an old lathe tool insert. I cut the blanks with a diamond saw, and formed the faces with diamond laps. Drilling might be possible with diamond drills, but tapping would be nearly impossible. You might have to braze a hook on to your chunk. Metallic tungsten might be machinable; I've never had any to try on.
Johnny
 

Christopher Doehlert

NAWCC Member
Jun 18, 2019
6
0
1
Hi Christopher - the tungsten carbide pallets were formed with lapidary techniques. I made them from an old lathe tool insert. I cut the blanks with a diamond saw, and formed the faces with diamond laps. Drilling might be possible with diamond drills, but tapping would be nearly impossible. You might have to braze a hook on to your chunk. Metallic tungsten might be machinable; I've never had any to try on.
Johnny
That's consistent with what I learned and your're right. How did you make the hole for the arbor - also diamond grinding bit of some sort?
 

Christopher Doehlert

NAWCC Member
Jun 18, 2019
6
0
1
Johnny, thanks for the detail. I was getting quite envious of a piece of tungsten carbide with all that geometry!

Again, beautiful work.
 

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