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  1. #1

    Default Bellows lift wires

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    I am trying to re-assemble a cuckoo clock, having never seen the inside of one before. The bellows lift wires have different ends, one is "S" shaped and the other is a longer, single 180 degree bend. Am I correct in assuming that the single 180 degree bend end attaches to the eye on the movement, and the S end attaches to the bellow's eye? How does the bellow eye fit into the S end? Do I need to bend the S portion, and if so, how?
    Last edited by garyjo; 06-14-2012 at 10:00 PM.

  2. #2
    Registered User Bill Stuntz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bellows lift wire question (RE: garyjo)

    You are correct. That looks exactly like the one I'm working on - MY first one, too! The 180 hooks into the loop. The tip of the S bend just slips into the eye on the bellows, the eye just sits in the V. It's bent correctly and shouldn't come loose once everything is mounted.
    Last edited by Bill Stuntz; 06-14-2012 at 10:05 PM.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Bellows lift wire question (RE: Bill Stuntz)

    It seems when I tried that, the whole wire slipped down, coming off both eyes. Do I need to bend the 180 degree end around the movement eye so it doesn't fall out?

  4. #4
    Registered User Bill Stuntz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bellows lift wire question (RE: garyjo)

    Give me a few minutes, I don't have a good picture of this one. I'll take the back off again & post one.

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ID:	134134 The back side of the V keeps it from falling back down. Maybe you didn't have it far enough in? The second photo shows it best. I had to hook it before mounting the bellows. I couldn't get it past the bottom of the V with the bellows in the case.
    Last edited by Bill Stuntz; 06-14-2012 at 10:27 PM.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Bellows lift wire question (RE: garyjo)

    Quote Originally Posted by garyjo View Post
    It seems when I tried that, the whole wire slipped down, coming off both eyes. Do I need to bend the 180 degree end around the movement eye so it doesn't fall out?
    The top eye in the bellows should be vertical. The bottom is vertical. First hook the S top on the bellows eye, then hook the 180 end onto the lever, THEN move the whistle into position on the nail and fasten it with the screw. The S can't can't get out of the top eye and the bottom 180 can't get out of the lever once everything is vertical. The right side attaches to the longer lever. The left side (bird tail lifting wire) attaches to the shorter lever.

    Jim
    Last edited by Jim Hartog; 06-15-2012 at 07:35 AM. Reason: my name was there twice, added stuff

  6. #6

    Default Re: Bellows lift wire question (RE: Jim Hartog)

    You seem to be in a hurry to "bend" the wires.

    Do NOT bend the wires or you will have other problems. Once wire is bent it is very hard to get it back to where it was.

    The bellows pipes have to be removed. Jim gives a good description of what you have to do next to get it all together without bending.

  7. #7
    Registered User Bill Stuntz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bellows lift wire question (RE: Jim Hartog)

    Jim, I think your description is better than mine. I hooked the S to the bellows staple (= his eye) first, then maneuvered the bottom end of the wire into the loop at the movement end, and finally secured the whistle to the case. Bottom end first might be easier on his, but my case is narrow enough that I couldn't quite get the whistle into the right position to hook to the staple after the bottom was hooked.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Bellows lift wire question (RE: Bill Stuntz)

    What Jim and Len said. No bending. The wire can only come off, or be put on, when the bellows/whistle is removed. Some folks routinely bend out the lower hook to remove the lift wire but this will eventually result in breakage or a misshaped loop.

    Willie X

  9. #9

    Default Re: Bellows lift wire question (RE: Willie X)

    You don't need to remove the bellows to remove the wires. And you don't need to bend the wires, either. At least I don't.
    To remove the wire, open the eyelet on the end of the lever just enough to slip the wire out through the opening, then unhook it from the bellows top.
    To put it back, reverse the process and squeeze the eyelet shut.
    It works for me.

