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  1. #1

    Default Celebrate Daylight Saving Time at "Time Fest"

    From Kim Cravens at NAWCC:


    COLUMBIA, PA: When you think of changing the time on your watches and clocks this fall, think of the National Watch and Clock Museum!

    The Museum will certainly not let Daylight Saving Time (DST) go unnoticed with the numerous activities planned for Time Fest, a family event to be held on Saturday, October 29. Come learn about the benefits of, and economic motivations for, moving the clock back one hour to end Daylight Saving Time.

    For the National Watch and Clock Museum, Daylight Saving Time means keeping track of a multitude of clocks that need to be reset and ready for visitors touring the Museum. Columbia is the center of time and home to North America’s largest collection of timepieces, including an 11-foot-tall French Statue Clock, enchanting German musical clocks, and the Engle Monumental Clock with 48 moving figures!

    During TIME FEST, you’ll have the opportunity to spring your clocks to the new time and “clock-in” for fun-filled activities and demonstrations throughout the day.

    Included in the DST activities are numerous Action-Time stations:
    · Make your own recyclable sand clock
    · See a water clock and learn how to make a recyclable one to take home
    · Participate in a scavenger hunt of artifacts related to DST
    · Create origami using paper doilies, in coordination with the Asian Timekeeping area of the Museum
    · Design a kite in honor of Ben Franklin, the founder of DST
    · Make an escapement—a mechanical device that regulates the movement of the clock

    <<MORE>>

    · Enjoy time-related coloring pages
    · Interact with students from the School of Horology conducting demonstrations throughout the Museum

    In addition to all these activities, the Columbia Fire Department will make an appearance distributing information on smoke detectors and fire safety. Also, while you’re at the Museum, stop in the Library and Research Center, to peruse two excellent new books devoted to DST: Seize the Daylight: The Curious and Contentious Story of Daylight Saving Time by David Prerau and Spring Forward: The Annual Madness of Daylight Saving Time by Michael Downing.

    The National Watch and Clock Museum is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. It is operated by the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors, Inc., a non-profit association with approximately 26,000 members, representing 55 countries. The Museum is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday from noon to 4 p.m., and closed on Mondays. Discounts are available to seniors, students, AAA members, and groups of 10 or more. Groups of 10 or more are encouraged to call ahead. For more program information, directions, or general Museum information, call 717-684-8261 or visit our website at http://www.nawcc.org.
    ###

    Here is a Time Trivia Test to challenge you as you prepare for Daylight Saving Time:

    Q: Who first thought of Daylight Saving Time (DST)?

    A: Benjamin Franklin was the first to be recognized for the idea of DST in 1784 as he neared the end of his long tenure as American delegate in Paris. One morning when he awoke to a loud noise, he was astounded to see that sunlight was streaming into his bedroom. If he had awakened at noon, as he usually did, he would have missed six hours of sunlight. So, at the age of 78, in a moment of whimsy, Franklin wrote An Economical Project, a discourse on the thrift of natural versus artificial lighting. Over two centuries later, nations around the world use a variation of his concept to conserve and more fully enjoy the benefits of daylight.

    Q: How do we benefit from DST?

    A: Daylight Saving Time saves energy. In 1975 the Department of Transportation stated that Americans saved more than 10,000 barrels of oil each day – a total of 600,000 barrels that year. Also, DST saves lives
    and reduces traffic injuries because it allows more people to drive or walk home from school in daylight, which is safer than doing so in darkness. In addition, DST lessens crime because people complete more errands and chores in daylight and their exposure to various crimes, which are more common in darkness, is reduced.

    Q: When did the United States adopt DST?

    A: The plan was not formally adopted until 1918. However, the law was not favored by many because people rose and went to bed earlier than we do today. During World War II, President Roosevelt instituted
    “War Time” during 1945-1946, and localities were free to decide whether to observe DST and could
    choose its beginning and end time. This caused much confusion until President Richard Nixon signed into law the DST Energy Act of 1973.

    Q: Which president signed a bill permanently changing the starting date of Daylight Saving Time to the first Sunday in April?

    A: President Ronald Reagan, in 1986.

    Q: Daylight Saving Time begins and ends when?

    A: DST begins in the United States on the first Sunday in April (when clocks are set ahead one hour to 3:00 a.m. local daylight time) and ends on the last Sunday in October at 2:00 a.m. (when clocks are set back one hour to 1:00 a.m. local standard time).

    Q: What states do not observe DST?

    A: Arizona and Hawaii

    Q: Is there a proper way to change the time on a clock?

    A: On a mechanical clock, be sure to only move the minute hand forward. Mechanical clocks can be significantly damaged by moving the minute hand backward. Approximately 90% of the watches out there are not mechanical and can safely be set back in the fall. The other 10%, mechanical timepieces, must simply be stopped for one hour.

