1710 Etherington Table clock with lots of bits missing

Discussion in 'Your Newest Clock Acquisition' started by NigelW, Feb 22, 2019.

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  1. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi Nigel,

    Rather than using heat to melt the shellac stick, why not try dissolving some shellac in alcohol to make a thin paste and using that? The downside is that you'd have to wait for it to dry before going on with the machining, although warming it gently would speed that up. I think your chuck cooled too quickly for the disc to be properly flattened onto it. One way to reduce this effect is to make the stem which is held in the lathe chuck much thinner, so reducing the overall mass of it.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
  2. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    More pinion cutting and graver turning yesterday. The first pic compares an original 1710 pinion (left) with my latest attempt (right). They are not identical but they are now quite close.

    IMGP1970.JPG

    This is the side view of my part-turned arbor (top) and original one (bottom). The tapers on the arbors are not identical (I have taken a bit too much material off at the right hand end of the pinion) but they are probably close enough. I am still trying to get the hang of graver turning but the more I do the easier it is becoming.

    IMGP1971.JPG

    I have got my old Pentax camera back into action for taking photos but I have lost the shoe to attach it to the tripod (and they are no longer available) so the shakiness remains.
     
  3. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    First arbor nearly complete (my first ever, for any clock). The pivots will need further thinning, I have to remove the surplus at each end (these currently have female centres), some more polishing is needed including to the pinion, and I still have to harden and temper. All the finial turning was done between centres with a graver, but I used collets and the cross slide to remove some of the bulk first. I am quite pleased with the result, which will be for the 3rd wheel in the 1/4 repeat train.

    IMGP1972.JPG
     
  4. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    New batch of smaller diameter cast yellow brass rod has just arrived for making the wheel collets:

    20190622_090751.jpg
     
  5. DeanT

    DeanT Registered User

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    Looks good. All the arbours will be slightly different as they are hand turned so I doubt you will be able to tell the difference between old and new.

    Cheers
     
  6. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Two steps forwards, one step back today.

    I took three of my quarter repeat arbors with integral pinions, all now turned, to my class today to be taught how to harden them. First step is to cover them in soap, wrap with soft iron wire, and then soap them again:

    20190701_135153.jpg 20190701_143101.jpg

    Next step was to heat to cherry red then plunge vertically into brine and move around vigourously. So far, so good. When unwrapped they are a nice grey colour with no scale, thanks to the soap:

    20190701_143423.jpg

    They then needed to be polished sufficiently so that the colours can be seen clearly when tempering. My tutor told me to be careful not to break them because in this state they are fragile. I made the mistake of putting one into a pin vice to hold it when using the emery paper. It snapped:

    20190701_145133.jpg

    I tempered them by placing them on a bed of brass filings and heating from underneath, to a deep blue:

    20190701_151745.jpg

    I used the broken one as a trial first (bottom of pic). The left hand end got a bit overcooked and turned grey. The middle one was my second attempt. This went a fraction too far at the pinion end but will probably be OK. The final one (top) I got to a pretty uniform blue.

    The final stage was to straighten any which were distorted. The top one was fine but the middle one was out of true. I have more or less got it straight now by some hammering and bending of the pivot with hot pliers.
     
  7. DeanT

    DeanT Registered User

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    Nice work....
     
  8. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Finally got a new arbor to the point where it fits between the plates. This is the fly arbor for the quarter repeat. It still needs polishing and the pivots need shortening. The tempering to blue still allows it to be turned with a graver, but the process is quite slow because the silver steel is pretty hard.

    20190702_102225.jpg
     
  9. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi Nigel,

    Are you using HSS or carbide?

    Regards,

    Graham
     
  10. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Graham

    My gravers are HSS. I am finding I can skim the pivots of the hardened arbors with the graver but doing anything more substantial such as parting off to reduce their length is too difficult. I used a small triangular file instead which worked but I don't think it did the file any good!

    Nigel
     
  11. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi Nigel,

    It's all too easy to burnish instead of cutting, try a carbide graver and see how you get on with it. You'll need a diamond lap or similar to sharpen it.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
  12. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Thanks for the tip. I have just ordered one.
     
  13. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    More goodies in the post this morning: a syringe of diamond paste for pinion polishing, a small steel graver, a carbide graver and a graver honing jig. Early results from the carbide graver are excellent (thanks Graham). Didn't much care of the jig, at least on my large graver. I think it will be more useful for the smaller ones.

