American PW 1948 Hamilton RWS 992b

Discussion in 'Watch Repair' started by Puckerbrush, Feb 19, 2017.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. Puckerbrush

    Puckerbrush Registered User

    Dec 8, 2008
    11
    0
    0
    Finally found a 992b and had it serviced at the end of October 2016. I would like to get some opinions from some of you as to it's consistency. I wear it as an everyday watch.
    Here is 24 hour, 15 day example (each morning) of the time while using it each day:17 seconds slow, 23 ss, 18 ss, 12 ss, 12 ss, 9 ss, 5 ss, 6 ss, 16 ss, 20 ss, 16 ss, 11 ss, 8 ss, 8 ss, 6 ss. On the average it's pretty good aside from the cyclic gain/loss.
    Here now is a 24 hour positional check in 6 positions: Face up-32 ss, Face Down-33 ss, Pendant Up-37 ss, Pendant left-17 ss, Pendant right-51 ss, Pendant down-67 ss.
    The first 3 positions are always consistently very close. The last three go wonkers. You always see the opposite effect from pendant right to pendant left with one gaining, the other loosing. And pendant down throws it's own mud. Being a novice, are we looking at a balance poise issue? If it were to get quite involved to improve I don't know that I would at this point try to dial it in, but would definitely like to do something next time it is serviced to improve it's consistency. I have looked at Hamilton's 6 position 24 hour variation chart for the 992b but was not certain if this was overall variation or deviation from each previous position.
    I tend to be one who likes to get things as close as possible, but realize not all things are cost effective and realistic. Thank you for your time and expertise!

    Dale
     
  2. doug sinclair

    doug sinclair Registered User

    Aug 27, 2000
    14,364
    55
    48
    Calgary, Alberta
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    I think you're looking for another watchmaker! Did you have a face to face with the person who supposedly fixed it? Was this person is recommended to you by someone who has had better results from the same shop? There could be many reasons it is so erratic. Poise, hairspring problems, balance pivot problems, balance jewel problems, or something related to the technique of whoever worked on it. Or a combination of many of these factors. Properly serviced, a 992B is as capable of meeting railroad standards as it was when new.
     
  3. Puckerbrush

    Puckerbrush Registered User

    Dec 8, 2008
    11
    0
    0
    Thank you for the response. I did internet searches for watchmakers and saw a recommendation from a railroader. The Jeweler, has been a several generation business for over one hundred years and was in the past a railroad certified watch inspector. Today they have two certified watchmakers with combined 90 years experience. They are certified for Rolex and Omega. I don't know that I spoke personally with either but I did confer with the owners. I thought it should have been a fair bet.

    Dale
     
  4. doug sinclair

    doug sinclair Registered User

    Aug 27, 2000
    14,364
    55
    48
    Calgary, Alberta
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Firstly, choose your reference time source (WWV, NIST, cable tv, or whatever), then STICK to that time source ONLY! Then probably the best bet would be for you to keep a log which includes date, set to the second, position the watch is tested in, then updating the log each day showing variation of rate, whether re-set, indicating re-wind, noting change of position, etc. etc. Do this for several days. Then present the log to the shop and ask to speak to the technician who did it. Properly done, a 992B should be quite capable of maintaining a rate of + or - 30-seconds per week. I have six 992Bs that do! Let them know that this is what you expect. If this watch was mailed to somebody for service, let them know in no uncertain terms that this is what you expect! Modern watchmakers work on quartz watches mostly. With those, you don't have to fuss with them to get them to keep time, so watchmakers get lazy. A 70 year old watch is the colour of another horse. You must fuss with them to get the best out of them. If they say they can't meet your expected standards, find someone else.
     
  5. Puckerbrush

    Puckerbrush Registered User

    Dec 8, 2008
    11
    0
    0
    Thank you for that direction. I have been tracking the time using NIST and a stopwatch usually twice a day, since November, except for the positional variation over 24 hour 7 day increments when not in use.

    Dale
     
  6. doug sinclair

    doug sinclair Registered User

    Aug 27, 2000
    14,364
    55
    48
    Calgary, Alberta
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    I don't know what you mean by the "tracking the time using NIST and a stop watch" stick with one time source. And one only. You need ONE time source that you know is accurate. Otherwise, you'll never have an accurate assessment of the timing of your watch.
     
  7. Puckerbrush

    Puckerbrush Registered User

    Dec 8, 2008
    11
    0
    0
    Sorry. Just meant that I use NIST as my time source only. I use a stop watch because it's easier for me than trying to eyeball consistently. With the stop watch I can gauge consistently within 1/4 to 1/2 second. Don't know that it matters that much, but it takes my eyes out of the equation.

    Dale
     

Share This Page