1710 Etherington Table clock with lots of bits missing

Discussion in 'Your Newest Clock Acquisition' started by NigelW, Feb 22, 2019.

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  1. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    I didn't have time to cut the pinions this afternoon but I figured out how to do it and started turning my arbors. The milling machine I intend to use has a dividing head with a collet chuck with collet sizes every millimetre starting with 2mm. This is on the right of the horizontal slide and there is a tailstock on the left for supporting the other end of the work (2nd and 3rd pictures). For the 3rd wheel arbor of the quarter repeat I turned some silver steel rod down to 4mm for most of its length, including where the pinion will be, and 2mm beyond the pinion. The 4mm section other than where the pinion is will need to be reduced later but keeping it thicker initially should provide more support (first pic). I intend to mount the arbor in a 4mm collet and support the 2mm end with a half centre, as shown. The nearest Thornton cutter available to cut the 6 leaf pinion is for an 8 leaf, 0.5 module (see first pic). The pinion will need modifying after cutting, which I intend to do by hand filing using the original work as a guide to the required shape and thickness. My tutor suggested it would be a good idea to cut a trial pinion first using a piece of brass rod turned first in the same way as the steel arbor.

    20190520_164805.jpg 20190520_161753.jpg 20190520_161809.jpg
     
  2. DeanT

    DeanT Registered User

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    Hi Graham,

    Yes. Its a great book and describes making a 4 tooth form relieved pinion cutter.

    I also have another couple of books by Porter which describe how to make a 6 tooth cutter which isn't form relieved. They seem much simpler and wondered if they would work as well?

    Cheers
    Dean
     
  3. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    #153 NigelW, May 21, 2019
    Last edited: May 21, 2019
    Doing some more turning of arbors at home today. My Myford ML10, a relatively cheap hobbyist model, is giving a much nicer finish than the professional Shaublin lathe I was using at my club yesterday. The difference I think is that my lathe is barely used, my centres are nice and pointy and everything is still quite tight. The Schaublins are old and have had years of use (and abuse) over the years. The centres are mashed, the slides not exactly square or parallel etc.

    The downside of using the Myford is that it is imperial, as are all my collets (I have managed to assemble a nearly complete second hand set in 1/32" increments but no 1/64ths yet.). Actually I prefer working in imperial but the collets for the milling machine are metric. This is where my Cowells lathe comes in handy - it is entirely metric, but I only have a very limited range of collets. I went online to order some more yesterday but I couldn't see the type I like (B8 Shaublins). Cowells have just pointed out that I was looking in the wrong place and they are still available!
     
  4. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi Nigel,

    A lot of Schaublins have come to their present homes after years of use in production and prototyping shops, and as you say, they've suffered, as any machine would, even fine ones.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
  5. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Not been posting much but I have not been idle. I am focusing on roughing out some of the arbors in silver steel onto which I will cut integral pinions and using this to practice using both my Myford and Cowells lathes as well as the club's Schaublin. In the pic below are (from the left) a piece of unmachined rod for the contrate wheel arbor, the quarter repeat 2nd wheel arbor, 3rd wheel arbor and part roughed out fly arbor. All arbors will need to be thinned further. I am not used to turning things with such small diameters; the Cowells is well suited for this scale but silver steel is tough - I have already broken a couple of centre drills on it (wrong speed I think) - so I am finding it easier to machine in the Myford. The downside (apart from the fact that all my Myford collets are imperial) is that my Myford tailstock centres are so clunky that its hard to get in there with the cutting tool. Malcolm Wild has some nice ideas on pp 108-12 of his Wheel and pinion cutting in horology but some of his homemade gadgets are a bit advanced for me, especially his 2MT tailstock machined to take a rotating bronze carrier which itself is machined to take an 8mm watchmaker's collet. I might try annealing the end of one of my Myford 2MT half centres, making it much smaller, and then rehardening it. My Cowells tailstock takes 8mm collets (I've ordered two more sizes at vast expense) so I am thinking of making some small silver steel centres which can be held in a collet.

    20190524_071420.jpg
     
  6. zedric

    zedric Registered User

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    As someone who has been watching this thread for a while, all I can say is that I never appreciated that there was quite so much work and thought involved in getting a good restoration done. I can see why this level of restoration is so expensive (in time invested), even when the work is not done for remuneration.