    Gravers etc.jpg
     
  14. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Finally sourced some diamond files narrow enough to get between my pinion teeth. These have been effective in removing the burrs, which I should really have done before I hardened them.

    diamond files for pinions.jpg
     
  15. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Another frustrating day. Hardened and tempered another arbor with an integral pinion but bust the pivot trying to straighten it by hammering it too hard and in the wrong place. Third time lucky, I hope.
     
  16. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    How hard are the pinions in the original parts of the clock? I ask only because many period clocks have quite soft iron/steel parts. It seems counterproductive to go to the lengths taken to date unless the original work is done up in a similar fashion. Nice work by the way!
     
  17. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

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    I had been wondering the same.
     
  18. DeanT

    DeanT Registered User

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    I suspect much harder on French than English from the same age but this is a complete guess and someone who actually knows for certain can tell us....
     
  19. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Silver steel heated to cherry red, quenched in brine, then tempered to dark blue gives something pretty hard. I haven't tested the hardness of the original work, but I agree it is probably less hard. My arbor was actually not that far off true; there was no wobble on the pinion and the wheel would have been fine because I will be turning the collet seatings after fitting the collet to the arbor. I was just wanting to get it dead true and my attempt at hammering to straighten (as I have seen in the books) was not initially successful so I ended up overdoing it and mashed the end. Lesson learned!

    My clock class is now closed until September so I can't cut any more pinions until the autumn. In the meantime I am going to look into making the castings. I don't really want to do the casting myself but I will make the models, either in wood or wax. Tiranti's shop (specialist suppliers of tools and materials for sculptors and casters) is only half an hour away by tube so I might drop in for a chat with them. There is also a specialist caster catering mainly for the jewellery trade only a few hundred yards from my home.
     
  20. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    #220 Jim DuBois, Jul 23, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2019
    My exposure to fine English work is a bit limited, but over the last xx years, I have cut a few hundred pinions for clocks, tall clocks, and weight driven wall clocks, some French, Vienna, German, and American shelf wall and bracket clocks, etc. That work has given me a pretty wide exposure to how hard or soft a wide range of pinions/arbors might be. Many have been dead soft, just as they were finished in the clock shop originally. French clocks and Viennas are usually quite hard, but they are the exceptions. I would think that 90% or more of the work I have replicated was soft, and my definition of "soft" is; it files readily, it can be cut with normal shop tooling with ease. I have had some English tall clock parts that were glass hard, or nearly so, but again, very much the exception. A fair number of the earlier arbors and pinions have been of wrought iron, not made of steel.

    I have had very few of the period or quality that Nigel is restoring, so I can't speak to his situation with any great authority.

    I also can report that a couple of the really hard pinions I have replaced were "cut half through" so their hardness did not limit the action of dust and abrasives (and oiled pinions/wheels) in their cases. One of those particular clocks required every pinion and arbor above the great wheels to be replaced as they were all cut deeply. Generally the French clock pinions I replaced were missing a tooth or 2 as a result of a broken spring kickback. i don't recall ever replacing a French pinion due to wear only, at least those low in the train.
     
  21. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    To continue my thoughts in regard to movement repairs and restorations, most of these clocks were built with a less than what we today regard as a precision fit. Often +/- .005" or even .010" is more of the norm in 17th, 18th, and 19th-century work. Making replacement parts to +/-.0005" is more in effort in frustration than a need for good or proper replacement work. The same goes for hardness and tempering IMO. Same with the finishing of parts. A 5 or 10-micron finish on pinion leaves is certainly nice, but at what cost in time and effort and how does that compare with original surfaces?

    Some of the later true regulator clocks from several counties have some really well-executed parts and finishes, and hard pinions, arbors, and pivots, highly polished and very well fit, but that is not the case in very many more conventional 17th-18th century pieces. There are exceptions such as Breguet; most of his work fell into late 18th and early 19th centuries, however.

    Most engineers and really good machinists trained in the last 50 years will set parameters for replacement clock parts that are far more precise than the original parts. And generally unnecessary I think.

    I also tend not to become too concerned about using cast brass versus readily available rolled brass and the like. When properly finished it is nearly impossible to tell one from the other without a lab and a good microscope. I had over 100 wheel blanks cast up 45 years ago. I have perhaps 1/2 of them still. Customers do not want to pay the extra costs of using cast brass when they can't readily tell the difference in the completed project.

