American PW 1890 Waltham Ladies 6s seaside balance wheel.

Discussion in 'Watch Repair' started by watchwelder, Jul 25, 2014.

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  1. watchwelder

    watchwelder Registered User

    Jul 12, 2014
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    Hello,

    I am kind of new at this but I am looking for a balance wheel it appears the shaft is worn on both ends. It will only keep steady momentum when sitting level. It moves quite a lot and I was wondering if I should also replace both jewels? Not visibly damaged but there is a lot of movement.

    Watchwelder.
     
  2. EdinKali

    EdinKali Registered User

    Apr 7, 2013
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    Elk Grove, CA
    I have worked on many 6s model 1890's. It is much more likely the balance shaft is broken. It should not be loose (movement up and down). There should be very fine pins/shafts sticking out of both the top and bottom of the balance shaft. If both ends just come to a point, both the top and bottom of the balance shaft have been broken off. The two most common problems I come across on this model are broken or bent balance shafts and broken main springs.
     
  3. watchwelder

    watchwelder Registered User

    Jul 12, 2014
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    Thank you,

    The bottom and top both are pretty much gone. So there would be no real reason to replace the jewels I'm assuming. Do you know of somewhere I can get a balance shaft? This seems to be my only real issue with the moving pieces. However the face of the piece is cracked and chipped. The minute hand and second hand is missing but I have some original Waltham hands to replace them.
     
  4. Kevin W.

    Kevin W. Registered User
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    Apr 11, 2002
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    I work at the Veritas Tools machine shop.
    Nepean, Ontario, Canada
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    A watch repair person can re staff it.
     
  5. EdinKali

    EdinKali Registered User

    Apr 7, 2013
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    Elk Grove, CA
    You can get the balance shafts off ebay for reasonable prices but unless you have the proper tools to replace a shaft you would be better off letting a watch repair person handle it as Kevin said. You are likely to cause more damage if you are not experienced at replacing balance shafts.
     
  6. watchwelder

    watchwelder Registered User

    Jul 12, 2014
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    I am not experienced in replacing the shaft but is there somewhere I could send the wheel (with old shaft and hairspring) to be replaced and balanced? Then sent back to me to reinstall myself. My Waltham model 1857 has the exact same issue.
     
  7. richiec

    richiec Registered User
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    Feb 24, 2007
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    Watchwelder, You also need to examine the balance jewels with a 5X or 10X loupe, you will probably find that they are also damaged, it is very rare that the staff breaks on a watch that old that some damage does not occur to the jewels. Personally, unless this is a prized heirloom or a highly jeweled movement(though Seasides are usually 7 jewels), you might be better off moneywise finding a good, working movement.
     
  8. watchwelder

    watchwelder Registered User

    Jul 12, 2014
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    Thank you,

    This particular watch is just for me to practice and learn with. I would rather replace the jewels too. I really would like to do as much of the work myself and am attempting to learn hands on. I strongly feel if I didn't break the shaft myself from the disassembly and reassembly I probably made it worse. I took the watch apart to learn and did just that. Now I am looking to find more styles of watches in bad condition and learn from taking them apart and learning about the different styles and movements. I have had both of the above mentioned watches just about as far apart as you can (the 1857 was in rough shape) and brought them both back to life. Well visually anyway. I should have taken pictures because the difference between start and finish was amazing. Sorry to ramble on but this is a case of a small hobby that turned into somewhat of a passion.
     
  9. Smudgy

    Smudgy Registered User
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    May 20, 2003
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    I'm surprised you were successful with the 1857. The full plate movement is one that most novices are guided away from due to the likelihood of breaking parts during dis-assembly and re-assembly. 12S and 16S 3/4 plate American movements from Elgin or Waltham are generally preferred due to the easy re-assembly and availability of parts. The Swiss bar movements are really the easiest to re-assemble, but replacement parts is an issue. There are a lot of threads involving getting started on the board.

    Whoever does the staff will also need the bottom plate, balance cock, and jewels available in order to fit the staff and set the beat. I don't think the Seaside movements used the friction staff or the break away rivet, so a lathe will be needed to replace the staff. Then the balance will need to be trued and poised. If you go to the NAWCC home page you can look in the Business Directory to find a repairman that is located near you, or one that you are comfortable working with through the mail.

    You probably will want to learn to restaff a watch and replace jewels at some point because they are really common problems for watches without shock protection. Once you get a lathe you will also want to learn to make your own staff. Good luck with the endeavor.
     
  10. watchwelder

    watchwelder Registered User

    Jul 12, 2014
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    Thank you for the information. I am always tinkering with things and now I have finally found a way to channel that. I enjoy the challenge and I think the main thing is I don't mind taking my time and being thorough. One more thing is where would you advise I seek broken or repairable watches? I am not really into buying perfect finished watches yet other than the ones I have I mainly prefer to work on them and learn more about the internals.
     
  11. richiec

    richiec Registered User
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    Feb 24, 2007
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    Ebay comes to mind as one of the major sources and local chapter marts. You can usually buy lots of broken movements for good money and see if you can make a pig out of a poke. I did that at the beginning and have a vast inventory of Waltham parts but very few 6S 1891.
     
  12. Smudgy

    Smudgy Registered User
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    Ebay is a good place (under watch tools and parts). Another place is Dash-To. Some of the parts sellers also carry a small inventory of 'mechanic specials'. But you will probably find out that everyone you know has a drawer full of broken watches that they don't know what to do with.
     
  13. Mikollectibles

    Mikollectibles Registered User

    Jul 18, 2011
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    #13 Mikollectibles, Aug 14, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 31, 2017
    eBay is a great source. Personally, I had a bad experience with DashTo and wouldn't shop there again. I find that several well formed Google searches produces many out-of-the-country suppliers that you wouldn't normally come across. I've gotten impossible to find Hamilton parts as well as a détente for an old "Record" from Ireland and India.
     

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