3-D Model of Notre Dame Cathedral Clock, Paris

Discussion in 'Tower, Monumental & Street Clocks' started by Bill Ward, Apr 17, 2020.

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  1. Bill Ward

    Bill Ward Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Jan 8, 2003
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    #1 Bill Ward, Apr 17, 2020
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2020
    I have posted here the announcement of the public release of this 3-D model of the clock of Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, on the anniversary of the fire which badly damaged both the clock and the cathedral:

    Hello,
    One year ago, on April 15, 2019, the Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris
    caught fire and precious items of our cultural heritage vanished:
    the historical roof frame, Viollet-le-Duc's spire, but also the Collin clock
    which was located near the base of the spire.

    Today, I have the pleasure of announcing the first complete digital 3D model
    of that clock, of which a few views are shown in

    Modélisation 3D de l'horloge de Notre-Dame

    (The site is currently only in French.)

    This is a structural model and not a 3D scan. Using many photographs
    and measurements, I have painstakingly reconstructed hundreds of parts
    in order to create an absolutely unique work. This model is a scientific
    and volunteer work, made outside of the scope of my University.

    I would now like to make this work accessible to others. Those who
    would like to have a (free) copy are requested to let me know at the address
    horlogeXparisXnotreXdame@gmail.com (remove the X's, please).

    I especially set up this address to communicate about this work,
    please do not use another address of mine for the same topic.

    Do not hesitate to inform others around you about this work,
    especially clockmakers, CAD connoisseurs and heritage curators.
    This work is, to my knowledge, unique in the world. Although
    other tower clocks have been modeled, and although some of them are certainly
    more sophisticated than mine, these models have not been made available to all.
    The 3D model for the Strasbourg astronomical clock, for instance,
    is fiercely guarded. Those made by F. Simon-Fustier are only available
    as video excerpts or simplified and limited versions. For the others,
    one often only can obtain a few screenshots. Here, for the first time,
    anyone interested will be able to have much more and will have the means
    to go far beyond anything that has ever done in that field.

    But this is above all a model useful for the post-fire forensic analysis.
    The documentary shown yesterday on France 2 Channel (« Sauver Notre-Dame »)
    illustrates the need to study and organize the debris of the clock
    (see here Sauver Notre-Dame for a replay).
    (N.B. This TV broadcast is apparently not licensed in the US, and won't play here. BW)

    I am looking to hear from you! In the meantime, I am doing some finetuning
    and polishing the documentation of this work
    (which will be in French, at least for the time being).

    Denis Roegel
    Associate Professor, University of Lorraine, France
    (but note that this is a private message, not endorsed by any employer!)
     
    scootermcrad likes this.
  2. scootermcrad

    scootermcrad Registered User
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    #2 scootermcrad, Apr 18, 2020
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2020
    Hello Denis,
    Thank you very much for informing us. I would definitely like more information. I will reach out to you by email.
    Scott
     
  3. Bill Ward

    Bill Ward Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Jan 8, 2003
    1,227
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    EE (spec. acoustics) now medicine
    USA
    Hello,

    A few days ago, I made the announcement of my 3D reconstruction of the
    1867 Collin clock destroyed in the fire of the Notre-Dame cathedral in Paris.
    I received many requests and messages from interested people, and given
    their number, I decided to make my 3D model freely available on the web.
    You will thus find how to access it on the already mentioned site,
    namely

    Modélisation 3D de l'horloge de Notre-Dame

    Please note that there are many files to download via github.
    There are also several PDF files, mostly in French, but with a README
    in English.

    If you download my model and if you want to exploit it in your computer
    environment, you will have to have suitable software and also some
    knowledge in CAD. I will not be able to answer technical questions
    pertaining this or that software, since I am not familiar with most
    of these software. You will therefore have to find answers on the web
    (for instance: how do I import a STEP file in Rhino? or how to translate
    an object in 3Dsmax? how to add color to a object in Autodesk Inventor? etc.),
    or ask other experts in order to use the files I have provided.

    In the future, I will once in a while provide updates and they
    will be put at the same place as the initial distribution.