    None of this is to cast any dispersion whatsoever on the work being done by Nigel. I am in awe of his renderings and re-conceptualization of the missing parts to his clock. I also admire his dedication to "doing the job right." I am only offering a different view of solutions to the same problem(s).
     
  22. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

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    If you don't deal with much of the early stuff that might explain your view on the brass. I've had awful matches on clocks and it really does stand out.
     
  23. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    There are several ways that can be used to make rolled brass look very much like cast brass, some even under a microscope and very careful inspection.
     
  24. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

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    It's not about crystal structure but alloy colour. You can use tinted lacquers and I've had that done to great effect, particularly on castings like spandrels and handles, but yellow brass for components is much more in keeping than the more coppery looking modern alloys.
     
  25. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Color matching is sometimes difficult. There is a fairly decent range of colors in modern brasses when also considering bronze as alternatives. Here we have 3 colors, all in my bin. The wheels, parts, and smaller plates are yellow phosphor bronze, it is so tough as to not need a bit of hammer hardening or other treatments. The larger plates are yellow brass. The L brackets and the drum are also "brass" but quite red. Always fun to get a reasonable color match.

    IMG_2718.JPG
     
  26. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Back from a long break in Canada and the USA. Once I have delivered on a long overdue commitment to service a neighbour's 19th C single fusee English wall clock, I will be back on this project.

    I have finally tracked down a very similar table clock by the same maker which is currently with a dealer, who has very kindly agreed to my request to inspect it. Off there this afternoon.
     
  27. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    #227 NigelW, Oct 2, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2019
    Inspected the Etherington clock, which was one I had illustrated earlier as it was once with a different dealer who still has images of it. It is the first by this maker I have got close to since buying mine. The quality and finish of the engraving, dial case etc was exceptionally fine, certainly more upscale than mine, and the condition looked to be excellent. The fit in the case was very tight with all the bells on top etc, so I didn't persist in trying to get it out. As a result I was able to see little of the under dial work. However I saw a great deal which was helpful. The layout of the movement (going train, 1/4 repeat on three bells and alarm) was remarkably similar to mine, although the dial is rather different.

    The two biggest puzzles in the reconstruction of the missing parts of mine are the alarm layout and the precise action of the quarter repeat. First the alarm. The clock has a spring barrel on the back plate attached by three lugs in an almost identical manner to that which I concluded mine must have had. In this clock the alarm is wound through the dial but I think mine must have been wound using a string on a pulley at the back. The position of the alarm crown wheel arbor in relation to the spring barrel arbor (above, and slightly to the right when viewed from the back) is also pretty much identical to my reconstruction. This is where the differences end; I had concluded that the alarm crown wheel and arbor had to be just behind the front plate, but here they were just in front of the back plate. The sketch and photo below illustrate how I think it might be laid out (the view inside the plates was restricted so I may not have got it 100% right).

    There appear to be three rivets going through the back plate which hold the two brass blocks required to hold the alarm arbor and crown wheel pivots. There are no corresponding rivet holes in my backplate so I still think it more likely that mine was attached to the front plate, but my reconstruction now seems more complicated than it needs to be in the light of the simplicity of this arrangement. The bell stand is on the opposite plate to the alarm (i.e. the front in this case).

    20191002_081907.jpg Slide1.jpg
     
  28. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

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    on lantern clocks and 30 hour posted frames the crown wheel is sometimes mounted as you show but inside the bridge, which I think makes it a bit easier to make. This is particularly the case when mounted directly on the backplate (which in these clocks would usually be iron.) The ones on the inside usually survive a conversion to anchor escapement in the case of lanterns, the ones on the outside don't.
     
  29. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Re-examining my back plate and the spare holes in it I remain of the opinion that the alarm is more likely to have been on the front plate:

    - there are no rivet holes corresponding to the ones on the fine clock I saw yesterday
    - the candidate threaded hole for the screw securing the top bracket is very close to the one I believe was used for the verge backcock. Any such bracket would therefore have to be on the inside of the plate - a significantly different arrangement.
    - the purpose of the large blocked hole close to the pivot hole for the alarm spring arbor remains uncertain, but I think it could be for a bell stand on the inside of the back plate.

    The front plate is more difficult.

