1789/90 verge signed James Bennitt, Uttoxeter

Discussion in 'European & Other Pocket Watches' started by John Matthews, Dec 2, 2018.

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  1. John Matthews

    John Matthews Registered User
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    #1 John Matthews, Dec 2, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2018
    The movement of this Uttoxeter verge is currently winding down after an initial ¼ turn test wind. As far as I can determine the movement is simply in need of a service, so this is to be my next project. Unfortunately, the case is in need of work that is beyond my current abilities - the bezel is broken at the hinge, so in the need of a silversmith's skills.

    20181202 005-2.jpg 20181202 006.jpg

    The Uttoxeter-Ashbourne area is one I know well and at the end of the C18th, beginning of the C19th century, had more clockmakers and 'watchmakers' than might be expected in such a rural community. The majority of the in-house skills were directed towards clocks, and while Uttoxeter signed watches are not uncommon, the majority, if not all, were probably finished in Coventry, Lancashire or London and simply retailed in the town. It is possible that a few may have been finished locally.

    This movement is housed in Birmingham 1789/90 hallmarked pair cases with the maker's mark 'HH', that of Henry Harding, Wells Street, Coventry registered 29 October, 1782. The signature on the movement is that James Bennitt a master clockmaker, who is known to have taken three clockmaking apprentices, John Steel in 1776, Thomas Alkin in 1785 and George Nash in 1796. McKenna records that James Bennitt was apprenticed to Thomas Silitto, also of Uttoxeter, in 1753. However, when I checked Dennis Moore's book, he records that Silitto took as an apprentice James Bennis in 1753. I believe the original records were handwritten and therefore this may well have been a transcription error. Loomes records James Bennitt as James Bennett and ascribed him as an apprentice to Sillito in 1753.

    Those of you with an interest in longcase clocks may be more familiar with these names and I would be grateful for anything you can add.

    I attach photographs of the case and movement as received.

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    John
     
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  2. John Matthews

    John Matthews Registered User
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    Having allowed the movement to wind down, I have removed the dial. The hairlines in the dial appear to be stable and with gentle cleaning should become less obvious.

    20181202 006-2.jpg 20181202 001-3.jpg

    The pillar plate is an oily mess!. The motion work appears to need just a clean.

    20181202 001-2.jpg

    However, the set up ratchet has deformed teeth and will need to be replaced. The tail of the click is bent and will need attention. Beneath the motion work there are four deep score marks and the associated ridges raise the gear slightly from the plate. Is this their purpose and has anyone seen this before?


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    Perhaps the most interesting feature is the 'A4' punch mark which was almost completely hidden by the motion work and the movement retaining clip spring. Any suggestions as to its possible significance would be much appreciated?


    20181202 005-2-2.jpg 20181202 004-2.jpg

    John
     
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  3. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi John.

    The click tail is supposed to be curved and is presumably meant to engage with the pin in the plate to constrain its movement. However this pin isn't usually fitted as it really isn't required. If the tail become bent and unable to disengage fully with the ratchet wheel that could account for the mangled teeth. I have seen various dents and gouges under the minute wheel to raise it slightly clear of the plate, and in this case it looks as though the fusee bottom pivot is slightly proud, so that could be another reason for it.

    The appearance of the dial will be much improved by a soak in denture cleaner. I haven't seen the 'A4' stamp before but I think it's likely to be connected with the frame maker. The 'transitional' regulator appears to have lost its pointer which should be visible over the scale in the top plate. These were often made of steel and dovetailed into the underside of the regulator rack ring.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
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  4. John Matthews

    John Matthews Registered User
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    Hi Graham ... well spotted

    upload_2018-12-2_18-53-11.png

    No it is there - cunningly in disguise above the barrel arbor ...

    upload_2018-12-2_18-49-39.png

    After I took the photograph I tested the adjuster and it moves the pointer as it should.

    I agree, if it was a code, e.g, style & size or whatever, it might be found on other movements, it will be interesting if it occurs elsewhere on other components of this movement or indeed on other movements. Or there again perhap the stamp of A(pprentice)4 :).

    John
     
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  5. Tim Fitzgerald

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    Very nice John
    Looks like you have your work cut out for you! I'm looking forward to it's progress
     
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  6. John Matthews

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    I have continued to dismantle the movement and having controlled the mainspring unwind, I have removed the third wheel, the balance and the intermediate type regulator. Here are my observations so far – I would appreciate comment and, where necessary, correction.

