6 jaw bezel chuck to fit a Sherline and/or a Levin

oldetymes

Registered User
Feb 5, 2007
35
0
6
Hi folks - anyone know of a source to purchase a 6 jaw bezel chuck to fit my Sherline and/or my Levin lathes. This for use in holding clock wheels for repair, etc.

thx.Dave @ OldeTymes
 

Jerry Kieffer

NAWCC Fellow
NAWCC Member
May 31, 2005
2,926
546
113
wisconsin
Country
Dave
Since both lathes have standard collet capabilities, they of course show up used on E-bay with collet arbors. Any of the regular Watch and Clock used tool dealers will probable have several to pick from at any one time. However one of the least expensive and very accurate options would be to purchase a Sherline self centering four jaw Chuck with factory installed steel soft jaws. This allows you to machine the most common size steps/custom steps required for the work that you do. A WW arbor can be supplied for this chuck for use on your Levin Lathe if it has a WW/8MM spindle. I have a couple of six jaw chucks supplied with stepped jaws, but find machineable jaws to be more accurate and more secure as well as causing less work holding scares.

Jerry Kieffer
 

Richmccarty

Registered User
Sep 3, 2007
230
3
0
What are you hoping to use the 6-jaw for? I've had very good luck using a MDF faceplate on the lathe for boring the center of wheels or holding a French barrel for rebushing. Mount a thick piece of MDF to a faceplate and then turn a recess into the wheel JUST fits. It will hold tight enough if you turn carefully. If you turn the recess fresh every time you remount the faceplate, you should be able to get near perfect centers.

Rich McCarty, GradBHI & West Dean College
http://www,restoredclocks.com
 

Old Codger

Registered User
Aug 10, 2007
66
0
0
Richmccarty said:
What are you hoping to use the 6-jaw for? I've had very good luck using a MDF faceplate on the lathe for boring the center of wheels or holding a French barrel for rebushing. Mount a thick piece of MDF to a faceplate and then turn a recess into the wheel JUST fits. It will hold tight enough if you turn carefully. If you turn the recess fresh every time you remount the faceplate, you should be able to get near perfect centers.

Rich McCarty, GradBHI & West Dean College
http://www,restoredclocks.com
I am 100% in agreament with Rich, think about it!! A wheel has machined teeth on its outside edge, these machined surfaces are made to close tolerances, i wont go into the theory of the likes of cycloidal curves etc but why risk any form of damage by using a chuck with hardened steel jaws. Its an easy job to make a wood chuck as Rich says, regards OC
 
H

Hardy

Hi Dave,

I think you have been given some good advice regarding the MDF for holding wheels. I suspect you would be disappointed with a bezel chuck for this purpose; they are meant for holding bezels and other case parts which have a sharpish edge and these chucks would likely damage the teeth on wheels. There is a fair slope on the working surfaces of the chuck jaws and this could burr or bend the wheel teeth. A good bezel chuck will hold both externally and internally and has a relief for the case joint.
You do want to spread the load around the wheel teeth as much as you can, however, and I suggest you look for wheel chucks which are much cheaper and work like regular collets.

Hardy
 

Jerry Kieffer

NAWCC Fellow
NAWCC Member
May 31, 2005
2,926
546
113
wisconsin
Country
Rich, OC, Hardy
I normally state my suggestion and leave it at that. However in this case because beginners may use these methods, I feel the need to comment further. It has always been my personal feeling that mounting anything in a lathe by friction fit was an unsound practice for a couple of reasons. The first one is personal safety when the part comes flying out of the holder. I say when because sooner or later it will. The second reason is part damage from coming out or catching a lathe tool causing untold damage because it is not securely held. Holding small easily replaced parts from a common $50.00 works or whatever is one thing but not securely holding valuable parts is a unwise practice. I have repaired and reproduced a number of parts that have been damaged/destroyed over the years by the use of unsound holding practices.
The most recent one awhile back was a very complicated gear from a valuable instrument that lost ten teeth when it hit the floor at a high rate of speed. Unfortunately for the person who was reparing it, the tooth form was unusual and a cutter had to be made to form the teeth in the repaired section. The cost of repair far exceeded the $120.00 or so it would have taken to purchase a Chuck with machinable soft jaws. The use of such a chuck allows perfect jaw fit to a repair part eliminating part damage while properly and safely securing the part. Anyone using unsound work holding practice`s in a large or small Lathe should thoroughly understand the consequences.

Jerry Kieffer
 

Forum statistics

Threads
164,923
Messages
1,435,154
Members
85,879
Latest member
deeqdacad
Encyclopedia Pages
1,101
Total wiki contributions
2,872
Last edit
Rockford's early high grade movements by Greg Frauenhoff