    Slide2.jpg
     
  30. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Quarter Repeat

    Understanding the quarter repeat mechanism properly for the complete Etherington clock would have required a full inspection of the under dial work on the front plate, which I was not able to obtain, but I was able to look between the plates. I took a rather poor photo which I have compared to a similar view from the CAD, although the perspective is different.

    The layout of the train and bell hammers was pretty much identical to my reconstruction, including the leaf spring and the provision of a stop lever engaging on a pin on the second wheel (see fourth picture). The main wheel was crossed out, unlike mine, and had 12 pins instead of six. The pinion on the 2nd arbor had fewer leaves. The main wheel was a very close fit in the space. The pipe is of brass instead of steel and of rather smaller diameter (the alarm arbors visible in the background are also more slender).

    The most surprising and interesting thing was that the clock had an almost identical window in the front plate to mine - a feature which my tutor had never seen. The V lever on the front plate (the left arm of which would engage the quarter snail connected to the clock's motion work) appeared to have a fore and aft L shaped piece on the end of right arm which entered the window (see 5th picture). In my reconstruction I have assumed this would go right through the window and beyond to engage with the snail-like stop on the main arbor, located between the plates (see 6th picture). This was not the case in the complete clock. The L shaped piece did not extend right through, nor was the snail between the plates. This is puzzling. The only thing the window could be doing is acting as some kind of stop to limit the angle of rotation of the V lever, but why cut a window in the plate when the same result could be achieved with a couple of banking pins?

    From what little I could make out, there was some kind of intermediate lever mechanism on the front of the front plate connecting the right arm of the V lever to a snail like stop on the main arbor to the front of the plate, not between the plates, making the sequence of components on the main arbor (from front to back): pulley for spring cord, snail, hour lifting piece (assumed, couldn't see it), front plate, ratchet, main wheel, pipe (brass). Mine currently is hour lifting piece, pulley, front plate, snail, ratchet, main wheel, pipe (steel).

    The sequence of strike was quarters then hours, like in my reconstruction.

    I now have to consider whether to make changes to my design.


    20191001_153400.jpg Screen Shot 2019-10-02 at 15.45.21.png file 1.png file 3.jpg file 4.png file 5.png
     
  31. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Quarter Repeat (Cont'd)

    When observing the clock in action, the V lever seemed to move a fraction when the clock struck the hour without the activation of the quarter strike. Could it be that the the V lever is in permanent contact with the quarter snail on the motion work? This would obviate the need for an unlocking mechanism and associated unlocking angle but I would have thought this would create some unwanted friction in the going train and would require slopes rather than sharp steps on the snail to prevent it jamming. It would also seem to obviate the need to any kind of restriction of the angle of rotation of the V lever, further calling into question the purpose of the window in the front plate.
     
  32. Chris Radano

    Chris Radano Registered User

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    A simple, but expensive solution would be to obtain a clock with a similar movement to examine. There have been a few sold at auctions in the last few months. Sounds like a comment from the peanut gallery, although not my intention. I wonder if taking this next step crossed anyone else's mind like mine :lightbulb::thumb:
     
  33. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Expensive is right unfortunately. A clock of the quality I have just inspected would set me back something like the price of a new Ford F450 truck.
     
  34. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    My poor photograph of the complete Etherington clock I was able to inspect is starting to yield some valuable information. I have make a tracing of the main 1/4 repeat arbor which, although it is in perspective, should allow me to get some pretty good measurements. The interesting constructional features are the use of brass for the pipe, the absence of a collet attaching the main wheel to the pipe (presumably it is riveted to the end of the pipe) and the increased diameter of the arbor near the front plate where again no collet has been used to attach the ratchet, which is presumably riveted onto a step in the arbor. The gap between the ring holding the pipe in place and the back plate has to accommodate both the third wheel in the 1/4 train and the leaf spring for the bottom bell hammer (need to check if it does in my reconstruction). The gap between the front plate and the ratchet/main wheel assembly is sufficient to accommodate the snail in my design, although this would have to be mounted on a collet or attached to the ratchet. All these features can be accommodated in my design. The wheel count seems to be 72, like in my design, but I can't be sure.

    sketch of JCS quarter main arbor.jpg
     
  35. DeanT

    DeanT Registered User

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    Might have to out myself here....I've bought clocks by the same maker for that reason.