    The underside of the balance cock foot has three triangular punch marks, all of which have pronounced burrs, which I believe were used to alter the staff endshake and are not batch marks (Graham's comment here).

    20181203 004.jpg 20181203 001.jpg 20181203 002.jpg

    The regulator is in good order and in the photograph the hairspring does not pass between the regulator pins – I cannot be certain whether or not I lifted the spring out of position when I removed the balance cock. There is a very distinctive mark stamped on the underside of the regulator plate, which is possibly a maker's mark. As elsewhere, there is evidence of the liberal action of an 'oil can'.

    20181203 005.jpg 20181203 009.jpg 20181203 011.jpg 20181203 012.jpg

    There are a number of indentations clustered around the the upper plate barrel pivot hole which appear to have been made with a drill.

    20181203 013.jpg 20181203 013-2.jpg

    The upper banking pin can be seen in the mouth of the square staff opening in the upper plate.

    20181203 010.jpg 20181203 014.jpg

    John
     
  7. John Matthews

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    The hairspring is kinked at the point where it was pinned and is not planar. Judging by the position when it was released from the regulation pins, I believe it will be necessary to make some adjustment to the position of the outer coil, I am not certain whether this might most simply be achieved by moving the pinning point closer to the end of the hairspring.

    20181203 007.jpg 20181203 008.jpg 20181203 015.jpg 20181203 016.jpg

    Although there is some pitting of the flags, I don't think that it is excess, but would appreciate guidance. Similarly, I would appreciate an opinion regarding the staff pivots, which appear to be poorly formed.

    20181203 016-2.jpg 20181203 017.jpg 20181203 018.jpg 20181203 019.jpg 20181203 020.jpg

    John
     
  8. Tim Fitzgerald

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    Great photos they will help when I get the nerve and junker movement to learn on. :)
    Thanks John
     
  9. Omexa

    Omexa Registered User
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    See, Member News and Views; Uttoxeter. Regards Ray
     
  10. John Matthews

    John Matthews Registered User
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    Hi Ray - enjoyed your snippet ... do you remember the surname of your 'Pommy John'?

    There is a lot of brewing in this part of Staffordshire - principally Burton-on-Trent. I did find ...

    Uttoxeter Brewery
    Founded 1829 by Thomas Earp and Edward Saunders apparently.
    Bought by Charles Bunting supposedly in 1890's and closed by a fire 1930's Demolished 1974
    We moved into the area in 1979 so I have no knowledge of it.

    John
     
  11. Omexa

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    Hi John, his name was John Peacock. A really nice person who was trained as a Teacher and worked for Tasmania Mental Health, getting people back into society by taking them Fishing, to Markets and Cricket Matches etc. an ideal job; it did have a down side; taking them to the Toilet. Regards Ray
     
  12. John Matthews

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    This afternoon I have completed the dismantling of the movement. First impressions are positive in that, as far as I can tell, there is nothing seriously amiss with the train. It is certainly in need of a thorough clean and shows symptoms of many years of dirt having been recently mobilised by a liberal application of oil. Hopefully it hasn't been run too long in its current state as I'm sure the oily debris would have acted as a very effective grinding paste.

    20181204 001.jpg 20181204 003.jpg 20181204 004.jpg 20181204 005.jpg 20181204 019.jpg 20181204 020.jpg

    The crown wheel teeth show little evidence of wear; the shaft and pinion appear to be in good order

    20181204 012.jpg 20181204 013.jpg

    The potence and follower pivot holes, I don't believe are excessively worn from initial examination.

    20181204 006.jpg 20181204 007.jpg 20181204 009.jpg 20181204 010.jpg

    to be continued ...
     
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  13. John Matthews

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    Similarly, the gears and pinions of the contrate wheel and train, appear to me to only require cleaning, although the arbor of the central wheel that supports the cannon pinion is quite badly scored.

    20181204 018.jpg 20181204 017.jpg 20181204 021.jpg 20181204 022.jpg 20181204 014.jpg 20181204 015.jpg 20181204 016.jpg

    The external fusee maintaining ratchet looks untidy and a portion appears worn. This is in part because the outer edge if the lowest portion of the fusee spiral has also cut to give clearance to the click. I will need to examine this portion of the fusee to ensure that the click does not come in contact with the chain.