    Best wishes for your future endeavours
     
  7. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

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    Quality restoration is definitely expensive! :)
     
  8. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Thank you for your kind thoughts, but I suspect the main reason things are taking me so long is my lack of practical experience and need to build up the right tooling. A seasoned pro could probably knock off these arbors and cut the pinions in a hour or two. It would still be expensive though.

    I first decided to take a class in clock repair after I was quoted what seemed a crazy sum to repair a little Victorian skeleton clock of mine. I succeeded, but not until I had paid two terms' of tuition fees and invested in a modest selection of tools, totalling at least three times the repair cost I had originally been quoted. I now have a bit more respect for good restorers!
     
  9. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    A thought occurred to me during my morning bath (my best thoughts usually do). The Myford tailstock has a 2 MT and is hollow all the way through. It should therefore be possible to mount collets directly into it which could in turn hold a small homemade centre. The Myford collets (now quite rare and expensive) won't work because they require a holder which screws onto the headstock spindle. However a threaded collet and homemade drawbar threaded 3/8" BSW could be just the ticket and these collets are surprisingly cheap at about £10 each - a third of second hand Myford ones and about a sixth of new Bergeon/Schaublin watchmakers' ones.

    Mtc.jpg
     
  10. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    I am finding myself using ER series collets more and more. The #2 MT collets are limited in sizes available hereabouts, while the ER collets are pretty much unlimited. upload_2019-5-24_8-26-57.png
     
  11. DeanT

    DeanT Registered User

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    Probably cost 3 times more but I bet every time you look at the clock it brings a smile and that in itself is priceless.....

    Keep up the good work.
     
  12. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Quite a bit of behind the scenes work over the last few days, practicing the machining of small diameter arbors, grinding new lathe tools, buying some more accessories for my lathes etc. I am about to start some trials using a graver in the lathe - brass first then steel. Hope to start cutting some pinions next week.
     
  13. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Practicing with a graver today. I took the cross slide off the Cowells and mounted the T rest instead. After some false starts I watched some You Tube clips then managed to turn this bit of brass rod down to a fairly smooth an uniform 3.5mm diameter. The T rest is probably a bit wide for this job so I am thinking of making another narrower one. Turning silver steel with the graver will be trickier no doubt but I have made a start.

    20190529_185015.jpg
     
  14. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi Nigel,

    That looks quite respectable. You'll find it easier to position the T rest the right distance away from the work if it's narrower, and brass is exactly where to start learning this skill. With properly sharpened gravers, turning silver steel as it comes from the suppliers will be almost as easy, just let the graver do the work without too much pressure.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
  15. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Made a slightly narrower T rest to fit the Cowells attachment from a piece of mild steel rectangular bar, turning it in the 4 jaw then sawing and filing the rest, which is angled down front the work. Its not as pretty as the Cowells one but it works. Now I can carry on with my graver practice. I am turning the brass to be the right size for one of my pinion arbors and will use it to test the setup of the milling machine before cutting the steel ones. The rod has to be turned accurately so that it will be a snug fit in the collet.

    20190531_182514.jpg
     
  16. DeanT

    DeanT Registered User

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    Hi Nigel,

    Are you cutting the arbour with a graver so you can taper the arbours?

    Cheers
    Dean
     
  17. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    I am keeping the arbors parallel and at an integer number of millimetres to start with so that they will fit into and be gripped by the collets of the milling machine while I am cutting the pinions. Once the pinions are cut I intend to turn the arbors down further to tapers with the graver, possibly between centres. To turn them between centres in the Cowells, which will be more comfortable than doing so in the Myford, I will need to make a carrier to fit into the headstock. I have bought a blank suitable for an 8mm watchmakers lathe which I should be able to convert into one. This will be much cheaper than buying something like this:

    176630_pic1_cmyk_m400.jpg
     
  18. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    #168 NigelW, Jun 3, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2019
    Two steps forward, one step back..

    My first attempt at pinion cutting was a mixed success. This was the setup on my club's milling machine (apologies for the poor foucs):

    20190603_153055.jpg

    The cutting process on the trial brass blank went pretty well, but the nearest Thornton cutter was for a 0.5 module, 8 leaf pinion, and I need six leaves. The resultant pinion shape was not great as a consequence. Another poor picture, but this illustrates the problem. The brass trial pinion has much fatter leaves than the original 1710 steel one, and they are not curved at the top.