  10. #10
    Registered User Bill Stuntz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bellows lift wire question (RE: bangster)

    Bangster: You CERTAINLY know more than I do. But I have been (relatively) blindly obeying the advice I've received here to never bend anything, because the odds are that it's already correctly shaped. Your simple "open it just enough" may very well be A (or even THE) correct solution, but if I can find a do-able "no bend" solution, I'd rather do it that way. To me, dismounting the whistle/bellows seems to be more precisely reversible. With my lack of experience, I'm not SURE that opening/closing the eyelet wouldn't break it. And if it did, I'd REALLY be up a creek, because I recognize that I lack the skill/experience to repair or recreate the lever. I don't want to DO anything that I'm not SURE I can UNDO perfectly. I DID break the last link of one of the chains when I opened it to remove the stop ring. But I also know that a 6+ foot chain with 1 fewer 1/4" link will show NO functional difference - it'll just need to be rewound a few seconds sooner.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Bellows lift wire question (RE: Bill Stuntz)

    Thanks to everyone who replied to my question. I was able to install both wires by taking out each bellow, attaching that end first, then attaching the movement end while manipulating the bellow. I didn't need to bend the wires or open up any of the eyes. Thanks again for all your help.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Bellows lift wire question (RE: garyjo)

    Hi
    I often flare about 1/8 inch of the end of the 180 degree wire.
    It makes it a little easier to hook the loop and has no effect
    while running.
    One tends to find that one need a small third hand while
    putting these back together. Notice I said small. There just
    isn't any room for another hand.
    You need to lift the loop, hold the hook on the bellows
    and hook the bottom of the wire on at the same time.
    It just seems like on never has enough hands.
    Tinker Dwight

  13. #13

    Default Re: Bellows lift wire question (RE: Bill Stuntz)

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Stuntz View Post
    Bangster: You CERTAINLY know more than I do. But I have been (relatively) blindly obeying the advice I've received here to never bend anything, because the odds are that it's already correctly shaped. Your simple "open it just enough" may very well be A (or even THE) correct solution, but if I can find a do-able "no bend" solution, I'd rather do it that way. To me, dismounting the whistle/bellows seems to be more precisely reversible. With my lack of experience, I'm not SURE that opening/closing the eyelet wouldn't break it. And if it did, I'd REALLY be up a creek, because I recognize that I lack the skill/experience to repair or recreate the lever. I don't want to DO anything that I'm not SURE I can UNDO perfectly. I DID break the last link of one of the chains when I opened it to remove the stop ring. But I also know that a 6+ foot chain with 1 fewer 1/4" link will show NO functional difference - it'll just need to be rewound a few seconds sooner.
    Not trying to tell anybody what they ought to do. Just telling what I do. Never had a problem with it. If it bothers you, by all means don't do it that way.

    As for the "don't bend" rule, I'll bet you'll find yourself bending strike and chime hammer shafts to achieve a better sound, rather than trying to relocate the gong or the chime rods to accommodate the hammers.

  14. #14
    Registered User Bill Stuntz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bellows lift wire question (RE: bangster)

    Bangster: I was not intending ANY criticism of your technique! You have the experience to know it's safe to do it that way. And I've ALREADY violated that "rule" - for EXACTLY the reason you just described, to adjust hammer shafts that I'm SURE from other threads can be safely bent to adjust them. That's why I said "(relatively) blindly obeyed" in my post. As a newbie, I try to err on the side of caution. I don't KNOW that those eyelets/shafts aren't hardened/brittle. I DOUBT it, but I don't KNOW. And I don't have enough experience to be able to recognize whether they're hardened or not. Finding out that they ARE (the hard way by breaking one) would NOT be a good thing, especially considering my lack of experience fabricating replacement parts. I'm probably trying to be TOO careful, but I'm doing my best to avoid making stupid newbie mistakes. I'm trying very hard to not DO anything I can't UNDO when I find out that I was wrong.
    Last edited by Bill Stuntz; 06-15-2012 at 10:25 PM.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Bellows lift wire question (RE: Bill Stuntz)

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Stuntz View Post
    Bangster: I was not intending ANY criticism of your technique! You have the experience to know it's safe to do it that way. And I've ALREADY violated that "rule" - for EXACTLY the reason you just described, to adjust hammer shafts that I'm SURE from other threads can be safely bent to adjust them. That's why I said "(relatively) blindly obeyed" in my post. As a newbie, I try to err on the side of caution. I don't KNOW that those eyelets/shafts aren't hardened/brittle. I DOUBT it, but I don't KNOW. And I don't have enough experience to be able to recognize whether they're hardened or not. Finding out that they ARE (the hard way by breaking one) would NOT be a good thing, especially considering my lack of experience fabricating replacement parts. I'm probably trying to be TOO careful, but I'm doing my best to avoid making stupid newbie mistakes. I'm trying very hard to not DO anything I can't UNDO when I find out that I was wrong.
    What I said, Bill:"If it bothers you, by all means don't do it that way." I praise your caution. You're going at it the right way.

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