    20181204 023.jpg 20181204 024.jpg 20181204 002-2.jpg 20181204 002-2-2.jpg

    to be continued ...
     
  14. John Matthews

    John Matthews Registered User
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    My initial impression is that the spring is probably a replacement and although it appears to be in good condition, it is possibly too long.

    20181204 025.jpg 20181204 026.jpg 20181204 027.jpg 20181204 028.jpg

    John
     
  15. John Matthews

    John Matthews Registered User
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    Before starting to clean the movement, I have remounted the crown wheel and balance to check the hairspring. As a result of my observations, without removing the hairspring from the shaft, I have made some minor adjustments to remove the kink where the spring had been pinned, to open the outer coil slightly and to bring the coils back to a plane perpendicular to the shaft.

    20181205 001.jpg 20181205 003.jpg

    The centricity of the inner coil could be improved and the end outwith the pinning point is slightly high. However, the outer coil now sits naturally between the regulation pins and its curvature follows the position of the pins as they are adjusted. Therefore, I have decided to make no further adjustments until after testing, when I have positioned the balance and pinned the hairspring at the end of the service.

    John
     
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  16. John Matthews

    John Matthews Registered User
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    I have now cleaned and re-assembled the movement. At the risk of Graham's wrath, I have to admit I did not remove the mainspring, neither did I completely dismantle the fusee. As with the Richard Haywood signed verge I described here there is significant end shake in the shaft carrying the crown wheel.

    20181206 002.jpg 20181206 003.jpg 20181206 004.jpg

    The assembly when smoothly, until the point when after installing the regulator plate, I came to oil the pivots - the contrate pivot hole was beneath the regulator plate!

    20181206 001-2.jpg 20181206 003-2.jpg 20181206 005.jpg 20181206 006.jpg 20181206 007.jpg 20181207 002.jpg 20181207 003.jpg

    I was able to source a suitable (un-blued) set-up ratchet wheel from my spares and confirmed that there was sufficient space between the post and the click 'tail' to release it.

    20181207 005.jpg

    to be continued ...
     
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  17. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi John,

    As long as you, (and anyone else reading this later), know why and in what context this should be done, and the possible consequences of not doing it, it doesn't matter too much.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
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  18. John Matthews

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    #18 John Matthews, Dec 7, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2018
    The mainspring, as I mentioned previously, may be a replacement, it appears to be too long for the barrel. I am now questioning whether the barrel has been replaced. My reason is the significant gap between the barrel and the plates - it looks to me as if the barrel is too thin - am I correct?

    20181207 006.jpg 20181207 001-2.jpg

    Because of the gap and the initial angle of the chain passing from the barrel to the fusee, I was extremely careful executing the first wind. At the first attempt the chain jumped the lowest fusee grove after ~1/4 of a turn, but after allowing the chain to unwind, on the second attempt I was able to achieve a full wind and the fusee stop was activated with almost a complete turn of the chain remaining on the barrel. I then left the movement to run on the bench ...

    20181207 007.jpg

    After a few minutes it stopped :(

    The way it came to a halt made me think that the flags were not engaging correctly with the crown wheel. Graham had previously said that the when a verge was operating the crown wheel shaft tends to be pushed away from the flags. Given the end shake I had noted earlier, I rotated the movement to the 'pendant up' position so that for the crown wheel to move away from the flags it would have to do so against gravity. Since repositioning the movement it has worked continuously. When it comes to the end of the wind, I will try and make a minor adjustment to the position of the follower to reduce the end shake, and hopefully achieve working in all positions before completing the build.

    John
     
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  19. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi John,

    It's better to preempt this situation by easing the chain into the right place on the barrel at each quarter or half turn of the barrel. If you do this gradually there shouldn't be any risk of it jumping, or worse, lying over flat on its side.

    The barrel does look rather too shallow for the pillar height, but although the spring is most probably a replacement, the barrel and its arbor may not be. When these were made, the aesthetic aspect wasn't a high priority!

    Regards,

    Graham
     
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  20. John Matthews

    John Matthews Registered User
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    Hi Graham - for clarification ...

    This being that, the barrel & fusee should normally be completed dismantling into its component parts for inspection & service. This is essential for a fully comprehensive service which should always be undertaken if a watch is to be used on a regular basis. I have omitted to do so on the basis that the winding mechanism was functioning correctly before the watch was dismantled, examination of both the spring and fusee revealed no significant problems and, most importantly, I was looking to create a working example, that was serviced to the extent that it would function correctly when wound once or twice a year. It would not be used on a regular basis and is unlikely ever to be worn.

