Help 1858 Seth Thomas Column and Cornice Strike Issue

captainclock

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Mar 4, 2013
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Hello everyone, the other day I decided I would replace the nylon weight cord that I got from Timesavers with some Chalkline rope like someone else on here had suggested so that the weight cord would have a more period correct look, and when I did that I ended up messing up the strike train mechanism.

The part that actuates the count wheel and then stops it after the correct amount of strikes has been reached was bent and when I tried to straighten it out I ended up splitting the part that goes into the strike wheel teeth so now it doesn't function properly, and I was wondering if there's a name for that part and whether or not a replacement of that part can be bought somewhere as it doesn't seem that Timesavers has that part in stock anywhere (they have the strike wheels themselves but they don't have the parts that go with the strike wheel mechanism).

Any help would be appreciated.
 

Vernon

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Dec 9, 2006
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I'm afraid that this is a part that you will need to repair which is not too difficult. Remove the arbor and support it in a vice, then file off the head of the wire and drive it out. Fit new wire of same diameter through hole, deform the end then tap it back so that it wedges solid in the hole. Beat the other end of wire to form the feather, file to shape. Bend the 90 to match original. After installed, final adjustments should be made near the arbor and the 90 bend.

Vernon
 

captainclock

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Mar 4, 2013
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Elkhart, Indiana
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I'm afraid that this is a part that you will need to repair which is not too difficult. Remove the arbor and support it in a vice, then file off the head of the wire and drive it out. Fit new wire of same diameter through hole, deform the end then tap it back so that it wedges solid in the hole. Beat the other end of wire to form the feather, file to shape. Bend the 90 to match original. After installed, final adjustments should be made near the arbor and the 90 bend.

Vernon
OK, so I'm assuming to make the new piece for my count wheel actuator is the same type of steel stock as what is used on the pendulum suspension rods? If so I'm assuming I could just take some pendulum suspension rod material and use that to make the piece I need to repair my count wheel actuator?
 

Vernon

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I've used pivot wire due to that was all that I had with a size selection but that was pretty hard to work with. I would use it again but anneal first. I think that suspension rod wire may be on the light side.

Vernon
 

captainclock

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Mar 4, 2013
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I've used pivot wire due to that was all that I had with a size selection but that was pretty hard to work with. I would use it again but anneal first. I think that suspension rod wire may be on the light side.

Vernon
OK, I'll look into that. Is the pivot wire something that is readily available through parts suppliers like Timesavers or Merritt's?
Or could I use some small gauge steel rod stock from the hardware store?
 

Vernon

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I stick with the suppliers or maybe a good hobby store. I've never found anything suitable for clockwork at the hardware store. Time saver has plain carbon steel 17724 then you wouldn't have to anneal.

Vernon
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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Regular mild steel wire is good.

If the suspension rod cut-offs seem to soft, they can be 'twist hardened'. Put one end in the drill chuck and the other in the vise. Twist away but don't overdo it. Keep a strong outward pull on the drill.

A long piece of wire is easier to do than a short one.

Willie X
 

captainclock

Registered User
Mar 4, 2013
437
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Elkhart, Indiana
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Regular mild steel wire is good.

If the suspension rod cut-offs seem to soft, they can be 'twist hardened'. Put one end in the drill chuck and the other in the vise. Twist away but don't overdo it. Keep a strong outward pull on the drill.

A long piece of wire is easier to do than a short one.

Willie X
I'll give both ideas a try, because I have tons of suspension rod cut-offs from when I was trying to make a suspension rod for this clock, I can also check the local Michael's or Hobby Lobby and see if they have some steel rods.
 

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