    20190603_161709.jpg

    Some or all of this could be corrected by hand filing but I need to cut four six leaf pinions at or about this module. I decided not to proceed to cutting my steel pinions but to investigate getting a more appropriate cutter instead. Malcolm Wilde recommends going down half a module for making replacement wheels for old clocks so perhaps a 0.45 module cutter would be better?
     
  19. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    To be more precise, Wilde recommends going down half a module for making replacement pinions for old clocks. I have now ordered the 0.45 module, 6 leaf pinion cutter for about a quarter of the price of my recent long case clock (but a rather smaller fraction of the cost of this one).
     
  20. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    While waiting for my new pinion cutter to arrive I have been making a carrier chuck for my Cowells. I bought a blank 8mm watchmakers' mandrel and have roughed out the shape. In the meantime a second hand watchmaker's dog has arrived in the post. Just need to drill and tap the holes for the driving arm and I will able to turn arbors between centres.

    20190604_182315.jpg
     
  21. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    More toolmaking today - turning a drawbar to enable me to fit collets into the tailstock of my Myford. 2 MT collets are available fairly cheaply with a 3/8" Whitworth internal thread for engaging with the drawbar. 3/8" Whitworth is 16 tpi so I should be able to cut this with my backgear, which will save me having to buy a die. With tailstock collets in both the Myford and Cowells lathes I will be able to make and use an interchangeable set of small centres and runners suitable for turning small arbors, polishing pivots etc.

    20190605_202635.jpg

    Also been thinking about how to make the spring for the quarter repeat. This would no doubt have been forged before finishing with a file, but not having the skill or equipment I feel that milling it from a solid piece of gauge plate, then filing, then bending would be a better approach for me.

    Etherington clock 1:4 repeat spring.png
     
  22. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Finished my tailstock drawbar, after a struggle. The 3/8" Whitworth thread was much more difficult to cut than I had expected (it's only the second time I have used the screwcutting function on the lathe) and the final result is quite rough, but it works. I slowed the lathe right down so as not to run into the larger diameter part of the bar, but the quality of cut was poor and then I had great difficulty getting it to engage with the female thread in the back of the collet (above in picture). Reading my ML10 manual after the event it seems that Whitworths need to be shaped with a chaser after cutting to get the correctly rounded hollows and peaks. I turned the outer thread diameter down a fraction instead to get it to fit.

    20190606_195453.jpg
     
  23. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Between the rounded tops and bottoms and the 55 degree angles you did pretty well to get it to work I suspect.

    Types-of-thread-profiles.jpg
     
  24. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    The only other time I used the screwcutting function on my Myford was to replace a double ended bolt on my 350 year old lantern clock whose thread had been so badly stripped it no longer held (it was on a top corner - one end threaded into one of the turned columns and the other into a corner finial, passing through and securing the top plate in the process). The thread was completely non-standard in pitch and profile but I managed to assemble a combination of change wheels to get the right pitch. I later modified the profile by hand filing until it fitted.
     
  25. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    My Thornton 0.45 module six leaf pinion cutter has arrived.

    20190608_162556.jpg

    Comparing its profile to one of the original 1710 six leaf pinions it looks pretty good (it's not completely lined up in this photo). The original is cut a little deeper but if necessary I can remove a bit with a file afterwards.

    20190608_163108.jpg

    I will cut another trial pinion in brass at my class on Monday and if all goes well will move on to cutting the actual ones in steel.
     
  26. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Successfully cut three six leaf pinions this afternoon with my new Thornton cutter. The arbor shanks need to be turned down further but I wanted to keep them as thick as possible while cutting the pinions. The leaves are slightly fatter than the 1710 ones because I was erring on the side of caution. I will see how well they engage with the wheels, which I will cut next, and if necessary I will file the pinion leaves down a fraction.

    20190610_200228.jpg 20190610_200215.jpg 20190610_200149.jpg
     
  27. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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  28. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Just found this image of the under dial work of an early 18th C Quare movement (Lot 107, London 19th June 2019).

    Haven't worked out how it all fits together, but it clearly shows the way the leaf spring engages, via a cord, with the main 1/4 repeat arbor. It also shows that the 1/4 snail must behind the motion work wheel and must be quite thin - a conclusion I had come to about mine was was not certain about.

    I think this mechanism is designed to strike the hours first, then the quarters - mine is the other way round - because there is a lever (going diagonally up from left to right) which seems to engage at one end with the hour rack and at the other, through a window in the plate, with a warning pin on one of the quarter repeat wheels.