    I did attempt to do this as you had previously suggested. I interpreted this to mean during the wind, i.e. wind a 1/4 turn and ease down the chain on the barrel and repeat. I assumed you didn't mean as you wind the chain onto the barrel initially. In this instance, I was probably being over-cautious because of the gap between the plate and barrel.

    John
     
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  21. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi John,

    Yes, I did mean that you do it as it's wound. It does help if you can get it fairly evenly spaced when you install the chain, but that's not so easy with the standard watchmaker's specification of only two hands.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
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  22. John Matthews

    John Matthews Registered User
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    :)
     
  23. John Matthews

    John Matthews Registered User
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    This morning I attempted to make that small adjustment ....

    The plug in the follower initially refused to move, and when it did, unfortunately, there was a combination of rotational and outward movement - as a result the crown wheel shaft pivots came out of both the follower plug and the potence. :(.

    I was very concerned that the pivots might have been damaged and wary that there might be residual pressure in the train. As a precaution I applied some blue tac to the barrel and contrate wheel, while I released any remaining tension on the mainspring.

    20181209 001.jpg 20181209 002.jpg

    Tentatively, I dismantled the movement. To my considerable relief there was no evidence of damage :).

    When I reassembled the crown wheel shaft I adjusted the position of the follower plug by reference to the photographs I had taken during the initial build. In doing so I tried to reduce the end shake to approximately half that I had observed previously.

    I am please to say that when I wound the assembled movement, it immediately started in the dial down position. I have rotated it briefly and it appears to work in all positions, although in the pendant down position it was initially a little hesitant. It is possible that there may still be a little too much end shake in the shaft. If so, my understanding is that this will become more obvious when I check the timing.

    20181209 003.jpg

    John
     
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  24. John Matthews

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    The movement ran successfully to the end of the chain. This morning I have completed the re-build and placed it back in its pair cases, I have had to use the hands which came with the watch, as I have no suitable replacements. The mechanism has been fully wound and is working in the face up position to perform the initial check on the timing.

    20181211 001.jpg 20181211 002.jpg 20181211 003.jpg 20181211 004.jpg

    John
     
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  25. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi John,

    It's worth addressing this, even though in normal use the watch would not assume this position, and pocket watches aren't usually timed PD.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
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  26. Keith R...

    Keith R... Registered User
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    John I love this watch. But you guys can't fool us, there's a set of gold hands
    you're thinking about making for this watch.

    Might I get in line for a set? I'm thinking of fully restoring the Van Wyck.:)

    Great job on this one team!!!

    Keith R...
     
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  27. John Matthews

    John Matthews Registered User
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    After a number of attempts last week, I was unable to achieve better than a ~60 minute loss over 24 hours. Apart from adjusting the regulator, I also attempted to increase the end play to reduce the engagement of the pallets with the crown wheel. During one attempt the plug moved too far and as a result the pivot dropped out of its hole in the plug, fortunately, resulting in no damage.

    So over the weekend I have re-positioned the hairspring on the shaft, by rotating the collet 180 degrees clockwise and re-pinning the effectively shortened hairspring. The movement ran overnight on a full wind. This morning I completed the rebuild and started the initial timing.

    In the first hour I have seen a loss of ~1 minute, so if this continues I will have reduced the loss by ~50%. At the end of 24 hours I will perform one further timing after adjusting the regulator and then consider whether it is necessary to reduce the effective length of the hairspring further.

    I would appreciate a view as to whether the impact of the reduction in effective length of the hairspring, that I have seen, is what might be expected.

    John
     
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  28. Tom McIntyre

    Tom McIntyre Technical Admin
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    Just a thought... going back to the basic physics of a spring mass oscillator, the frequency of oscillation depends on the mass, being slower with more mass and the elastic force of the spring, being faster with higher elastic force. In practical term you cannot make your existing balance heavier, so you only option is to increase the elastic force of the spring by making it shorter. Since it appears to have started with 2 1/2 turns, I suspect it may have been changed for a spring with less stiffness some time in the past.

    Perhaps you did not need to reposition the collet, only take a full turn out of the spring. (not seriously, I am sure that would be too much since you would be left with 1 1/2 turns.)
     
