5 Tube Herschede 2 weight

R&A

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Oct 21, 2008
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Can anybody provide some pictures and information. Regarding this type of movement. And how rare this clock is:???:

Thank You

H/C
 
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shutterbug

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Hmmm. Two weight .... Never even heard of one. I'd be interested in seeing it too. Where'd you see/hear about it?
 

shutterbug

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Hmmm. Strikes on the right side. Interesting! Requires the whole barrel to move back and forth then, I assume. Lever on left is for that purpose?
 

LaBounty

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Hey Shutt-

Yes, the whole pin barrel moves back and forth. There is a spiral grooved cam to the left of the barrel which guides a pin on the barrel into a slot. The amount of time the barrel stays on the cam determines the number of strikes. This cam would be correctly called the snail.

As you suspect, the chime pin barrel is moved to the right at the hour via the lever on the left and this moves the pin out of the slot, onto the snail. There are normally alignment marks on the outer snail housing and the inner gear which are both visible in the half-moon cutout. Aligning these marks with the snail pin in the slot should guarantee proper strike count.

Pretty ingenious strike arrangement :).
 

R&A

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Ok so how rare are these movements :???: And did they come with a wood neck or a chrome neck:???: I believe the bob is 8'' , but then again I haven't seen it yet..

H/C
 

Willie X

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HC,

IMO, this is one of their least successful movements. Probably an effort in cost cutting. First thing I would check for is die cast (zinc ?) cable drums. If they are good fine. If they are cracked, run like th wind! No shame in bowing out on what will likely be an effort in futility ...

Just my 2, Willie X
 

Mike Phelan

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Shame they are unpopular as it's such an interesting and clever design, having no count wheel nor rack.

I borrowed a book about these, written by Steven Conover.

The lever on the left is to return pin the barrel to the right, after the hour strike, so the pin clears the spiral groove and returns to its starting point at the start of the spiral, ready for 1/4 past.
 
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R&A

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I have a customer that has found one. And he, not having any knowledge of clocks. It is more difficult to explain in terms that he can understand. So I came in here because I have never seen one and nor worked on one. Very interesting indeed and some what complicated. I guess that not all designs to safe money are beneficial. But all and all, very clever.

H/C
 

tlr6969

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Well, I just picked up a clock with one of these Herschede movements. I appears the winding arbors are brass and not zink? The movement keeps time and strikes ok, but I need to set the hammers to the bells better. I do have a few questions, maybe someone can help? 3 of the 5 tubes are suspended by a waxy string that looks like a cat gut violin string, the other 2 have just regular string.

1. I am going to replace the tube hanging strings, what should I use?
2. When I rehang the tubes, how far down from the top of the tube should the hammer strike it?
3. When the hammer is at rest, what distance should it be from the tube.

any thoughts would be greatly appreciated

View attachment 319737 View attachment 319738 View attachment 319739
 

R&A

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I use braided nylon for the tubes. As far as where the hammer hits. I have one that hits about 3/8 of an inch from the top after it hung. The distance the tube is from the hammer is determined by the sound. Adjusting the tube in and out from the hammer. Plus the spring tension on the bottom of the hammer spring . Is adjusted for the strength of the hammer to hit the tube. Allot of guys think that that is how to adjust the hammer hitting the spring . But its for the strength of the hit. If you get to doing it. You will see what determines what. Nice clock by the way
 

tlr6969

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Thanks for the info, I will start to play with it this weekend. It appears to be in fairly good shape for 100 years old.
 

Willie X

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They are interesting but also tricky to make right. It's best to leave the spring tensioners alone and hope no one has mis adjusted them. Most tubes sound best if struck on the very edge, just like a bell. The hammer leather can be half on and half off the edge of the tube but I usually set the tube so that the leather is about 3/4 on the tube. This way the leathers will last longer. Stalling problems can often be traced to wear or someone messing with the hammer spring screws. All Herschede clocks are very robust in there construction and for this reason they requite a lot of power to operate. It's easy to be fooled into thinking that all that power would make for a strong running chiming action that would stop at nothing ... IMOE nothing could be further from the truth. They will run dependably for many years but it doesn't take much of a problem to make one stop. They need to be serviced regularly and the trains unloaded as much as practicaly posible.
 
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shutterbug

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You're only backlogged 14 months?
More time on the bench and less time on the couch, Tea! :D
 

gleber

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The distance the tube is from the hammer is determined by the sound
Do you mean the sound is determined by the distance from the hammer? I' m confused by the wording.

I imagine the sound depends on several factors:
  • The distance from the hammer (at rest) to the tube
  • The location on the tube where the hammer hits
  • The preload on the spring adjusters
  • The quality/condition/thickness/hardness of the hammer leathers
  • Any slack in the hammer strings (at rest)
Most tubes sound best if struck on the very edge, just like a bell.
Thanks for that tip.

Tom
 

shutterbug

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Good work! Too bad you have to give it back :D
 

mlschlot

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Just ran into my first #5 movement today. I spent two hours just studying the front of the movement and haven't figured out squat so far. It's most definitely an ingenious movement design. I found a couple of kluge repairs in the chime/strike lever set that I suspect are much of my problem, but I've got a lot of reading to do before I tear into this. The "snail" groove arrangement on the end of the chime cylinder is enough to make your head explode watching it. It reminds me of some music box chime cylinders I've worked on that shift the barrel to line up a different set of pins to play an entire symphony rather than just a snippet of the music on a single cylinder. There's an excellent article in the October 1996 "Bulletin" (Vol. 98, Issue 304, page 634) "The Odd-Ball Herschede Tubular Bell Clock" by Stephen H. Rogers (NJ).
 
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