    Quare clock Bonhams Jun 19.jpg
     
  29. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

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    you can't use that pic without permission from the copyright holder, or at all while the auction is still current. It is an interesting auction though.Striking the hours first and then the quarters is an unusual format.
     
  30. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Whoops! Will bear that in mind in future. I can't now edit the post.
     
  31. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    I am nearly there with my set-up for turning the arbors, but am not yet 100% happy.

    My homemade carrier is finished but my tailstock centre is too large, so I think I will make a smaller half centre to fit into a collet in the tailstock. Furthermore, I think I will need female centres later when forming the pivots, which will mean altering or making a new carrier (I have some more blank 8mm watchmakers' mandrels on order). I don't have a travelling steady; I suspect I may need one but am not sure.

    20190611_105809.jpg
     
  32. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    I have not found a traveling steady to be necessary for reducing arbors to their needed diameters. A sharp tool with good relief and taking shallow cuts have worked fine for me. At least a couple of these in the photo have been reduced to near finished size. I tend to leave the arbor steel full diameter until the teeth are cut. And I also support both ends but I generally do not find it necessary to cut them between centers. The headstock end on my wheel and pinion cutter uses ER series collets and their accuracy is better than mine. Between centers, like you are doing, is a more accurate method for certain. I have found the rigidity of the workpiece also important while cutting so I tend to cut the teeth close to the point of the collets grasp also. The photos show my old machine which uses 3C collets and I am using flood coolant, obviously. Since then I have evolved to a more modern machine and now also use a "MicroMist" which is a much cleaner method of providing cooling and lubrication of the work. Just FYI. I like what you are doing and your drawings and reengineering of the movement are exceptional. I wish I had your skill in drawing/CAD work!

    IMG_0834.JPG IMG_0554.JPG IMG_0553.JPG
     
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  33. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Jim your advice about rigidity is well made!

    On the basis that "mistakes are good", I had a good day today. First I broke one of my arbors then I came to the conclusion that my pinions were not cut deep enough and need redoing.

    The accident with the arbor was down to my stupidity. I was trying to cut a taper by eye using the two screw controls on the cross slide and got the tool stuck in one of the residual grooves from the pinion cutting operation. On the next attempt I held the arbor much more firmly in a collet and carefully machined away all the grooves before trying anything fancy, like cutting a taper. I then used the graver to practice taper cutting by hand.

    20190611_184118.jpg
     
  34. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Contemplating my setbacks yesterday, I am coming round to the view that I need some facility at home to cut wheels and pinions. The problem with relying on the set up at my clock club is that I am only there for a narrow window each week so there is a long turnaround time for correcting any mistake. Furthermore at home I can take my time and familiarise myself better with my tools. (My club will remain invaluable for other things, especially the guidance and advice from my tutor and other members, some of whom are highly experienced professional machinists.)

    The question is what kit to buy. My workshop is tiny and I already have two lathes. A milling machine would be nice, but I am leaning towards the wheel and pinion cutting attachment for my Cowells. The downside is that it is not designed for use with electronic dividing so one would have to buy or make division plates or work out a way of adapting it. The advantage is that is won't take up much room, and in any case I have the backup of my club's equipment for doing large or exoticly numbered wheel counts.

    Wp1.jpg
     
  35. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    #185 Jim DuBois, Jun 12, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2019
    I am not a fan of using a Cowells lathe for wheel and pinion cutting. Why? Lack of ridigity, too small a work envelope, no way to support outboard ends of pinion arbors, the lever feed is cumbersome if used, screw feed requires a lot of cranking, very limited in sizes of wheels that can be cut, and so forth. Also, delivering power to the milling head requires some compromises, or at least it did on mine back when. I owned my Cowells for 20 years, bought it new with most all their accessories, and very seldom used it for anything other than pivot polishing and the like. Why? Nice lathe but I found all the limitations mentioned more than dulled my interests in using it. Better solutions, for my purposes, were found in short order.

    What I did was to buy a Sherline mill and I also bought a Sherline headstock, bed, and tailstock that I mounted on the mill table. I originally made a 120:1 worm gear reduction index assembly that I installed on the lathe headstock. I fit it with index plates I made as necessary. Within a very short period of time I mounted a stepper motor on the assembly and used CNC for indexing, also fit a stepper on the X axis of the mill for automation of the cutting process. I could and did cut wheels up to about 5" using this method, as well as some fair number of pinions up to maybe 3/4" dia. I also cut some pinions as small as .075" dia .and crown / escape wheels as small as .375". So, my point is, it would cut both small and larger work reasonably well.

