1710 Etherington Table clock with lots of bits missing

Discussion in 'Your Newest Clock Acquisition' started by NigelW, Feb 22, 2019.

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  1. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    #1 NigelW, Feb 22, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2019
    Just bought this at auction as a long-haul restoration project. Initial euphoria has morphed (via a brief spell of near panic about the scale of the task) into a serious desire to get cracking.

    Main problems as far as I can see are:

    The quarter repeat mechanism is missing
    The verge escapement has been replaced with an anchor
    The alarm mechanism is largely missing and what remains looks odd
    Not sure if the pendulum rise and fall mechanism is right (never seen anything quite like it)
    The fusee ratchets looked pretty mashed up
    The fusee have chains, which would be rare for the date if they are original.

    Not taken it apart yet (I want to show it to the tutor at my clock club first) so there may be more horrors (or possibly delights) awaiting me, but before doing any work I need to do some research to establish, based on the empty holes in the plates, what might have been there originally. I suspect it would have had a pull quarter repeat on three bells plus alarm, the latter possibly wound through the odd looking hole next to the 60 in the chapter ring (a number of Etherington clocks seem to have oddly placed alarm winding holes).

    I am going to need all the help I can get with this one so any advice or pointers would be most welcome!

    Screen Shot 2019-01-29 at 11.06.09.png 52281264_10156240324413473_243682176493682688_o.jpg?_nc_cat=110&_nc_ht=scontent.flhr3-1.jpg 52602243_10156240333013473_4032734872287051776_o.jpg?_nc_cat=108&_nc_ht=scontent.flhr3-1.jpg 52598907_10156240316028473_3426348823679598592_o.jpg?_nc_cat=100&_nc_ht=scontent.flhr3-2.jpg 52420955_10156238795728473_112774145997012992_o.jpg?_nc_cat=106&_nc_ht=scontent.flhr3-2.jpg 79deb9fc8eb5c6dc7692a5f3d1f753aa.png
     
  2. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

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    DeanT is our resident expert on bracket clocks, particularly of this age.

    I don't recall seeing that one at auction. It's quite a project if you are going to restore all the original functionality. It is an attractive clock apart from the hole in the chapter ring.
     
  3. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    It came up at Dreweatts in Newbury, UK.
     
  4. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

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    ah, I even have the catalogue for that! Someone I know had 22 lots in the sale but that wasn't one of them.

    Just looked it up, very nice.
     
  5. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Two other Etherington clocks have oddly placed winding holes - presumably for the alarm - but neither seems as ill placed as on mine. The hole goes right through the front plate. The first of the two clocks below was sold at Bonhams recently. It is a single train quarter repeater with alarm and verge escapement. I looked at it and it seemed complete but I didn't get a good enough look to see if the verge was original. It sold for quite a bit more.

    80bf4e3198b01fe297a7b98b2a6172d4.jpg 6c21a4c23414a17cb5a0e2d6a7acf3cd.jpg
     
  6. P.Hageman

    P.Hageman Registered User

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    It would be a very nice project to bring it back to its "original" state, although I think from what I can see from the pictures, the going train has a lot of "new" parts gotten in its live. The pinions look much younger then the age of the clock. Love to see detailed pictures of the wheelwork once it is taken apart. Its a nice looking clock!
     
  7. DeanT

    DeanT Registered User

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    I love that clock and spent a long time looking at it before the auction before deciding I didn’t need another project.

    What a great clock to spend hours researching and then making the missing parts. Having a clock of that quality to restore will certainly ensure the standard of your workmanship remains extremely high as you will have to keep true to Etherington’s original!

    Etherington was a top quality maker and master of clockmakers company if my memory serves me correctly.

    I’ll have a look through my books and see if I have photos of similar clocks and post what I find.

    Please please please post lots of photos so we can enjoy the process as well!
     
  8. DeanT

    DeanT Registered User

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    First place i'd look is in "Hobson's Choice" to see if you can find similar quarter repeating or similar movement. Unfortunately, there are no Etherington clocks in the book as I looked.