  2. #2

    Default Celebrate Daylight Saving Time at "Time Fest" (RE: Gene Klodzen)

    From Kim Cravens at NAWCC:


    COLUMBIA, PA: When you think of changing the time on your watches and clocks this fall, think of the National Watch and Clock Museum!

    The Museum will certainly not let Daylight Saving Time (DST) go unnoticed with the numerous activities planned for Time Fest, a family event to be held on Saturday, October 29. Come learn about the benefits of, and economic motivations for, moving the clock back one hour to end Daylight Saving Time.

    For the National Watch and Clock Museum, Daylight Saving Time means keeping track of a multitude of clocks that need to be reset and ready for visitors touring the Museum. Columbia is the center of time and home to North America’s largest collection of timepieces, including an 11-foot-tall French Statue Clock, enchanting German musical clocks, and the Engle Monumental Clock with 48 moving figures!

    During TIME FEST, you’ll have the opportunity to spring your clocks to the new time and “clock-in” for fun-filled activities and demonstrations throughout the day.

    Included in the DST activities are numerous Action-Time stations:
    · Make your own recyclable sand clock
    · See a water clock and learn how to make a recyclable one to take home
    · Participate in a scavenger hunt of artifacts related to DST
    · Create origami using paper doilies, in coordination with the Asian Timekeeping area of the Museum
    · Design a kite in honor of Ben Franklin, the founder of DST
    · Make an escapement—a mechanical device that regulates the movement of the clock

    <<MORE>>

    · Enjoy time-related coloring pages
    · Interact with students from the School of Horology conducting demonstrations throughout the Museum

    In addition to all these activities, the Columbia Fire Department will make an appearance distributing information on smoke detectors and fire safety. Also, while you’re at the Museum, stop in the Library and Research Center, to peruse two excellent new books devoted to DST: Seize the Daylight: The Curious and Contentious Story of Daylight Saving Time by David Prerau and Spring Forward: The Annual Madness of Daylight Saving Time by Michael Downing.

    The National Watch and Clock Museum is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. It is operated by the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors, Inc., a non-profit association with approximately 26,000 members, representing 55 countries. The Museum is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday from noon to 4 p.m., and closed on Mondays. Discounts are available to seniors, students, AAA members, and groups of 10 or more. Groups of 10 or more are encouraged to call ahead. For more program information, directions, or general Museum information, call 717-684-8261 or visit our website at http://www.nawcc.org.
    ###

    Here is a Time Trivia Test to challenge you as you prepare for Daylight Saving Time:

    Q: Who first thought of Daylight Saving Time (DST)?

    A: Benjamin Franklin was the first to be recognized for the idea of DST in 1784 as he neared the end of his long tenure as American delegate in Paris. One morning when he awoke to a loud noise, he was astounded to see that sunlight was streaming into his bedroom. If he had awakened at noon, as he usually did, he would have missed six hours of sunlight. So, at the age of 78, in a moment of whimsy, Franklin wrote An Economical Project, a discourse on the thrift of natural versus artificial lighting. Over two centuries later, nations around the world use a variation of his concept to conserve and more fully enjoy the benefits of daylight.

    Q: How do we benefit from DST?

    A: Daylight Saving Time saves energy. In 1975 the Department of Transportation stated that Americans saved more than 10,000 barrels of oil each day – a total of 600,000 barrels that year. Also, DST saves lives
    and reduces traffic injuries because it allows more people to drive or walk home from school in daylight, which is safer than doing so in darkness. In addition, DST lessens crime because people complete more errands and chores in daylight and their exposure to various crimes, which are more common in darkness, is reduced.

    Q: When did the United States adopt DST?

    A: The plan was not formally adopted until 1918. However, the law was not favored by many because people rose and went to bed earlier than we do today. During World War II, President Roosevelt instituted
    “War Time” during 1945-1946, and localities were free to decide whether to observe DST and could
    choose its beginning and end time. This caused much confusion until President Richard Nixon signed into law the DST Energy Act of 1973.

    Q: Which president signed a bill permanently changing the starting date of Daylight Saving Time to the first Sunday in April?

    A: President Ronald Reagan, in 1986.

    Q: Daylight Saving Time begins and ends when?

    A: DST begins in the United States on the first Sunday in April (when clocks are set ahead one hour to 3:00 a.m. local daylight time) and ends on the last Sunday in October at 2:00 a.m. (when clocks are set back one hour to 1:00 a.m. local standard time).

    Q: What states do not observe DST?

    A: Arizona and Hawaii

    Q: Is there a proper way to change the time on a clock?

    A: On a mechanical clock, be sure to only move the minute hand forward. Mechanical clocks can be significantly damaged by moving the minute hand backward. Approximately 90% of the watches out there are not mechanical and can safely be set back in the fall. The other 10%, mechanical timepieces, must simply be stopped for one hour.

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