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  1. #1

    Default Sessions Model 8606

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    Just acquired a Sessions Model 8606 mantel clock for my study, Google hasn't been much help on this specific model so I was hoping someone on here could shed some light on this model and maybe point me in the direction of some literature.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Sessions Model 8606 (RE: 2e151)

    Welcome to the message board. Just judging from the catalogue illustrations and descriptions in Tran Duy Ly's book on Sessions clocks, Sessions issued a few so-called "bim-bam" strike tambours in the mid-1930's (seen in Tran from the 1936 catalogue). Bim-bam refers to the double, or two-tone strike of the hours, as indicated on your label. Tran does not show your particular clock among those in his book, but it certainly would fit in with that "series." And note the "10-38" stamped on your label. Possibly October 1938, which again would be consistent with the 1936 catalogue illustrations in Tran. I also note, FWIW, that the label on yours calls the strike a "Two-Tone Chime," whereas we normally would call it simply a two-tone strike, reserving the term "chime" for a tune, such as the Westminster Chime. I guess we shouldn't be too insistent on what we call it.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Sessions Model 8606 (RE: Steven Thornberry)

    Can you point me in the direction of "mechanical clocks 101"? Tried searching, but either I'm putting the wrong phrases in the search box, or I'm just not looking hard enough.

    Acouple of basic questions I have are:

    1. Do I let it wind down all the way and stop, or should I wind it on the 7th day to keep it going?

    2. Typical number of winds needed?

    3. To change the time do I need to do anything special, or do I just move the hands to the desired time?

    I do intend to take it by the local clock/watch repair shop to get it checked out once it arrives.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Sessions Model 8606 (RE: 2e151)

    You should wind the clock once a week on the same day of the week. It should not be necessary to wind it more often. That said, it has a long enough main spring on the time side to allow it to run beyond the week. I once had a Sessions tambour from the 1920's/30's that could run for nearly three weeks on a single wind. That is a bit unusual, I think. It took about thirty turns to wind it up fully again. If you wind yours once a week, 12-15 half turns of the key should wind it fully. You will be able to tell when it is wound up tight - the key won't turn any more. Note: When you get it, it may be wound fairly far down and may require more turns than I indicated to wind it fully. On a Sessions, both sides wind counter clockwise. Facing the front of the clock, the right side is for the time; the left is for the strike.

    To change the time, simply move the minute hand clockwise to the correct time, stopping at the half-hours and hours to let it strike. Do this after winding it fully. If you find that the hour strike does not match the hour shown by the minute hand, you can simply move the hour hand to the correct hour to put it in sync. The hour hand is friction fit over the hour tube and can be moved without harm to the clock. However, adjustments not requiring sync'ing up the strike should always be made with the minute hand.

    You are wise in taking to a clock repair shop to hav it checked. Although it looks good from the picture, if it hasn't been run in a while, or if it hasn't been checked in a while, it is not a bad idea to do it after you get it.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Sessions Model 8606 (RE: Steven Thornberry)

    How does the speed adjuster work? It's working great, though about two minutes fast.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Sessions Model 8606 (RE: 2e151)

    Your winding key needs to be a double-ended key, one side considerably smaller than the other. The smaller end is used to adjust the regulator to slow down or speed up the clock. The small end of the key should fit sungly over the little adjustment arbor at the "12." Turn to the left to speed up the clock and to the right to slow it down. However, you don't say over what period it runs two minutes fast. If it gains two minutes in a week, that's really darn good timekeeping, and adjusting to slow it down without slowing it down too much may be a difficult. In that case, I would let it be - but that's me. If it gains two minutes every day, on the other hand, it might be worth adjusting to slow it down. In any event, I would let it run through at least two (maybe three) week-long cycles and see what it does before attempting adjustment.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Sessions Model 8606 (RE: Steven Thornberry)

    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Thornberry View Post
    In any event, I would let it run through at least two (maybe three) week-long cycles and see what it does before attempting adjustment.
    Good advice that I think I shall take before I start messing with speed. Though if it does become necessary, does a certain number of turns to the time regulator equate to a certain number of seconds or minutes? Or is it pretty much guess work.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Sessions Model 8606 (RE: 2e151)

    Quote Originally Posted by 2e151 View Post
    Good advice that I think I shall take before I start messing with speed. Though if it does become necessary, does a certain number of turns to the time regulator equate to a certain number of seconds or minutes? Or is it pretty much guess work.
    It's always guess-work for me. I would do a quarter turn (90 degrees) at a time and see what happens. One other thing to keep in mind is that many older clocks have a bit of play in the minute hand (perhaps a minute or two), which should be factored in. Always remember to reset the time after adjusting the speed. Just adjusting the speed itself will not be enough. You need to judge it's speed after setting the clock to whatever timekeeper (e.g., quartz watch) you use as your regulator.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Sessions Model 8606 (RE: Steven Thornberry)

    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Thornberry View Post
    Always remember to reset the time after adjusting the speed.
    What do you mean by resetting the time?

  10. #10

    Default Re: Sessions Model 8606 (RE: 2e151)

    Quote Originally Posted by 2e151 View Post
    What do you mean by resetting the time?
    If it has been running fast or slow, set the time to the correct time according to whatever timepiece you use to set the clock. Just adjusting the speed will not allow for a proper judgement of how fast or slow it actually runs.

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