    Cheers
    Dean
     
  9. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    I agree that all of the going train other than the fusee and great wheel assembly looks like a replacement. I haven't included a photo of the striking train, but the wheels in that have much finer crossings out and a decorative circle just in from the teeth. The going train wheels by contrast are less refined and the pinons also look different as you say. I am guessing that this is pretty standard on a verge to anchor conversion where the gear ratios and overall configuration is rather different. In my 1680s lantern clock the entire going train was a replacement.
     
  10. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Dean

    Thanks for the support and encouragement. A couple of Etherington clocks are illustrated in Percy Dean's Early English clocks and there are a few other images online. My interest in this maker was sparked by the single train clock I saw at the recent Bonham's sale, which I thought was very sweet, but it wasn't knackered enough to merit mucking about with. This one is in need of so much tlc that I feel emboldened to have a go. I have never worked on a clock of this type or quality before so I am going to take it slowly. As a member of the Epping Forest Horology Centre I have access to a good workshop and an excellent tutor who is highly knowledgeable about clocks of this period. The most valuable clock I have worked on to date is a 1680s lantern clock which I bought unrestored from Brian Loomes. I had commissioned him to find me a clock by one of the Swinnerton brothers of Newcastle under Lyme from whom I am descended.

    I will certainly post pics and updates.

    Nigel
     
  11. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Wasn't aware of this book but have now ordered one. It is exactly what I was looking for - Thanks!
     
  12. jmclaugh

    jmclaugh Registered User

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    Lovely bracket clock and well worth restoring as far as it is possible to. There are a couple of bracket clocks by him shown in Early English Clocks and the backplate of one of them, it has very similar engraving and cartouche for the name (page 407), neither have unusual holes in the chapter ring. The movement has a rise and fall and pull cord quarter repeating mechanism, the rise and fall mechanism is described in the book as it is unusual. HTH and good luck.
     
  13. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Just been searching the archive of the AHS and have found some tantalising pictures of a rectangular dial table clock by the same maker from a 1974 edition of Antiquarian Horology - far too grainy online to really see clearly but very interesting nevertheless. The first shows the top of the case with associated finals and handles. The auctioneer's description of the state of the case was not very encouraging but it seems to me (as a rank newbie I freely admit) that mine ain't too bad. The brassware looks almost identical and the overall design shows an admirable restraint, which is one of the things which attracted me to this maker.

    The back view shows a pendulum rise and fall mechanism and gives a clue about how the pendulum might have related to it. My rise and fall is much clunkier but the engraving, to my uneducated eye, suggests it might be OK unless the bits have been repurposed. On mine the rise and falls cuts into the pillar just behind the front plate and would seem to get in the way of the quarter bells, which I why I am still not sure about it.

    The side views show a chain fusee which the author does not comment on. He says that Etherington was influenced by Tompion, and Tompion used chains so I guess it could be OK. The fusees themselves have square-bottomed grooves. Gut lines would have had round-bottomed grooves so if the chains are later I guess the fusees themselves would have had to be replaced or altered.

    The three bells and their hammer arbors are clearly visible and the arbors are just where the line of three empty holes are on my plates. A better resolution picture (I will look up the original printed copy) may give me a clearer idea of the positioning of the wheels and fly of the repeat train which I can then try to correlate with my plate holes.

    Finally there is the odd patching up of the dial in the 1974 illustration. At some point, a large hole was cut in the dial corresponding in this case to the bottom right subsidiary dial (showing day of the week) and then patched up. My clock only has two subsidiary dials, both at the top. The right hand one is for the rise and fall like in the 1974 illustration, but the left one, described as a residual alarm dial, has a very similar large hole. The centre of this dial, whose engraving looks brighter but less well executed than the one on the right, is not part of the plate but the front of a rotating drum to which the the silvered ring is attached. This is puzzling.

    Screen Shot 2019-02-24 at 08.26.33.png Screen Shot 2019-02-24 at 08.25.23.png Screen Shot 2019-02-24 at 08.25.16.png Screen Shot 2019-02-24 at 08.25.05.png Screen Shot 2019-02-24 at 08.50.12.png
     
  14. DeanT

    DeanT Registered User

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    I've got a full set of those magazines. Which edition is it in?
     