  29. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi John,

    The trouble is, we can never know what's been done to a watch in its long history, so often have to go back to first principles as Tom implies.

    Well, you actually could make a plain balance heavier, but it would be a totally unacceptable bodge and get you drummed out of the Brownies . . .

    Regards,

    Graham
     
  30. Tom McIntyre

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    Graham, how short a hairspring have you seen from this period? Are there some 1 1/2 turn examples out there? The secondary effect is that the regulator becomes much more sensitive when the spring is shortened in these sparse turn examples.
     
  31. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi Tom,

    I can't recall one as short as this from the 1780s, I think they're mostly 2½ to 3½ turns at least; a 1½ turn balance spring is more characteristic of the beginning of the century. As I said in post #29, we just don't know what's been replaced.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
  32. John Matthews

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    With the hairspring in its effectively reduced length (I did not physically reduce it) and the regulator at the fast end of the regulator scale, I have been able to reduce the loss to 3 minutes in 24 hours (1 minute in 8 hours overnight). I shall now allow the watch to run to the end of the wind.

    I propose to then rotate the hairspring collet clockwise an angular distance equivalent to half the regulation arc and re-time – I assume this is the appropriate amount.

    In all probability, I will have to physically shorten the spring this time, as the free end may impede the oscillation of the balance. We will see. I will provide a photograph of the balance once I have achieved acceptable timing with the regulator in the mid position.

    John
     
  33. Tom McIntyre

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    Presuming that the current hairspring is a replacement, you may want to consider using a slightly stronger replacement that could be made to the expected 3 1/2 turns. Of course, you would want to retain the current one for the full history of the piece.
     
  34. John Matthews

    John Matthews Registered User
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    Tom - I have no evidence that it is a replacement, so on that basis I see no reason to replace it. Even if it is, I would rather work with what is present. More so given that it still working on my desk and is running rather better than my previous estimate. It has now been running for 17 hours and is only 1.5 minutes slow, I think that is pretty good for a watch of 1790.

    John
     
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  35. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi Tom,

    With the progress that John has achieved lately, I fully expect he'll be vibrating balance springs to time the balances before too long!

    It's just as well that the mechanisms involved with the angle of development of the spring from the collet in positions were not discovered when this watch was made.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
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  36. John Matthews

    John Matthews Registered User
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    Graham - I'm afraid I don't understand this - an explanation would be much appreciated.

    This afternoon with the last timing run ended, I have rotated the hairspring collet to further shorten the effective length of the hairspring. Initially, as a precaution, I applied a small amount of blue tac carefully to the contrate wheel to prevent any rotation before removing the balance cock.

    I marked the balance wheel with the current position of the regulation pins (regulator at the fast end of the scale).

    20181219 001.jpg

    With the regulator in the mid-point of the scale I made a second mark on the balance wheel corresponding to the new position of the regulation pins. I measured the angular distance between these two points as 45 degrees.

    20181219 002.jpg

    After unpinning the hairspring, I removed the balance and rotated the hairspring by 45 degrees. On replacing the balance and pinning the hairspring, it was clear that the free tail of the hairspring would impede the oscillation, so I reduced its physical length by approximately 10mm.

    20181219 003.jpg 20181219 004.jpg

    I appreciate that the shape of the hairspring could be improved, the outer coil deviates from the ideal position when the regulation is at the fast end of the scale, but I decided to wait until I see the results of the initial timing run, which I commenced, with the regulator in the mid position, 45 minutes ago.

    John
     
  37. Tom McIntyre

    Tom McIntyre Technical Admin
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    In theory, isochronism requires that the form of the spring be unchanged as it oscillates. i.e. it only scales but conforms to the same mathematical spiral formula. If the shape changes then it will suffer a change in rate with power applied. Avoiding this was the reason helical hairsprings and overcoils were developed.
     
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  38. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi John,

    Sorry about that. It was found by Jules (aka Julius) Grossman that when the watch is in its most usual position, (pendant up for an openface pocket watch), the balance spring should emerge from the collet on a horizontal line through its centre and develop upwards. There is a natural vertical positional error, (the generic difference in rate between horizontal and vertical positions), which is moved into the pendant down position if this condition is met, and that position isn't encountered in normal wear. This is dealt with in some detail by Donald de Carle in chapter 14 of his 'Practical Watch Repairing', with an illustration in figure 244. This is not unrelated to Tom's remarks regarding isochronism and the way the spring 'breathes', but I think it's also influenced by the effects of gravity.

