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American 24 hr clock identification

JNasse

New Member
Oct 27, 2020
1
0
1
45
Country
Hello Everyone,

My wife pick-up a 24-hour electric clock at a local flea market, and we are trying to identify the Maker, and restore to a working clock. It came without a cabinet and very few markings. There is a hand engraved marking that says "A 8-26-33" on the top brass plate and Hart and Hegeman MFG CO on what I think is driving the clock motion. I have attached several pictures of the clock and markings for everyone. I appreciate any information that you may have.

Thank you in advance!

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Peter

Registered User
Jan 28, 2010
209
1
18
Bethlehem, Rural NW CT
Region
Hart & Hegeman, located in Hartford CT, became Arrow, Hart & Hegeman in 1927, later became part of Cooper Industries. They were manufacturers of electrical switches and controls, and the brand still exists. Could be a general purpose time switch for lighting, traffic signals or whatever. Probably had a metal case or was mounted directly in an enclosure with the wiring and other controls. A nice piece of early electrical apparatus.
The piece with the chrome top and the white ceramic base is the switch.

-Pete
 
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Toughtool

Registered User
Aug 12, 2016
220
34
28
Panama City, FL
Country
The piece with the chrome top and the white ceramic base is the switch.
I would have thought the chrome top and white ceramic base was the drive motor, not the switch. It looks to me that the switch is here (photo). Clearly it is a contact set mounted to something insulated and movable, with wires going to its base.

However, it is marked like a switch. i.e. 5A @ 250 V, 10A @ 125 V. If it is a switch, where is the energy to run the gears from?

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Peter

Registered User
Jan 28, 2010
209
1
18
Bethlehem, Rural NW CT
Region
There was a similar switch with a knob on it in the cellar ofmy grandparents house (1892), relatively common with knob and tube wiring. There is a grey tin cylinder near the center of the second photo that could be an encased spring. There is a hole centered directly below it that could have been for a wind motor and the device which you pointed to (which does appear to be a switch) could have controlled the wind motor. Following along the train, I see an escape wheel and what looks like the support for a hairspring (missing).

-Pete