  15. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Volume 8 No 8 September 1974, front cover and pp. 851-3
     
  16. DeanT

    DeanT Registered User

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    The original photos in the magazine are tiny which is why there isn't much detail in digital ones you have obtained.
     
  17. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Thanks for looking them up. I can get to the Guildhall Library quite easily from where I live so I might pop in to just to see if I can glean any more.
     
  18. DeanT

    DeanT Registered User

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    To be honest I can see more in your photos than the magazine. Interesting article. "Poor mans Tompion" as he describes it! That's fine company to be keeping.
     
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  19. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

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    I'm learning a lot about bracket clock cases from talking to the cabinet maker. The veneer is usually fruitwood and ebonised, your case looks of the right form though I am not familiar with that construction on the side. Dean will be more familiar with the various construction methods.

    Perhaps you could provide some more case photographs.

    If you need a case restorer we can point you in the right direction.
     
  20. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Most helpful, thank you. I will be showing the clock and case to my clock tutor tomorrow for his opinion and will take some more photo then.
     
  21. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    #21 NigelW, Feb 25, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2019
    Took the dial off at my clock class today and spent nearly two hours discussing the clock with my tutor.

    Some initial observations:

    - Both sides of the front plate, the plate edges and the inside of the back plate have been worked over at a later date with something like a Water of Ayr stone, which is a shame, as any original layout marks have been eliminated
    - Some of the under dial components are clearly not original, in particular the wheel which drives the date ring (vertically below the centre arbor), the lifting pice which engages with the pin on the motion work minute wheel and the strike/silent lever
    - The hour pipe looks as if it has been repurposed from another clock because it has two holes for connecting to a snail - unnecessary here because the snail is connected to a separate star wheel
    - The motion work wheel has some extra holes in it suggesting that the quarter snail was once attached to it
    - The large circular hole in the top left of the dial may be Ok. My tutor thinks the whole alarm wheel occupying this hole would have rotated in synch with the hour hand which would have required a train of gears to connect it with the hour pipe (yet to be worked out in detail). The alarm itself, he thinks, would have comprised a wheel similar to a verge escapement crown wheel, mounted vertically inside the front plate, which would have acted on a pair of hammers inside the hour bell. There would have been space for this with the original verge going train, but not with the anchor. Was the power from a barrel wound through the oddly placed hole in the chapter ring?
    - We think we have located the pivot holes for the quarter repeat train and fly but there was much puzzling over the likely power source for the quarter repeat. A mini spring barrel on one of the plates on the axis of the wheel with the hammer pins would require some kind of bridge yet the plate holes don't seem to support this. Our working hypothesis is that there may instead have been a large single leaf spring attached to an empty hole near the bottom right of the front plate.
    - The relationship between the top two pillars and the rise and fall on the right and the alarm on the left is extremely awkward and badly thought through, yet there are no obvious signs that the dial and movement may not have started off life together (there are no spare or filled holes in the front plate for a differently configured dial. The relationship between the date ring and the top chapter ring pillar is also extremely awkward (it has sheared off) yet the date ring and its engraving all look OK.
    - The verge appears to have been attached to the back plate rather then the front plate.

    One of my next tasks will be to map and record carefully all the holes in both plates with a view to narrowing down the design possibilities.

    Back of dial.jpg Dial with alarm work removed.jpg Some under dial components.jpg Alarm dial.jpg under dial work.jpg Front plate with most of motion work etc removed.jpg
     
  22. DeanT

    DeanT Registered User

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    #22 DeanT, Feb 25, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2019
  23. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

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    That's a lot of brassworm!

    I'm very surprised about the cutout for the subsidiary, is that the usual approach?
     
  24. DeanT

    DeanT Registered User

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    Like a jigsaw puzzle without the pieces.
     
  25. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Just counted the number of teeth on the alarm wheel: 94 (47 x 2).
     