    When all is considered, these matters have limited relevance for 18th century verges!

    Regards,

    Graham
     
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  39. Tim Fitzgerald

    Tim Fitzgerald Registered User
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    Great result you must be very proud of yourself :)
     
  40. John Matthews

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    Tim - I appreciate your comment, thank-you

    Graham - many thanks for the explanation and the reference. Apology not necessary

    To make sure I understand. There is a positional error of 30 seconds slower between the horizontal position (e.g. dial up) and one of the vertical positions (pendant up [PU] or down [PD]). Grossman discovered that the position that the spring emerges from the collet dictates whether this is observed in the PU or PD. For a pocket watch it is preferable that the error would be seen in the PD position (as the watch is normally worn PU) and this can be controlled by positioning the collet so the spring emerges upwards from the centre line.

    On that basis, the position before I made the last adjustment, was such that the vertical positional error would have been in the PD position ...

    20181219 001-2.jpg

    but having rotated 45 degrees I have moved it away from the ideal position ....

    20181219 004-2.jpg

    The watch in the DU position is, after 6 hours, running a minute fast with the regulator pins half way between the midpoint and the slow end of the regulator scale. So I have slightly overcompensated. I will make one final adjustment to increase the effective length of the spring slightly when the run is complete.

    John
     
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  41. Tim Fitzgerald

    Tim Fitzgerald Registered User
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    WOW! I'll have to think about this tonight, It's a bit over my head
     
  42. John Matthews

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    Graham - I have some Moebuis 9415 escapement grease on order, which I believe you apply lightly to escapement teeth & flags, I would appreciate some advice regarding its application, to the crown wheel and flags in particular. With this watch, given the stage I have reached, it would be simple to apply it in a controlled manner to the flags, but not so straightforward to apply to the crown wheel, as I wasn't anticipating separating the plates.

    John
     
  43. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi John,

    Yes, I would apply the tiniest smear to the acting surfaces of the flags; not only is it easier to apply there, it's a more controlled way of ensuring it stays where it's needed.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
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  44. John Matthews

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    Thanks Graham
     
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  45. John Matthews

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    This morning I made what I hope will be the final adjustment to the hairspring position, rotating it approximately 20 degrees anti-clockwise. I re-fitted the balance after applying a thin smear of Moebius 9415 to the active surfaces of the flags as suggested by Graham.

    web final adjustment.jpg

    I commenced the first timing run at 5 minutes ago.

    John
     
  46. Keith R...

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    #46 Keith R..., Dec 22, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2018
    Good going John, I needed a real watch to look at!!

    I bet if one counted the number of flat three arm balance wheels in my
    collection, it would be more than a dozen. I think we share a dial design
    also.

    Keith R...
     
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  47. John Matthews

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    As the run approaches 24 hours the watch has gained ~2 minutes in the dial up position and with the regulator at the mid point. For a verge approaching 230 years old, I believe this to be an entirely satisfactory outcome. It will be now returned to its tray and await a time when I can have the bezel repaired and a crystal fitted.

    John
     
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  48. Tim Fitzgerald

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    Congratulations on a great job. I would shake your hand If I could. :)
     
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  49. John Matthews

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    Just a few before and after photographs to bring this thread up to date, after having the bezel and hinge repaired, a high dome glass fitted, and repairs to the pendant and bow ...


    20181202 005-2.jpg after ... 20191108 001.jpg

    20181202 005.jpg after ... 20191108 002.jpg 20191108 003.jpg IMG_1496.jpg

    20181202 003.jpg after ... 20191108 004.jpg

    Watch is ticking away nicely on the desk, looking so much better. Many thanks to Seth.

    Hands need to be replaced - advice as to most appropriate would be appreciated - I really like gold arrowheads like so, but that's for the future lots more pressing ....

    upload_2019-11-8_11-16-35.png

    John
     
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  50. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi John,

    The arrowheads are very handsome, but tend to be found on slightly later dials with Arabic hour numerals, more in the Breguet style. I think a well-proportioned spade pattern pair would be more appropriate for this late C18th dial with Roman hour and Arabic 5-minute numerals, but as with everything else, it's a matter of personal preference.

    Regards,

    Graham
     

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