    So you're not a complete peanut Chris, although I might qualify for actually doing it.....:emoji_peanuts:

    I'm now an expert in the style of some very obscure makers :screwball:
     
  36. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

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    You probably have the largest collection of Gavelle longcase in the World!
     
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  37. DeanT

    DeanT Registered User

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    Largest and only collection of John Gavelle longcases.

    and Mathew Hill bracket clocks....
     
  38. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

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    oh yes, that's true. I might have the largest collections of John Mercer and Simon Aishe in the World. I did suggest to Nigel you might be able to help.
     
  39. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    #239 NigelW, Oct 5, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2019
    Found pictures of another Etherington clock on line which sold at auction a few years ago, for a handsome sum. Fancy case and dial but the fittings on the back plate don't look right to me. Closer inspection reveals what look like lots of plugged holes on the side of the 1/4 repeat mechanism. If that's what they are, the restorer has clearly gone to great lengths to blend them in by engraving over them. He has also spent time shaping the various cocks, which all look like replacements. The "2" shape is similar to the cocks used on the front plate of mine but I haven't seen it used on the back plate. I think the restorer was trying too hard to make it look authentic but not hard enough to work out what was there originally. I can't decide if the result is dishonest or simply rather misguided. And does it matter?

    Lyon & Turnbull Etherington 2 annotated.jpg Lyon & Turnbull Etherington 1.jpg
     
  40. Chris Radano

    Chris Radano Registered User

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    That's a good question. Does it matter? I think people all have different approaches to restoration. It's what the restorer was trying to achieve...and when we attempt to understand the philosophy of others, that can be tricky.
    I think what you're doing is the best. I hope you can get everything with the repeat sorted. I think you could benefit from a similar donor, not the least benefit would be seeing in person would take away guesswork.
    For restoration, my interpretation is do the best job possible. Any work should be made to look authentic. But also, not to deceive. Blend in the work, but also make it recognizable what work was done. Maybe leave a note in the case detailing the work completed.
    Now the clock you found online, poses a difficult problem. The clock was built originally with repeat work, which was removed (very commonly found). Most people don't even attempt to restore the repeat work. Actually was probably removed because someone else was flummoxed by it. "Do the best job possible", to restore the repeat work is not possible to the vast majority.
    I am affected when I see clocks missing their repeat work. I will not buy them, I think it's too much taken away. I would rather have a clock that never had, than a clock with removed repeat work.
    The clock above, I am not sure I would be comfortable with that solution. I think plugged holes are better than glaring holes in the plates. But I still don't like the plugged holes. Especially if the clock sold for a handsome sum. Intent of deception would have to be considered.
     
  41. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Chris

    I agree with your observations. The function of bracket clocks (or table clocks as they tend to be called these days) has changed over time. Originally intended to be portable around the house (hence the carrying handle and verge escapement) and placed next to the bed at night, they evolved into static timepieces kept on tables or mantlepieces. The pull repeats and alarms therefore became redundant and the accuracy of the anchor escapement became more suitable than the portability of the verge. It is not surprising therefore that these elements were often discarded or altered.

    If I were buying as a collector I would not want a clock which had too much missing or replaced but I specifically wanted a challenging project through which I could learn about clocks of this type and age. Challenging it is certainly proving, but I remain confident that I will eventually prevail. I would quite like to keep the finished clock next to my bed to be used as originally intended.
     
  42. Chris Radano

    Chris Radano Registered User

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    I always thought repeat work were removed due to someone's laziness and ignorance, but as you say also redundancy. As well, maybe financial reasons, as more time and labor would need to be put into maintaining additional components of the clock's movement. It's still not forgivable someone removed repeat work, especially if it was removed later in the clock's life. I assume the removal of repeat work was a practice standard at one time.
    Interesting as well, is the discussion of the intended use of early bracket clocks. As simple timekeepers during day and night. But some grew large in size, and with complicated movements.
    We all know how much our personal devices, or "smart phones" are valued today. But bracket clocks were the closest equivalent to today's "personal devices" during the 17th and 18th centuries. All done with mechanical movements, and stylish cases.
     
  43. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

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    I don't think the early bracket clocks were just transported for day and night though. They cost a King's ransom and they would have been carried from room to room as the guest finished dinner and withdrew to another room.
     