  26. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    #26 NigelW, Feb 26, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2019
    The strange number of teeth in the alarm wheel might make things easier for me in working out the link to the going train. Unless there is a 94 or 47 tooth in the motion work somewhere, the 94 wheel can only sensibly engage with another of the same number of teeth (my current hypothesis) or with a wheel which is a different multiple of 47. When I have properly mapped all the holes in the plates (I am thinking of drawing up the plates in CAD) it should just be a process of elimination. It seems to me not impossible that there may have been another wheel attached to the hour pipe (there are two unused holes, which I had assumed might be for an hour snail and hence from a different clock). The wheel connecting the hour pipe to the the date ring is new.
     
  27. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Initial thoughts on configuration of alarm and quarter repeat, based on my discussions yesterday with my tutor. The alarm crown type wheel and hammers would be between the plates.

    Slide1.jpg
     
  28. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

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    my alarms have a single double headed oscillating hammer flicked back and forth by the verge pallets on the crownwheel. How does a double hammer work? I've looked at quite a few that use the same system. I only have two, both a decade od two after your clock, but both are gravity driven.
     
  29. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    I have never worked on an alarm mechanism before so I am not very far advanced with my understanding. My sketch was based on an illustration from a book my tutor showed me in the club library, which I have to admit I didn't fully digest. Mine could be a singe double headed hammer like yours.
     
  30. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

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    Alarms are not all that common in English clocks except for lanterns. I have one in a longcase and one in a lantern. You do see them in Comtoise/morbier clocks a lot and the same oscillating double ended hammer is used there. The thing all these gravity driven clocks have in common compared to brackets is that they have much bigger bells. It may be the twin hammer system is for smaller bells struck on the outside.
     
  31. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi Nick,

    It's exactly the same as a verge escapement, the crown wheel drives the flags on the hammer arbor alternately. Some repeaters use a similar mechanism to govern the striking speed.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
  32. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

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    that's one arbour, like mine though, how do you work two hammers? Pegs on the arbour acting on separate hammers?
     
  33. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Found some images of an Etherington clock with a three bell repeat using a leaf spring on the font plate. Although this is earlier than mine this could be the general configuration. So far I have counted 43 unused holes in the front plate and 31 in the back. I am coming round to the view that the verge must have been attached to the front plate because there are so many more holes there. How the alarm wheel was connected to the hour wheel remains a mystery as I can see no spare hole or post close enough to the centre.

    DSC_0020.jpg DSC_0021.jpg
     
  34. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi Nick,

    I guess one way would be two crown wheels on the same arbor, each driving their own hammer arbor.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
  35. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    #35 NigelW, Feb 26, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2019
    I think I have more or less solved the alarm wheel drive issue. Looking again at the alarm dial, although the numbering of the hours is anticlockwise, the wheel needs to go round clockwise because the numbers are read as they go past a fixed point.

    Measuring the spare holes more carefully, I have found a suitable candidate for a pivot (or more likely a post) which is equidistant from both the alarm wheel centre and the centre arbor. This is unlikely to be a fluke, and the only question is whether the wheels will fit. The centre wheel needs to be the same diameter as the alarm wheel and the intermediate wheel can have whatever number of teeth it needs to fit as the ratio doesn't matter. So long as the centre wheel is higher than the motion work bridge and the rack pivot (which it needs to be to be in the same plane as the alarm wheel) it will just fit. The only fly in the ointment is the pin which moves the date work at the back of the dial, which it will foul as currently configured. However, there is a solution which is to raise the driving train for the date so that it is above the wheel driving the alarm. This will mean altering the hour pipe (I had my doubts about it before for other reasons), increasing the height of the post for the date driving wheel and altering or remaking the date driving wheel, both of which look quite new and may well post-date the abandonment of the alarm mechanism.

    An afterthought: there are some further implications of this solution. The first is whether the various levers and lifting pieces for the strike will clear the post on which the intermediate alarm drive wheel is located. Currently it looks as if they don't, but the piece which gets in the way is one which I already suspected was not old. The second question concerns the rather unsightly hole in the chapter ring which I suspected was for winding the alarm. I need to do some more measurements but it looks like it just clears the wheel. Could this lend weight to the idea that aspects of the clock were a bit experimental and did not come out quite to the high standards that Ethers might have liked? Alternatively it could point to it being a bit of a lash-up.