    Jerry Keiffer has set up a Sherline mill with the CNC rotary and has shown it multiple times here on some tool threads. And his work speaks pretty much for itself. I am not trying to sell Sherline stuff, they just offer some reasonably priced and can be very well accessorized.

    So, here are some of my make-do solutions from a long time ago. The 120:1 Sherline headstock and lathe bed/tailstock I later used on a larger CNC mill, the Derbyshire Model A lathe is built just like a jewelers lathe only 2X the size. Did it work well for wheel cutting but pinions? Not so much, no outboard support and the like.

    I offer this stuff for your perusal, I have found how to "get it wrong" a number of times. Given your interests and skills, I suspect you will find a good solution for your purposes.

    Scan0091.JPG Oct15_02.jpg Oct15_01 10.jpg IMG_2450 (Large).JPG IMG_2446.JPG IMG_1438.JPG IMG_1437.JPG Scan0018.JPG wheel cutter sherline.jpg IMG_1819.JPG
     
  36. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi Nigel,

    Based on costs alone, you could probably acquire a Sherline mill and CNC indexer with some basic tooling for about the same price as the Cowells RG85 wheel and pinion attachment, and end up with a more versatile machine.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
  37. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    I don't know the prices on Cowells or Sherlines today, but in about 1992 I bought two Sherline mills, two Sherline lathes, and a decent selection of accessories for less than I paid for the Cowells with accessories 4 years earlier.
     
  38. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Lots of good advice, thank you. I have to say that I find my Myford more comfortable to use than the Cowells - it has more power and the slides are easier to operate - but the Cowells seems good for the small scale stuff, especially when using a graver.

    I understand the point abut power and rigidity. The Shirline seems a good option, especially since I don't have a drill stand. The choice of machine and accessories is somewhat bewildering however. The cheaper mills seem only to have vertical spindles, but the 2000 series seems more adaptable and a horizontal mill would seem a better choice for wheel and pinion cutting. Then there is the question of how to hold the work. I suppose the options are a headstock plus tailstock with a worm gear type dividing system plus index plates or stepper motor, or a rotary table plus vertical mount plus tailstock plus stepper motor and electronic indexing. I will try to find Jerry's posts to get a better idea.
     
  39. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    #189 NigelW, Jun 12, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2019
    Found one picture. This looks good for wheel cutting, but for pinions more support will be needed I think.

    306778-jpg.jpg

    For pinion cutting a setup like this perhaps? The cutter is rotating on the vertical axis here, which seems a little more awkward that if it were horizontal.

    13-0.jpg
     
  40. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Yes, both approaches are useful for cutting wheels. I like the approach seen in the drawing as it works better for me for pinion cutting as we have already beat about sufficiently. It is the method I used, and still use today but in my case with a larger machine. The only real problem with that method is the cutting action occurs where we can see the least of it. But I still have that problem with my much larger machine. I have tried cutting on the front side but it seems cumbersome and tends to eat up some of the available space needed for our work.

    IMG_1124.JPG
     
  41. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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  42. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

    Jan 2, 2015
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    I've been doing a bit more research and some arithmetic.

    A new Shirline rotary table (which looks like a good bit of kit) with stepper motor and electronic controller plus an angle plate and chuck adapter will be about £800, presumably before VAT but the price list is not clear, or about £1,000 in total.

    A new Shirline 5000 mill package with some extras comes in at about £1,000 (£1,200 with VAT?) - say a total of about £2,400 to allow for a few more extras, including a tailstock etc. The Cowells vertical mill, which looks more robust than the Shirline and appears to have a motor with twice the power (125W compared to 60W), is around two and a half times the price, but it is also smaller and the head can't be rotated it would seem. The Cowells set up below looks quite neat (with a mounting block for the lathe tailstock) but their dividing head is not available with any adaptation for a stepper motor. I guess it might be possible to mount the Shirline rotary table onto the Cowells?

    So a new 100% Shirline set up would cost c. £2,400 vs a Shirline/Cowells one at about £5,000. Is it worth paying the extra, given that I am a beginner? It may not be. A brief search for second hand prices hasn't yielded much. I suspect the Cowells machines don't come up that often

    V-MillPinion6.JPG
     
  43. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi Nigel,

    The UK dealers for Sherline, Millhill, do include VAT in their online price lists, so for example, a 5400A mill 'deluxe' package (or 5410A metric) comes in at just over £1000, and if you add in the 8700 CNC controlled rotary table and a 3 jaw chuck you still have a little change from £2000. (I've been considering this setup for a while, hence my interest).