    Please feel free to comment here about this effort.

    In the meantime, I would of course be happy to receive remarks or questions
    related to my model (for instance: why is this part like this,
    why haven't you done this or that, etc.), and of course corrections
    or notifications of errors or missing parts. But in the sequel,
    these questions would benefit from being sent on a message board.
    Also, note that I may not be able to answer all requests sent by mail.

    Finally, I am also contemplating an archive for the contributions of
    other people. I could add contributions on github, but perhaps
    there are ways to have an even more general archive?
    All sorts of contributions can be thought of, the simplest ones
    being procedures to integrate my model in various commercial
    or non commercial software. Other contributions might consist in
    improvements on certain parts, or new creations, partial or complete
    animations, models of other mechanisms, and even models of other clocks.
    All the contributions on 3D printing, in plastic or metal, on cutting,
    on the use of tools, etc., are of course also welcome.
    General information on other clocks would also be useful.

    Denis Roegel
     
  4. Bill Ward

    Bill Ward Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Jan 8, 2003
    1,227
    8
    38
    EE (spec. acoustics) now medicine
    USA
    I've posted here, from Denis Roegel, further information about the Notre Dame Tower Clock computer model.
    Bill Ward

    Hello,

    A few days ago, I made the announcement of my 3D reconstruction of the
    1867 Collin clock destroyed in the fire of the Notre-Dame cathedral in Paris.
    I received many requests and messages from interested people, and given
    their number, I decided to put my 3D model freely available on the web.
    You will thus find how to access it on the already mentioned site,
    namely

    Modélisation 3D de l'horloge de Notre-Dame

    Please note that there are many files to download via github.
    There are also several PDF files, mostly in French, but with a README
    in English.

    If you download my model and if you want to exploit it in your computer
    environment, you will have to have suitable software and also some
    knowledge in CAD. I will not be able to answer technical questions
    pertaining this or that software, since I am not familiar with most
    of these software. You will therefore have to find answers on the web
    (for instance: how do I import a STEP file in Rhino? or how to translate
    an object in 3Dsmax? how to add color to a object in Autodesk Inventor? etc.),
    or ask other experts in order to use the files I have provided.

    In the future, I will once in a while provide updates and they
    will be put at the same place as the initial distribution.

    I would also like to set up a message board around this project
    and I would like it to be public (so that everyone can access and see it,
    even when not subscribed), easy to use and to search.
    This does exclude Facebook and in particular private groups on Facebook.
    Does anybody have a suggestion? The NAWCC might be a solution,
    but can anybody write there or do you need to be a member of NAWCC?

    In the meantime, I would of course be happy to receive remarks or questions
    related to my model (for instance: why is this part like this,
    why haven't you done this or that, etc.), and of course corrections
    or notifications of errors or missing parts. But in the sequel,
    these questions would benefit from being sent on a message board.
    Also, note that I may not be able to answer all requests sent by mail.

    Finally, I am also contemplating an archive for the contributions of
    other people. I could add contributions on github, but perhaps
    there are ways to have an even more general archive?
    All sorts of contributions can be thought of, the simplest ones
    being procedures to integrate my model in various commercial
    or non commercial software. Other contributions might consist in
    improvements on certain parts, or new creations, partial or complete
    animations, models of other mechanisms, and even models of other clocks.
    All the contributions on 3D printing, in plastic or metal, on cutting,
    on the use of tools, etc., are of course also welcome.
    General informations on other clocks would also be useful.

    Denis Roegel
     
  5. scootermcrad

    scootermcrad Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    Mar 1, 2016
    292
    29
    28
    North Carolina
    Country Flag:
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    I wanted to respond to this and say that I have downloaded Denis' files and they are fantastic. He has done an incredible job modeling this clock and is really striving to constantly improve the model and make it usable for others. The downloads are large, but if you're using an appropriate CAD package to open the files the sizes will probably seem pretty normal.

    Hopefully these efforts are put to good use to recreate this clock.

    Well done and thank you to Denis. I'm behind on the newest downloads, but plan to get back on them soon.
     

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