    Slide2.jpg Alarm dial.jpg
     
  36. DeanT

    DeanT Registered User

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    How does the spring and brass lever which sits in the cutout on the front plate work?
     
  37. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    That's a very good question! I am still waiting for my copy of Hobson's Choice to arrive so I can't claim to be too familiar with quarter repeat mechanisms yet, but my understanding is that the steel spring on the front plate provides the driving force for the quarter striking. Its rest position is sticking out (as shown). There is an arm on the back connected to the quarter pin wheel arbor. When the repeat cord is pulled the arm rotates the arbor. On the front of the clock is a pulley on the same arbor with a second cord attached to the top of the spring (visible in the front view) so as the arm rotates, the spring is drawn in. When the spring is close to being fully tensioned it will engage with the brass lever, which I assume will in turn release the repeat train. If I am right, this will ensure that the quarter striking can only be released when the spring is fully wound, thereby preventing it going off without sufficient power, which could be an incomplete repeat.

    DSC_0018.jpg DSC_00121.jpg
     
  38. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Further thoughts on the alarm and verge positioning. One of the (many) things I am not clear about is how the alarm in a clock like the would be released. I think I have identified where the lever would be pivoted and how it would be activated, but where and how does it act on the alarm itself?

    Slide3.jpg Slide4.jpg
     
  39. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    The under dial work of a clock by Quare, from p. 372 of Early English Clocks. The description in the text of how the quarter repeat works is hard to follow but I think my clock would have had something along these lines. Not only is there evidence of there having been a similar spring, but mine also has plate holes indicating another arbor vertically above the main quarter repeat wheel, just as in this one and the earlier Etherington.

    20190228_160513.jpg
     
  40. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    My copy of Hobson's Choice - the book describing and illustrating early English quarter repeat mechanisms - finally arrived in the post today. Nearest thing seems to be the Gould clock on page 83. This makes some sense in relation to my clock, but there are still rather too many unexplained holes.

    View attachment 520980

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  41. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Things are slowly starting to fall into place. The hour lifting lever and the strike/silent levers currently on the clock look new and get in the way of the post for the intermediate wheel connecting the hour wheel to the alarm disc. With a T shaped hour lifting lever pivoted above the minute wheel using a cock (now missing, but with holes suggesting it could have been there) and a revised configuration of strike/silent lever which only disengages the automatic strike, not the hour component of the quarter repeat, there is room for the post.

    The Quare quarter repeat shown above and the Gould in Hobson, which I think is closer to mine, are very similar but there seems to be a difference in the sequence of the strike. Whereas the Gould strikes the quarters before the hours, the Quare would seem to strike the hours first. It achieves this with the addition of a warning piece on the third wheel of the quarter repeat train analogous to that on a conventional hour striking train. The hour lever and warning piece are lifted together then the hour lever only is dropped to set off the hour striking. Only when that has finished is the warning on the quarter repeat released to allow the quarters to be struck. The Gould, like the Quare, has a locking piece on the second wheel, but no warning on the third to hold the train while the hour strikes and the hour lifting piece is only dropped when the quarter striking has finished. On my clock the third wheel in the train is in a very different position to that of the Quare and it is by no means clear where any warning piece would fit.

    Slide6.jpg
     
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  42. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    #42 NigelW, Mar 3, 2019
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2019
    Two more holes now possibly accounted for. I think the strike silent lever would have acted by pressing down or releasing the end of the hour lifting lever pivot which sticks out beyond the cock. The other end of the pivot would have stuck out beyond the back of the front plate where it would have come into contact with a flat leaf spring to push it back up when the strike/silent lever was moved off the other end. The pivot would have to be given significant end shake to allow for this up and down movement. Based on studying pictures of other under dial work I also think that there might have been a spring attached to the cock to ensure that the hour lever is down at the left hand end when not engaged. I have amended my diagram accordingly.

    View attachment 521217

    Slide6.jpg
     
  43. DeanT

    DeanT Registered User

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  44. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

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    Dean

    The book was extremely useful - thank you very much for the recommendation. I believe I have now got my heard around the configuration of the quarter repeat but there is still much to do to work up train counts and a detailed design of each component. The breakthrough, which I got from the book, was understanding how the hour strike was initiated in such a way as to coordinate with the quarter striking, which in turn led to me an understanding of the likely configuration of the hour lifting piece and of the strike/silent mechanism.

