1762 Hawting (attributed)

Discussion in 'Tower, Monumental & Street Clocks' started by Donn Haven Lathrop, Sep 28, 2016.

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  1. Donn Haven Lathrop

    Donn Haven Lathrop Registered User

    Jul 28, 2010
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    The clock is done. Packing it into a U-Haul van for delivery Friday. The clock will be set up in the church, and kept running. Evidently tourists stop in the church for tours, since the church was established in 1634. Interesting.

    Just as a by the way, the garage door opener as a rewind motor has functioned perfectly. And for only $159.00! Total cost less than $400. A lot less than the cost of an AC motor geared down to drive a 100 to 1 worm drive--usually about $8,000 to $10,000 from quotes I've gotten. I put in an SPDT switch so I can drive the motor up or down. Makes maintenance MUCH simpler. Now off to an 1840-odd Holbrook that a local town wants to auto-rewind. It's gonna be interesting to set up the strike train for auto rewind, but if Seth Thomas can do it, so can I.

    motor.jpg
     
  2. FDelGreco

    FDelGreco Registered User
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    Donn:

    I never thought of using a garage door opener for a rewind unit. Great idea! What do you use for a clutch to disengage after rewind is complete? Those are expensive as well.

    Frank
     
  3. gvasale

    gvasale Registered User
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    I'd like to see that too.
     
  4. Donn Haven Lathrop

    Donn Haven Lathrop Registered User

    Jul 28, 2010
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    #4 Donn Haven Lathrop, Sep 29, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2016
    No clutch needed, Frank. You rewire the motor to run in either direction (it's a capacitive run motor) with a single switch. When the weight descends to a pre-determined position it actuates a control switch that starts the motor. When the weight rises to another pre-determined position it turns the control switch off. I had a sprocket made by a very talented machinist to accommodate the narrow chain the door opener uses. Six inch diameter, split so I could clamp it to the second wheel arbor, and it drives the clock with a mere 24.5 pounds. If you want a full description of "How-To-Do-It", I'll write it up and post it here. You can get all the parts and pieces (except the sprocket) from your local hardware store. I used a half horsepower opener. I'm going to try a 1 3/4 horsepower to drive the strike side of an 1840's Holbrook. I think I can do it for less than $1,000. On top of it all, I'm cheap. It would be great if we could post videos on the Forum. What say, Board Members?
     
  5. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    #5 Jim DuBois, Sep 29, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2016
    The beauty of what Donn has done allows the elimination of all the large drive weights and cables and associated risk of frayed and broken cables, and weights falling 40 feet and landing on some hapless party, or just destroying some of the building. It also allows the movemet to be run using the 2nd shaft on both time and strike sides with absolutely no changes to the original movement. I have done a couple of clocks in this fashion, I built a tube frame that holds the entire mechanism, it functions as a Huygens endless loop drive mechanism. It will rewind while striking without problem, and as Donn suggests it is downright reasonable $$$ wise to do. Given there is usually an 8 to 1 gear ratio between the great wheel and the first pinion a clock that requires 400 pounds to run can be run on 1/8th the weight, or 50 pounds. Yes, it rewinds more often But the benefits are huge in my opinion. I have used this method on several tower clocks, small and large. The mechanism can be entirely independent of the clock itself and connected with an independent chain connecting to the split sprocket. Three roller micro switches, a relay, a fuse holder, a simple frame, which can be disassembled on the ground and quickly reassembled in the tower.....I used a gear motor that ran at about 50 rpm, both it new surplus for $100 +/- The wood frame very small tower clock uses the same mechanism only it drives the main shaft in this case.
     

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  6. gvasale

    gvasale Registered User
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    I worked on a ST with a similar or should I say a factory made rewind setup. I replaced all the chain parts with modern roller chain & sprockets. Retrofitting takes a little more effort because of the difference in in the thickness of the sprockets from then to now. I was thinking Donn's idea was to have the weights hanging from the ceiling and falling only 6' or so. We'll have to see what he says.
     
  7. Donn Haven Lathrop

    Donn Haven Lathrop Registered User

    Jul 28, 2010
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    The clock has been delivered, set up and is running. The church is most pleased. So am I. It's been a long seven months. The clock is not in its permanent location. That will be in the multipurpose room, on the wall over the serving opening to the kitchen, on a platform about 15 feet up, spotlighted. Sure would be nice if I could post a short video.

    . installedclock.JPG
     
  8. GregS

    GregS Registered User

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    Donn, very interesting. Perhaps you could post your video to youtube.com and then provide a link to it here. Thanks for sharing!
     
  9. Donn Haven Lathrop

    Donn Haven Lathrop Registered User

    Jul 28, 2010
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  10. Donn Haven Lathrop

    Donn Haven Lathrop Registered User

    Jul 28, 2010
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    The Hawting has now run one month--keeping time, no stoppages, no problems. The "custodian" seems to be the biggest problem. He called me in an absolute swivel because he couldn't figure out how to set the clock back one hour. Stopping the pendulum for an hour seemed to be beyond his comprehension, but he's all set for next Sunday.
     
  11. pidragos

    pidragos Registered User
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    interesting also for me this winding unit.
    I am in discussion with Cumbria clock company in UK for such a system, I need 3 of them for a church clock, to replace the manual winding.
    see the link below
    http://www.clockmaker.co.uk/automatic-winding/
    this is interesting system used in UK, it can be set up and adapted for all clocks driven by weights.
    one unit is much more expensive than your solution, of course, but not too much.
    Chris McKay (British Horological Institute specialist) recommended me to get in contact with the manufacturer, Keith Scobie-Youngs. If any interested, I can share contact info or more details.
     

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