    Regards,

    Graham
     
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  44. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Thanks Graham - it was the Millhill price list I was looking at.

    I have a three and a four jaw chuck for my Cowells lathe. These are threaded 14 M whereas the rotary table seems to have a female 3/8 Whitworth thread, but adapters are available for less than £10. I have never used a rotary table and am a little surprised it doesn't have a Morse taper or something similar to take collets, which are more accurate than chucks. An ER collet adapter is an option I suppose but my attempt to fit ER collets to my Myford was not a success as the set up turned out not to be very accurate, forcing me to search out and buy (at a price) second hand Myford ones. A four jaw plus dial indicator and lots of tweaking is always an option where accuracy is needed I guess.
     
  45. DeanT

    DeanT Registered User

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    Yeap Jim. Its past staggering....and he's extremely helpful and nice.

    I guess if he can do that on Sherline machine then it shows that machine is suitable for most tasks.
     
  46. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    I am not certain the comparison of motor capacity cited is comparing apple to apples. I have used the Sherline headstocks and motors with their speed controls for a number of other purposes. They are quite stout and they are rated at 180 watts for intermittent use, 60 watts continuous.

    Then there is a matter of bearings in the headstocks. Mine had cone/sleeve bearings. Sherline uses ball bearings. I have read that cone bearings are more susceptible to issues when subjected to heavy side loads, like when milling etc. I never had any issues with my Cowells lathe, but I only used it as a lathe, and then not all that much. I have abused the Sherline headstocks by running them much higher RPM's, as well with a number of heavy loads.

    Attached are photos of my using the Sherline motor assemblies for some other purposes. They can be made reversible with the simple addition of a DPDT switch, there is ample room in the controller box to do so. I have not found the Sherine motor lacking in power for any of my rather diverse purposes. The controller is superb.

    I am beginning to sound like a commercial for Sherline, not my intent. I just find them an excellent solution for a lot of the work I have needed to be done for several purposes, and their price point stateside is attractive. I just bought a surplus CNC lathe by Spectralight (Light Machines) that uses all Sherline lathe parts, so I am back with their products once again.

    IMG_1133.JPG derby 2.jpg IM000369.JPG IM000366.JPG ROBOTS AND CONTROLS AND LATHE AND MILL 007.jpg
     
  47. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Jim

    Your insight into these machines is invaluable, thank you. Although I like the idea of the Cowells machine (they look pretty and are made near my home town in England) my head is telling me to go for the Shirline.

    Nigel
     
  48. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Jun 14, 2008
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    There is a lot to like about the Cowells products. They are robust, and certainly more purpose-built for clockmaking and other small mechanical work than say WW or Lorsch style lathes. I bought and sold (and used many) small lathes and mills for several years in my spare time, so I formed at least some of my opinions and prejudices firsthand. And you are welcome for any assistance I may have provided.
     
  49. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

    Jan 2, 2015
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    Once more unto the breach...

    My next pinion to be cut on Monday at the club. I have machined this blank much more carefully using 4mm silver steel stock, taking the thin end down to near the finished diameter with a clean shoulder to the pinion so I can get a better view of the profile while cutting (I must get my better camera back into operation - I can't get the phone to focus properly).

    20190613_171648.jpg
     
  50. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

    Jan 2, 2015
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    Experimented with an improvised wax chuck yesterday. First I turned a piece of aluminium rod held in the three jaw

    IMGP1950.JPG

    I attached the blank using some furniture restorer's shellac stick after heating the chuck with a miniature hand-held blowtorch, centring it and pressing it in with the tailstock centre

    IMGP1951.JPG

    Successfully managed to the turn the face of the disc (a replacement slip washer for a different clock)

    IMGP1953.JPG

    Even managed to mount the disk off centre for drilling out the second hole.

    IMGP1954.JPG

    The test was not fully satisfactory however. The shellac was too thick in parts resulting in the brass disc being not completely flat against the chuck, giving an uneven thickness when I first turned it. This could be down to using the wrong kind of shellac, not heating it adequately, not pressing the blank in firmly enough or a combination of the three. I know many people advocate superglue instead these days but I don't like the stuff! This You tube video is what I was trying to emulate. The shellac looks much thinner than the one I was using:

     

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