    One thing I don't yet understand about quarter repeats is how the train is prevented from being forced backwards as the repeat is wound. Clearly there needs to be a ratchet on the pin wheel, which is concentric with the winder, analogous to that on the great wheels of the main trains, but this will only work if the train is locked or has enough friction or inertia for the click to operate rather than move the train backwards. As I understand it, the locking on the second wheel in the Gould is disengaged as soon as the winding begins so what is there to stop the train going backwards thereafter other than, perhaps, the bell hammers? The Quare also unlocks the second wheel as the winding begins but immediately engages the warning on the third, thus locking the train for the remainder of the winding action.

    An additional ratchet to hold the train in relation to the plates would be a possibility, along the lines used in a Harrison's maintaining power set up, but I can't see any evidence of this in any photos or diagrams. I still have some mystery holes in quarter repeat area of the back plate so am I still missing something?

    Thanks again

    Nigel
     
  45. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

    Jan 2, 2015
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    Further discussion with my tutor today. Found some more blocked holes in the back plate which are helping determine the position of the verge and alarm train (see picture). I now have a theory that the alarm work was altered at some point before its removal. The hole in chapter ring has never looked right and evidence suggests there could have been a different alarm arrangement, as in the clock in the second picture, also by Etherington.

    The relationship of the movement to the subsidiary dials is quite awkward so the issue arose again of whether the movement and dial started off life together. However both are signed, the style of engraving on the dial and backplate is very consistent and I can see no holes in the front plate, blocked or otherwise, which suggest there was ever a different dial. I therefore incline to the view that this is not a marriage, or at least not one which was consummated after both parts had left Etherington's workshop.

    Slide7.jpg 298a.png
     
  46. DeanT

    DeanT Registered User

    Mar 22, 2009
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    Hi Nigel,

    I've never really paid much attention to the backplate of the pendulum aperture. I've a few with the mock pendulum but this is the only one that is in pieces so I could photograph it for you.

    Its by Brouncker Watts who was an apprentice of Joseph Knibb and died in 1719 so the dial must be circa 1715-1719.

    The backplate of the mock pendulum is attached on one side as Nick has previously indicated. I think its original as it has the same zig-zags on the back which is found on the back of the dial and date ring etc. Let me know if the pictures aren't good enough and I will try again.....

    Cheers
    Dean

    backplate.jpeg Dial.JPG dial2.jpeg
     
  47. Ralph

    Ralph Registered User
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    Jan 22, 2002
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    They sometimes attach the mock pendulum backdrop or skirt(?) to the movement., instead of the dial. It makes life easier.

    Ralph

    IMG_1033_(1600_x_1200).jpg
     
  48. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

    Jul 26, 2015
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    I did wonder if the did that, it would make things more simple.
     
  49. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

    Jan 2, 2015
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    Thanks for this. I have had a careful look at the various cocks and bridges to see if I can find a spare screw hole but with no luck so far. That's not to say there wasn't one before.
     
  50. NigelW

    NigelW Registered User

    Jan 2, 2015
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    Spent most of the day driving to rural Kent and back to see Anthony Gray, a leading English clock restorer whom I have decided to commission to restore my dial and case. He very kindly had a good look at the movement too and has given me a couple of new ideas about it. He thought the movement (what's left of it), dial and hands are broadly OK and what I felt was a rather clumsy relationship between them is something he has seen before. His greatest doubts were about the case. The top and its brassware looked OK to him, and probably the bottom too (other than its alteration to take the longer anchor pendulum) but pretty much everything in between (sides, frets, back door and possibly front door too) looks like a later replacement. This was no surprise as the auctioneer's description was pretty unflattering. To my untrained eye it looks in keeping however. He is gong to show it to his case restorer for another opinion before we decide what to do. As for the dial, I am now sufficiently confident that the hole in the chapter ring is a later alteration that I have asked him to plug it.
     

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