1944. Model # 122 Ridgeway.

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by Paul fenian, Jun 25, 2020.

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  1. Paul fenian

    Paul fenian Registered User

    Jun 24, 2020
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    My girlfriend and I inherited this clock from her great Aunt and would like to know more about it if anyone would like to give us some input?

    20200619_153754.jpg 20200619_153959.jpg
     
  2. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    Nov 13, 2011
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    well, you did not just win the lottery. :cool:

    That’s a relatively inexpensive clock with a movement that’s probably well past its lifespan, that would cost more to fix up then it would cost you to get a much nicer clock off your local craigslist.

    unless... if you happened to be mechanically inclined and horologically interested, there are a lot of nice people in the clock repair forum who would help walk you through removing the hands, pulling the dial, removing the movement, taking the movement apart, cleaning it, putting it back together, giving it some fresh oil... leaving you with a clock that runs again.

    but it’s kind of not worth it (imho)
     
    Paul fenian likes this.
  3. gleber

    gleber Registered User

    Jun 15, 2015
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    As an inherited clock, we can presume there is some sentimental value to your girlfriend. The clock IS over 75 years old. I only see 1 weight/chain and the pendulum is not connected, which may mean the suspension spring from which it hangs is broken. Do you know if all the pieces are there? Marketwise, its value is not much, and as Bruce says there are lots of nicer clocks on internet sites for not very much. The first question for you is how important is THIS clock to you and your girlfriend. Knowing that we can provide better insight and advice.

    Tom
     
  4. new2clocks

    new2clocks Registered User
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    Apr 25, 2005
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    Welcome to the forum.

    If the paperwork you show is original to the clock, then your clock is not older than the early 1960s, as evidenced by the envelope, which shows a 5 digit zip code,

    The 5 digit zip code was not created until 1963, and was not in general use until later.

    Regards.
     
  5. Paul fenian

    Paul fenian Registered User

    Jun 24, 2020
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    It was together when we received it , but broke do to hauling it the wrong was I'm sure. From what I know is that it did work well while in use but sat idle for a few consecutive years. I also believe that it was 2008 that it was last srrvice
     
  6. Paul fenian

    Paul fenian Registered User

    Jun 24, 2020
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    We like it . like me she likes it due to it being older and from the WW2 Era along with sentimental reasons
     
  7. Paul fenian

    Paul fenian Registered User

    Jun 24, 2020
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    Really? I was going by what I had heard about the last 2 numbers of the serial number is the year made!?
     
  8. new2clocks

    new2clocks Registered User
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    Apr 25, 2005
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    The best way to extract information about your clock is to show clear pictures of the back of the movement and any tags/stickers that may be attached to the interior of the case.

    As I said, if the envelope was part of the paperwork that came with the clock originally, it can not be earlier than 1963, and most likely later. To confirm the vintage of your clock pictures will be necessary as I mentioned above.

    Regards.
     
  9. John Arrowood

    John Arrowood Registered User
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    Dec 14, 2001
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    Was Ridgeway in business in 1944? And at that time most factories were busily working to aid the war effort. Brass would be needed for munitions and would be scarce. When the Army's Manhattan District needed tons of copper wire to wind the huge electromagnets used in the separation of uranium for the atomic bomb, there was very little available so the got tons of silver from the Treasury Dept to make into wire. At the end of the war all the silver was returned to the Treasury Dept.
     

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