  44. Chris Radano

    Chris Radano Registered User

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    I'm not even sure all of them were transported from room to room. Especially later in the 18th c., they were built in appearance to be portable, but really they stayed in one place!
     
  45. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    I have had several clocks that had plugged plates for any of perhaps several reasons. In some cases it was reasonably obvious that someone had reused a set of old plates in a more recent effort to provide a newer clock. In other cases it seems it is a Chris suggests, laziness on the part of a repairman to take the necessary steps to repair a perhaps unwanted feature. In other cases it may have well been a feature that was more a venture into the light fantastic by the original maker, just showing his skills and innovation, all to provide a feature an owner didn't want or need. In other cases I suspect the original maker may have abandoned a feature after having lost a client/patron who wanted that particular feature or the maker had started making a clock, had laid out the plates, only to discover his current client would not spring for the extra cost. Also, I suspect a lot of these enhancements were no more than the latest fad, some famous maker in London offered it and everybody else then needed to offer it too. No matter the usefulness or lack thereof. I offer the suggestion that minute repeaters were the Tesla's or Bugatti's of the day. Expensive to buy, unnecessary in the gist of things, but something to haul one's ego about? When the rest of society was functioning on time provided by a sun dial, figuratively speaking, is split second precision necessary or even helpful?

    When features cut through engraving and the like, and are later plugged, it suggests a clock was made one way, someone later added a new feature, and a later "restorer" removed it as it didn't belong, or it didn't work, or its owner wanted something else.

    Over here one of the very American clocks is a banjo or more properly called a "patent timepiece" per Simon Willard's 1802 patent. They were time only as originally conceived. Over time it became popular to add an alarm mechanism to them. Also, strike mechanisms were added. The vast majority of the alarms were stripped out in pretty short order, as popularity for both the timepiece and the alarms faded. I have had at least two of them whose plates were drilled out for alarms but were never completed. (The plates show no wear where the plates were drilled for arbors, and mounting screw holes not tapped etc.) I have restored at least 8 or 10 alarm mechanisms to these timepieces and have restored complete strike trains to 2 of the later banjo clocks. In one of those restorations someone had plugged all the holes in the plates, nicely done by the way, yet it was obvious what had been done to those of us who care.

    All in all you have a really interesting clock and it will be even more interesting to see how it all comes out. I love your drawings Nigel! Fantastic!
     
  46. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    I have now refined my design for the main quarter repeat arbor, wheel and ratchet in the light of my recent research (before on the left, after on the right without the pullies and hour lifting wheel). The more slender appearance and crossings out look better I think. The only downside is that the holes on the plates will now need bushing. The size of these holes drove my initial design but it is quite possible that the plates were bushed at some point and the bushings later removed. Ratchet click and spring yet to be added.

    Screen Shot 2019-03-17 at 12.54.55.png Screen Shot 2019-10-10 at 11.30.27.png
     
  47. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Now started to make patterns for the brass castings. I am using model makers' plywood which I am just sticking together with wood glue. I think I will give them a coat or two of gesso (powdered chalk mixed with size) to fill in any gaps, then a light sand. Next step will be to make a silicone rubber mould for making copies in wax which I will then send off to a caster as I don't fancy trying the casting myself. Picture shows backcock (bottom) and part of the bridge for the hour strike lifting lever.

    patterns1.jpg
     
  48. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Two steps forward, one back.

    I have made some more models of the castings and have found someone who can turn them into cast yellow brass for me. They are a bit rough but I have made them slightly oversize both to allow for shrinkage (c. 4% I am told) and tidying up.

    On the downside I have just snapped another 3mm centre drill on a piece of silver steel - a carbide one this time - which feels like ripping up a $10 bill.

    20191019_073651.jpg
     
  49. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Just taken delivery of this magnificent tome. Lots of high res colour photos of clocks by Gretton, a London maker working in the last part of the 17th and early 18th C. Not too many of under dial work unfortunately, but enough to give me some more source material to work on in refining my design of replacement parts.

    20191022_081834.jpg 20191022_081858.jpg
     
  50. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Back to the models for the castings ... I am now making up blanks for the contrate and crown wheels by laminating pieces of ply which I will turn on the lathe and leave overside for final turning in the metal. Crossings out have been roughed in. I will use these areas to drill holes for screws to fix them to a piece of wood fixed to the backplate or held in the four jaw. When turned, I will saw them out before sending for casting.

    20191022_084759.jpg
     

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